Literary Preview: The Paris Review – Winter 2022 – 2023

No photo description available.

The Paris Review – December/Winter 2022:

Colm Tóibín on the Art of Fiction: “No matter what you do in a novel there’s a secret DNA of whatever it is that you’ve suffered.” N. Scott Momaday on the Art of Poetry: “I was writing lines that looked like lines of poetry, recollecting my early days on the reservation, but I didn’t know the difference between a spondee and a dactyl.”

FICTION

Mieko Kanai – Tap Water

Addie E. Citchens – A Good Samaritan

Sophie Madeline Dess – Zalmanovs

Tom Drury – Where Does This Live?

Isabella Hammad – Gertrude

Lucas Hnathfrom –  Old Actress

Kate Riley – L. R.

Avigayl Sharp – Uncontrollable, Irrelevant

Prose by Avigayl Sharp, Lucas Hnath, and Mieko Kanai.

Poetry by William IX of Aquitaine, Cynthia Cruz, and Peter Mishler.

Art by Mary Manning and Lily van der Stokker.

Cover by Uman.

Arts & Literature: The Top Nine Art Books Of 2022

The Art Newspaper (December 6, 2022) – The books team at The Art Newspaper has waded through the piles of art tomes published this year so you don’t have too. Below, each editor has picked three publications that shone through in 2022.

A Revolution on Canvas: The Rise of Women Artists in Britain and France 1760-1830 by Paris A. Spies-Gans (Paul Mellon Centre/Yale)

The miniaturist Sarah Biffen (subject of the excellent Without Hands show at Philip Mould gallery in London, until 12 December, and accompanying publication), born with no arms or legs, was one of many professional women artists to exhibit in major venues in Paris and London between 1760 and 1830, beyond the few currently celebrated (Angelica Kauffman, Élisabeth Vigée Le Brun, etc.), as Spies-Gans’s exhaustive, groundbreaking research reveals in this beautifully produced book.

Käthe Kollwitz: A Survey of Her Works 1888-1942, edited by Hannelore Fischer (Hirmer/Käthe Kollwitz Museum)

This year has been a particularly good one for stand-alone publishing on historic and Modern women artists, and women’s significant influence within the international art world—fingers crossed this signals a shift (at last) from niche to mainstream. Honourable mention goes to Lund Humphries’s Illuminating Women Artists series, with two books in the bag (Luisa Roldán and Artemisia Gentileschi) and two more scheduled for 2023 (Elisabetta Sirani and Rosalba Carriera). It was a brutal selection process, but the first of my top three, from the many excellent books we reviewed over the last year, is Fischer’s Käthe Kollwitz. Kollwitz’s brilliance requires no introduction, but this exquisitely illustrated survey, while exploring her many iconic works, draws attention to lesser-known imagery including her subtly erotic subjects.

Jo van Gogh-Bonger: The Woman Who Made Vincent Famous by Hans Luijten, translated by Lynne Richards (Bloomsbury)

Chicago University Press’s first English translation of the Parisian art dealer Berthe Weill’s 1933 memoir was pipped to the post by this superb biography of the equally extraordinary Jo van Gogh-Bonger. So much has been written on Vincent van Gogh that you wonder what more can be said. It turns out much more on the woman who was the early driving force behind the Dutch artist’s legacy.

Gareth Harris, book club co-editor and chief contributing editor

Monumental Lies: Culture Wars and the Truth About the Past by Robert Bevan (Verso)

More and more commentators are making their voices heard in the clamour around today’s so-called “culture wars”, outlining the ideologies behind the destruction of, for instance, historic statues. Bevan astutely argues that those who manipulate our cultural past are shaping our future, making the case that historic buildings have become battlegrounds for right-wing and nationalist political arguments. Interestingly, he also questions the authority of Unesco. In one of many polemics, he says: “At the same time as its role in protecting culture has become suffocated by national interests, Unesco now appears to operate on the premise that any wartime damage should be undone.”

The Value of Art by Michael Findlay (Prestel)

This updated version of The Value of Art, first published in 2012, features important new material, focusing on, for instance, the rise of NFTs. Findlay asks, “where are the NFT art critics?… there is little discourse on the relative aesthetic qualities of the images themselves”. He also has strong opinions on “protest art”, saying: “In very broad terms, artists represent the protesting class while collectors represent the museum trustee class, and while the cultural ecosystem needs both, on issues of social justice they are often on different sides of the barricades.”

