Tag Archives: Classic Driver Magazine

World’s Best Classic Cars: 1955 Porsche 356 Pre-A

ClassicDriver (December 6, 2022) – This stunning piece of automotive sculpture is a 1955 Porsche 356, and as the eagle-eyed among you will notice, this particular car is a very rare Pre-A model. As some of the earliest cars Porsche ever built, these Pre-A 356s were once disregarded by enthusiasts in favour of the faster and more modern 356 B and C models. However, what the Pre-A 356s lacked in outright pace, they made up for with their undeniable purity of design. We think you’ll agree, this particular example is quite the looker. 

Classic Car Race Festivals: 2022 Goodwood Revival

After a year of mind-blowing car events, it was fantastic to return to Goodwood Motor Circuit for the 2022 Goodwood Revival. As ever, the first thing that hits you upon entering the UK’s foremost classic car festival is the atmosphere.

With pristine vintage metal and immaculately prepared period outfits swirling around Goodwood’s picturesque grounds, the only giveaway that we weren’t in fact back in the 1960s was the flurry of smartphones held aloft to capture the weekend’s most unforgettable moments. Of course, we had to join in ourselves, and so we present to you our favourite memories from this year’s Revival.

This year, Ferrari celebrated its 75th anniversary, and what better place could there be to showcase Scuderia’s finest race cars than the Goodwood Revival? Lining up on the grid this weekend were some of the greatest racing machines of all time, including two Le Mans winners – the Ferrari 166 MM Barchetta that won the 24 Hours in 1949 and the Ferrari 275 P that claimed an overall win at the Circuit de la Sarthe in 1963 and 1964.

As part of the tribute, Graham Hill’s son and fellow F1 World Champion, Damon Hill, took to the track in ‘Old Faithful’, the 1962 title-winning BRM P578, among a cavalcade of cars from Graham Hill’s illustrious motorsport career. A fitting tribute to one of history’s greatest drivers, especially as Saturday was Damon’s birthday!

Italian Design: 90 Years Of ‘Pininfarina’ Celebrated

The world’s most famous automotive design house, Pininfarina celebrates 90 years of style and innovation with a new exhibition at the MAUTO in Turin, open from May to September.

Founded in 1930, Pininfarina has evolved from an artisan concern to a global brand employing over 600 people. In those 90 years Pininfarina has given us some of the world’s most beautiful automobiles, but also demonstrated exciting innovation. Divided up in to six areas the exhibition will showcase the unique breadth of the brand from the gorgeous Cisitalia 2020, to the 1969 Sigma Grand Prix and off into the future with the exciting new Battista, electric hypercar concept.

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Classic Car Roadtrip: 1968 Renault 8 Gordini – Lisbon To Algarve In Portugal

In the late 1960s, Portuguese racing driver Heitor de Moraes took his Renault 8 Gordini from Corsica to Poland, rallying all across Europe. Now, the ocean blue car has found a new owner and a new sportive duty – carrying surfboards in style from Lisbon to the Algarve.

22 January 2021

The year was 1968: six years before the so-called ‘Carnation Revolution’. Life in Portugal at that time could be tough. Not for Heitor de Moraes, though: this was the year he became the first owner of a pretty special blue car. Fast-forward to 2020, and another chapter of the car’s history was written, with its third owner also driving it along the curving roads of southern Portugal. Only this time, with surfboards on the roof.

The car was purchased from Timeless Garage in Lisbon (which had carried out a full restoration) and that’s why the story you see in the pictures starts there. A few days later, after some small mechanical corrections and a surfboard roof rack installation, the real mission began: the blue car hit the curves of the Algarve once again. It quickly became clear that even after more than 50 years, Amédée Gordini’s great engineering talent still shines through.

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Art & Auto Racing: French Artist Yan Denes’ “Blur & Movement Of The 1960’s”

“My primary era is clearly the ’60s,” he says. “For these scenes, I use period photos with the agreement of their photographer and allow myself some freedom on the framing, for example. I like racing cars, and if they have flaws or imperfections, I represent them faithfully, of course.”

“My master is Leonardo da Vinci, who is the ultimate reference in drawing because of his mastery of blur and movement,” he says. “There’s an indeterminate aspect to these drawings that’s essential. It reminds me of Picasso’s famous phrase ‘finishing a drawing, what a horror’ – that’s exactly it, I always leave an area of blur and a part of emptiness. The viewer fills that space with their experience, their story. In this way, a drawing is simply an exchange – an encounter between two people.”

