Media: “The Rise Of Netflix – An Empire Built On Debt” (The Guardian Podcasts)

Netflix has risen from obscurity to be one of the most powerful media companies in the world with more than 150 million global subscribers. It has launched critically acclaimed hits such as House of Cards, The Crown and Unbelievable, as well as showcasing the back catalogues of popular television series. But as part of its rapid growth, the company has racked up huge debts.

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Joining Anushka Asthana to discuss the long-term sustainability of Netflix are the TV critic Mark Lawson and the Guardian’s deputy business editor Dan Milmo.

Profiles: Remembering “Postmodernist” Theorist & Architecture Historian Charles Jencks (1939-2019)

From an Apollo Magazine article:

Charles Jencks 2008Jencks’s book grew out of his PhD thesis, supervised by Reyner Banham at the University of London in the late 1960s, and paved the way for his later, more explicitly polemical The Language of Post-Modern Architecture (1977). In this bestselling book, Jencks set out his stall for a pluralist architecture that rejected what he saw as modernism’s reductive ‘univalent’ approach, swapping it for a symbolically rich and historically engaged ‘multivalent’ postmodernism. For good or bad it became the defining book of its era, an unabashed rejection of mainstream modernism that ushered in a new architectural style.

Modern Movements in Architecture (1973) by Charles JencksModern Movements in Architecture (1973) by Charles Jencks was one of the first books on architecture I read, a birthday present given to me the summer before I started my degree. In some ways, it spoiled things: I thought all architecture books would be that much fun. Modern Movements in Architecture is a complex and sophisticated history, but it wears its learning lightly. It relates architecture to a wider cultural discourse and it is unafraid to be critical, even of some architects, such as Mies van der Rohe, who were previously considered to be above criticism.

To read more: https://www.apollo-magazine.com/remembering-charles-jencks/?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=APNE%20%2020191125%20%20AL&utm_content=APNE%20%2020191125%20%20AL+CID_7c3d4bb6631465b2c8eab8a1cebe2725&utm_source=CampaignMonitor_Apollo&utm_term=His%20writing%20was%20always%20alive%20to%20the%20deep%20pleasures%20of%20great%20buildings

 

Studies: High Usage Of Commonly Used Oral Antibiotics Increases Risk Of Parkinson’s Disease

From a Neuroscience News & Research online article:

International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society“The link between antibiotic exposure and Parkinson’s disease fits the current view that in a significant proportion of patients the pathology of Parkinson’s may originate in the gut, possibly related to microbial changes, years before the onset of typical Parkinson motor symptoms such as slowness, muscle stiffness and shaking of the extremities. It was known that the bacterial composition of the intestine in Parkinson’s patients is abnormal, but the cause is unclear. Our results suggest that some commonly used antibiotics, which are known to strongly influence the gut microbiota, could be a predisposing factor,” says research team leader, neurologist Filip Scheperjans MD, Ph.D. from the Department of Neurology of Helsinki University Hospital.

Higher exposure to commonly used oral antibiotics is linked to an increased risk of Parkinson’s disease according to a recently published study by researchers from the Helsinki University Hospital, Finland.

The strongest associations were found for broad-spectrum antibiotics and those that act against anaerobic bacteria and fungi. The timing of antibiotic exposure also seemed to matter.

The study suggests that excessive use of certain antibiotics can predispose to Parkinson’s disease with a delay of up to 10 to 15 years. This connection may be explained by their disruptive effects on the gut microbial ecosystem.

To read more: https://www.technologynetworks.com/neuroscience/news/high-antibiotic-use-linked-to-parkinsons-disease-327574?utm_campaign=NEWSLETTER_TN_Breaking%20Science%20News&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=79860634&_hsenc=p2ANqtz–_nnD-InNAm660b4dNIgEv57uzmLlk_LytFh7Scy9VWyekeywrdb7g2Be0Cp5uO7DoNsRuPF76EvY99oZ2rHBR9M1iEw&_hsmi=79860634

Automobile Nostalgia: “1963 Alfa Romeo Giulia – 1600 Sprint Speciale”

From a Classic Driver online article:

This extraordinary Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Sprint Special was delivered on 03.10.1963 in Pescara (Italy) and was home (city) of their time in Italy. The car was optimized for performance after delivery by Autodelta. Cylinder head, camshaft and manifold were changed and the output increased to 125 hp.

1963 Alfa Romeo Giulia 1600 Sprint Speciale

To read more: https://www.classicdriver.com/en/car/alfa-romeo/giulia/1963/716133?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=Classic%20Driver%20Daily%203302019&utm_content=Classic%20Driver%20Daily%203302019+CID_bf23adaa64328b289e7d01e1b717e54a&utm_source=newsletter

 

Brain Science Podcasts: MRI Scans Now Reveal “Thoughts And Feelings” (60 Minutes)

60 Minutes logoWho among us hasn’t wished we could read someone else’s mind, know exactly what they’re thinking? Well that’s impossible, of course, since our thoughts are, more than anything else, our own. Private, personal, unreachable. Or at least that’s what we’ve always, well, thought. 

Advances in neuroscience have shown that, on a physical level, our thoughts are actually a vast network of neurons firing all across our brains. So if that brain activity could be identified and analyzed, could our thoughts be decoded? Could our minds be read? Well, a team of scientists at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh has spent more than a decade trying to do just that. We started our reporting on their work 10 years ago, and what they’ve discovered since, has drawn us back.

To read more: https://www.cbsnews.com/news/functional-magnetic-resonance-imaging-computer-analysis-read-thoughts-60-minutes-2019-11-24/