The Art of Activism and the Activism of Art by Gregory Sholette (Lund Humphries)

As a key member of the activist group Gulf Labor Coalition, Gregory Sholette has a unique perspective. Sholette examines this fascinating subject “from the perspective of an artist and activist who has been active in the field since the 1980s,” writes the art historian Marcus Verhagen in the introduction. This informed analysis spans more than 60 years of art activism, from the Situationist International group of social revolutionaries (1957-72), which directly engaged with the student uprisings in Paris in May 1968, to Black Lives Matter today, which has “unquestionably set a new high bar for protest aesthetics”, Sholette says.


José da Silva, book club co-editor and exhibitions editor

Stop Tanks With Books by Mark Neville (Nazraeli Press)

Neville’s photobook of Ukrainian life before Russia’s invasion in February is both a call to arms—the photographer sent 750 free copies to influential people who might “have it in their power to help Ukraine”—and a stark reminder that Ukraine was already at war in its east, as depicted in the photographs of soldiers manning trenches and checkpoints. However, it is the tender portraits of everyday life—people at the beach, in school, at a rave, eating ice cream—that really bring home the tragedy that has unfolded in Ukraine.

The Baby on the Fire Escape: Creativity, Motherhood and the Mind-Baby Problem by Julie Phillips (W. W. Norton & Company)

While most of the case studies in this book are from the literary world, the opening section on Alice Neel is a searing account of the complexities of balancing (or not) being a mother and an artist—and the often heavy price women pay. Neel, for example, can sometimes come across as brutal and uncaring, but these labels would rarely be used to describe an artist father in the same situation. Neel said that for much of her life she felt she “didn’t have the right to paint because I had two sons”. The book explores the difficult issues around the subject with no judgment and or neat conclusions—and is all the richer for it.

Raphael by David Ekserdjian, Tom Henry et al. (National Gallery Global Ltd)

If you missed the standout Raphael show at London’s National Gallery earlier this year, its catalogue is the next best thing. The rich imagery and texts make it the perfect coffee table book for art history buffs to dip into over the holiday season. There are also tasty titbits to tell the family over Christmas lunch, such as the belief that the Vatican’s foundations began cracking at news of Raphael’s death. Or when Munich’s Alte Pinakothek sold Raphael’s masterpiece Bindo Altoviti because it was believed at the time to have been painted by his assistant Giulio Romano, to buy what turned out to be a discredited Matthias Grünewald…

Aerial Views: Braga In Northwestern Portugal

Mesmerizing Time – Braga is a city in the far north of Portugal, northeast of Porto. It’s known for its religious heritage and events. To the east, Bom Jesus do Monte complex has a neoclassical church atop an elaborate 17-flight stairway. In the city center, medieval Braga Cathedral is home to a sacred art museum and the Gothic-style Kings’ Chapel. Nearby, the imposing Archbishop’s Palace overlooks Santa Barbara Garden.

Homes: Interior Designers Transform Same Bedroom

Architectural Digest – We gave interior designers Lula Galeano, Laura Hodges, and Alvin Wayne a photo of the spacious bedroom – then asked each of them to create a design for it in their particular style, however they pleased. Three artists, one canvas, each bringing something different to space. See which designer comes closest to creating the bedroom you see in your dreams.

Books: London Review Of Books – December 15, 2022

Laleh Khalili · LRB

London Review of Books (LRB) – December 15, 2022:

In Clover: What does McKinsey do?

When McKinsey Comes to Town: The Hidden Influence of the World’s Most Powerful Consulting Firm by Walt Bogdanich and Michael Forsythe.

The primary product sold by all management consultants – both software developers and strategic organisers – is the theology of capital. This holds that workers are expendable. They can be replaced by machines, or by harder-working employees grateful they weren’t let go in the last round of redundancies. Managers are necessary to the functioning of corporations – or universities, or non-profit organisations – and the more of them the better.

Down among the Press Lords

Writing about the press by Andrew O’Hagan, Ross McKibbin, Jenny Diski, James Meek, Suzanne Moore, Mary-Kay Wilmers, Alan Rusbridger, Thomas Nagel and Raymond Williams.

Top Architectural Tours: Waikopua House, Waiheke Island In New Zealand

The Local Project (December 6, 2022) – On the far side of Waiheke Island – just off the coast of Auckland, New Zealand – a cabin house becomes an escape for its occupants, offering unparalleled views of the island and ocean.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Wooden Cabin House 00:37 – The Meaning and History Behind Waikopua 01:17 – The Original Weatherboard Bach 01:48 – A Walkthrough of the Cabin House 02:15 – Establishing Relationships Between Architect and Builder 02:37 – A Reflection of the Beach 03:35 – A Special Customised Feature 03:54 – The Method Behind the Design 04:26 – Controlling the Light 04:51 – A Durable and Evolving Material Palette 05:35 – Dash’s Collaboration Method

With architecture and interior design from Daniel Marshall Architects (DMA) and construction by Dash Build, Waikopua reinstalls a resilience through its built form and establishes a connection to the surrounding land. Originally a colonial farming site, DMA and Dash Build relay a connection to the site’s history by positioning the cabin house to embrace the green life that surrounds it.

