Tag Archives: Nostalgia

Movie Nostalgia: It’s Been 60 Years Since “Best Ever” Big-Screen Comedy “Some Like It Hot” Opened (1959)

From a BBC.com cuture article:

Some Like It Hot movie sceneFaced with the question of why Some Like It Hot has topped BBC Culture’s poll of the best ever big-screen comedies, it’s tempting to say something similar. Wilder’s glittering masterpiece doesn’t just use the handsomest kid in town (and a terrific actor, to boot), but its most radiant sex symbol, Marilyn Monroe, and one of its most dexterous comedians, Jack Lemmon. It also has a bevy of bathing beauties, a crowd of sinister mafiosi, a glamorous seaside setting in the roaring ‘20s, and a sizzling selection of songs.

It is structured so meticulously that it glides from moment to moment with the elegance of an Olympic figure skater, and the consummate screwball dialogue, by Wilder and IAL Diamond, is so polished that every line includes either a joke, a double meaning, or an allusion to a line elsewhere in the film. To quote one character, it’s a riot of “spills, thrills, laughs and games”. To quote another, it deserves to be “the biggest thing since the Graf Zeppelin”. So why was it chosen as the best comedy ever made? Simple. What else were we going to choose?

To read more click on the following link: http://www.bbc.com/culture/story/20170817-why-some-like-it-hot-is-the-greatest-comedy-ever-made

Rock Nostalgia: Led Zeppelin’s Final Studio Album “In Through The Out Door” Celebrates 40th Anniversary (1979)

From a Rolling Stone online article:

In Through The Out Door Led Zeppelin 1979 tracksThe album was rumored to be originally titled Look, but the title was changed to In Through the Out Door as a nod to the band overcoming their struggles. (“That’s the hardest way to get back in,” Page said). Hipgnosis — the English design company co-owned by Aubrey Powell and Storm Thorgerson — designed six different album sleeves, each depicting sepia-toned scenes in a New Orleans–inspired bar. Copies were famously packaged in brown paper bags, concealing which cover was purchased. Even with this odd gimmick, the record sold an astounding 2 million copies in the first 10 days of its release. With record sales at a dangerous low, the album’s success helped revive an ailing industry.

Instead of embarking on a tour, the band decided to return to the stage with two outdoor shows at England’s Knebworth Festival on August 4th and 11th, 1979 — their first time playing on U.K. soil in four years. In the video above, they tear through “In the Evening” with Bonham taking the lead, pounding the drums during an intense strobe-light display. “So don’t you let her get under your skin,” Plant sings. “It’s only bad luck and trouble/From the day that you begin.”

To read more click on the following link: https://www.rollingstone.com/music/music-news/led-zeppelin-in-through-out-door-knebworth-1979-866992/

Automotive Nostalgia: 25th Annual Woodward Dream Cruise On August 17 In Detroit Will Feature Over 40,000 Classic Cars

From a Curbed.com online article:

Four Ford Thunderbirds at the 2014 Woodward Dream Cruise - ShutterstockEnthusiasts and spectators will soon be out showing off their rides for the 25th Annual Woodward Dream Cruise, which rolls through the northern suburbs along Woodward Avenue on Saturday, August 17. The world’s largest one-day automotive event is an enormous draw—last year an estimated 1.5 million people attended and 40,000 classic cars were on the roads.

While the main event takes place from Pontiac to Ferndale, Detroit also has a few offerings for visitors this year. Here’s where to go if you want to watch—or avoid—the festivities.

Time

Officially, the Woodward Dream Cruise runs Saturday, August 17 from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. Events have already started, and an official ribbon cutting will take place on Friday at 5 p.m. in Ferndale.

To read more click on following link: https://detroit.curbed.com/2018/8/16/17690358/woodward-dream-cruise-2019-traffic-parking-route

Restaurant Nostalgia: “Musso & Frank Grill” Featured In “Once Upon A Time In…Hollywood”

From a NY Times article by Jill Cowan and 

history-img-2If you are among the significant number of people who’ve seen Quentin Tarantino’s latest love letter to a bygone era, “Once Upon a Time … in Hollywood,” then you’ve seen the Musso & Frank Grill.

It’s the spot where Leonardo DiCaprio’s and Brad Pitt’s characters commiserate about their lives over a whiskey sour and a bloody Mary. They also share an emotional moment in the restaurant’s parking lot as they wait for the valet, and a Musso & Frank sign looms prominently over their heads.

It’s clear Mr. Tarantino has an affection for the place, which will have been open for a century on Sept. 27, and has been a favored industry haunt for almost that entire time.

To read more click on the following link: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/08/02/us/california-today-musso-frank-grill.html

1950’s Nostalgia: In Ten Years Television Sets Went From Luxury Item To Family Room Furniture

From a Curbed.com online article:

1950-Motorola-TV-AdThe postwar boom made TV ubiquitous: In 1950, 3,880,000 households in America had a TV—about 9 percent of the total population. By 1960, 90 percent of all households had at least one. This was the golden age of appliance marketing for all kinds of durable goods, from cars to dishwashers, and television marketers initially took a curious tack with their wares. While the auto industry and manufacturers of coffee makers and cooktops positioned their products as accessible components of a high-tech future, the makers of television sets often sold their devices as elegant pieces of contemporary or even classic furniture.

 

To read more click on the following link: https://www.curbed.com/2019/7/31/20729252/living-room-design-tv-history

Cinematic Nostalgia: “Jay Myself” Documents Life Of NYC Artist/Photographer Jay Maisel, End Of An Era

DSC1245_A-1JAY MYSELF documents the monumental move of renowned photographer and artist, Jay Maisel, who, in February 2015 after forty-eight years, begrudgingly sold his home—the 36,000 square-foot, 100-year-old landmark building in Manhattan known simply as “The Bank.” Through the intimate lens of filmmaker and Jay’s protégé, noted artist and photographer Stephen Wilkes, the viewer is taken on a remarkable journey through Jay’s life as an artist, mentor, and man; a man grappling with time, life, change, and the end of an era in New York City.

Writer’s Nostalgia: Fragile And Suspended Memories Of The Pencil

From an 1843Magazine.com article by Ann Wroe:

colored-pencils-in-butter-crock-jean-grobergPencils are discarded, as lighters and umbrellas are, because at some crucial moment they fail in their purpose. They refuse to ignite, quail before a shower, or simply snap. But pencils have merely suspended their usefulness. Their potential still lies within them. They can go on setting down by the thousand the words by which the world works.

Yet the pencil’s marks are worryingly fragile. I have worked on Percy Bysshe Shelley’s notebooks, 200 years old, where the pencil-scrawled originals are forbidden to all but the most careful hands. Shelley used pens and ink-bottles both at his desk and out of doors, but he preferred pencils in the open air, and perhaps not just for practical reasons. To look on his pencilled drafts is almost to see the graphite dust sifting away before your eyes – blown by the wild West Wind, perhaps.

In Praise of the Pencil 1843Magazine ILLUSTRATION MIKE MCQUADE

To read more click the following link: https://www.1843magazine.com/design/stranger-things/in-praise-of-the-pencil