Forming the design moving forward, the foliage and island landscape provide the basis for the modern and sculptural extensions of the home. Referencing the home’s previous iteration, the architect and builder have employed the same aluminium louvers and double-height space of the original home. With the consistency of interior design choices and detailing of weatherboards, a refined touch seamlessly transpires through each room and building.

Inspired by the idea of a campsite, the Waiheke Island cabin house takes the forms of separate accommodation units. The main pavilion houses the kitchen, living and dining rooms downstairs, whilst upstairs provides a shared bunk room and bedrooms that are detailed with honeyed timber accents to further relay the connection to the surrounds. Located just behind the main pavilions, the guest house is a separate living area, allowing for a sense of a privacy within the campsite-inspired layout. Nestled between the main pavilions, a weatherboard and concrete deck allows for an informal gathering space where guests can relax and enjoy the island life.

From entrance, the driveway becomes the focal point, used as both a guide for guests and allowing for unencumbered sightlines down to the ocean. To embrace natural light, DMA and Dash Build employed elements upon the exterior of the home to harness the changing sunlight. Able to be admired from sea, large louvered fins have been fixed at a set angle to stop the harsher light of day from coming in and provide the owners a space of reprieve.

Moreover, the materials used upon the exterior have been selected for durability against the intense environment of salt spray and the changing weather. From the black weatherboards that blend with the fauna to the tiles that reference the surrounding rockface, Waikopua by DMA and Dash Build evolves and further embeds itself into the landscape over time.

World’s Best Classic Cars: 1955 Porsche 356 Pre-A

ClassicDriver (December 6, 2022) – This stunning piece of automotive sculpture is a 1955 Porsche 356, and as the eagle-eyed among you will notice, this particular car is a very rare Pre-A model. As some of the earliest cars Porsche ever built, these Pre-A 356s were once disregarded by enthusiasts in favour of the faster and more modern 356 B and C models. However, what the Pre-A 356s lacked in outright pace, they made up for with their undeniable purity of design. We think you’ll agree, this particular example is quite the looker. 

Aging: Healthy Longevity Journal – December 2022

Image

December 2022 issue:

Long COVID and older people

Long COVID is a poorly understood condition, with a wide spectrum of effects on multiple body systems and variable presentation in different individuals. Long COVID is of particular concern among older people (ie, aged 65 years or older), who are at greater risk than younger people of persisting symptoms associated with COVID-19. In addition, COVID-19 might trigger or exacerbate chronic conditions that occur commonly in older people, such as cardiovascular diseases, respiratory diseases, neurodegenerative conditions, and functional decline.

Quantum Healthy Longevity for healthy people, planet, and growth

It is widely thought that lifespans are increasing globally. However, life expectancy has begun to stagnate in the UK, and is falling in more than 50 countries including the USA. Lifespan stagnation or decrease is a consequence of socioeconomic inequalities, lifestyle factors, and the COVID-19 pandemic. In the UK, the National Health Service spends vast sums treating chronic diseases; by some estimates, 40% of its costs go to treating preventable conditions.

Is age-related hearing loss a potentially modifiable risk factor for dementia?

The relationship of measures of age-related hearing loss such as pure-tone autiometry might not be as consistently associated with risk of dementia as previous studies have suggested. Peripheral age-related hearing loss has been posited as a midlife risk factor for dementia.

Front Page: The New York Times – December 6, 2022

Ukraine Targets Bases Deep in Russia, Showing Expanded Reach

Launching drones at air bases 300 miles from its own territory, Ukraine changed the geography of the war. It said it had developed drones with a range of over 600 miles.

In Forests Full of Mines, Ukrainians Find Mushrooms and Resilience

These misty and damp parts of the country have long beckoned to mushroom hunters with the promise of plenty, but now peril, too, lies beneath the earth’s surface.

Supreme Court Seems Ready to Back Web Designer Opposed to Same-Sex Marriage

The justices are expected to settle a question left open in 2018: how to reconcile claims of religious liberty with laws barring discrimination based on sexual orientation.

In Forests Full of Mines, Ukrainians Find Mushrooms and Resilience

These misty and damp parts of the country have long beckoned to mushroom hunters with the promise of plenty, but now peril, too, lies beneath the earth’s surface.