Few artists, like Yan Denes, understand how to make the thrill of speed tangible for the observer with pen and paper. Not only did he design Scuderia Ferrari’s anniversary helmets in Formula 1, but he is also inspired by historic motorsport.

While the vast majority of Denes’ commissions come from owners of modern Ferrari race cars such as the 360 Challenge, 430 GT2, 488 GT3 and FXX, Yan is actually better known for his passion for historic racing scenes.

It has to be said that Denes is a virtuoso when it comes to transcribing speed and movement.

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Classic Cars: Restoring The ‘Finest Jaguars’ At CKL Developments In Engand

“It’s a privilege to work with these fantastic cars,” enthuses James “and we benefit from incredible craftsmen and Chris’ vast experience. These are important cars, looked after sympathetically. When we restore cars, we’re careful and fastidious in retaining the soul, but we also understand that cars evolve”.

In keeping with the colour British Racing Green, CKL Developments prides itself on being understated, not flashy. Inside a pristine brace of high-roofed, modern industrial units near Hastings, in Britain’s East Sussex countryside, you’ll find cars that are maintained to be enjoyed, driven and raced.

CKL is not, the team is at pains to point out, a museum. It’s the absolute authority on Jaguar-engined sports cars of the ’50s and ’60s and looks after some of the most historic and important British cars of that era, sympathetically restored, preserved of soul and performing at their zenith. The team can service, restore, repair, prepare, race, build, sell, store and transport your pride and joy as required.

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Classics: The Golden Age Of 1950’s Italian Tiny Cars

You can’t measure style with a tape measure, and that applies to people and collector cars alike. A true automotive style icon will be celebrated at the next Aste Bolaffi auction on 16 October. Firstly, the catalogue contains numerous rare variations of small Italian cars.

There is a Fiat 600 Zagato Tipo L from 1956 finished in metallic red and cream two-tone paintwork, a contemporary luxury version of the otherwise modest city runabout. The Fiat Abarth 595 and the two Jolly versions of the Fiat 500 built by Carrozzeria Ghia are also desirable. 

It wasn’t only Fiat producing extremely charming microcars in the post-War period, however. The 49 lots in the auction also include a Bianchina Trasformabile, a Heinkel cabin scooter, a Gogomobil, a Mivalino, an Amica tricycle and a Ferves 50 Ranger, which can be considered the ancestor to the Fiat Panda 4×4 we so adore. You can find our favourites from the sale listed below or, alternatively, browse the entire catalogue in the Classic Driver Market

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Greatest Cars Of All Time: “1961 Jaguar E-Type” (Video)

‘Project ZP’ proved the Jaguar E-type was as fast as it looked.

Although the response to the E-type was frenzied, Jaguar knew that more than a pretty face was required to secure the model’s future. Under the veil of ‘Project ZP’, seven of the earliest E-types were transformed into racers. And this particular car stands today as the best of the bunch…

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Classics: “1959 BMW 507 Series II” – Amazing Story Behind The “Perfect Car”

From Classic Driver Magazine (April 18, 2020):

1959 BMW 507 Series II Interior“Astonishing” is the word we are looking to describe this BMW 507. A word we use a lot if it comes to selling classic cars, but only a little few deserve this ‘title’ like this 507 does. When an exceptional model, with an unique story, from what the historical documents are well archieved, it just makes us going crazy. Add matching numbers and -colors tot his list and we are losing it totally. That’s no different with this 507.

1959 BMW 507 Series II FrontMax Hoffman convinced BMW that if they built a competitor to the Mercedes-Benz 300SL, he would sell it profitable in the United States. The BMW was intended to fill the gap between the affordable sports cars like the triumph and MG and the exclusive cars like the Mercedes-Benz 300SL and Ferrari 250 GT California. Though, BMW couldn’t achieve their target price, for what the BMW 507 was even more expensive than the 300SL. BMW found itself in a financial difficult situation and almost went bankrupt. At the end of the day, BMW recovered from this “failure” and the 507 even became a true flagship in the whole history of automotive.

Classic Driver MagazineIn the ‘50s BMW disposed over all fundamental ingredients which would make the 507 complete. An all-aluminium 3.2-litre V8 engine was placed in a shortened chassis of the 502. This ingenious masterpiece produced no less than 150hp and sounds like a guitar solo in your ears. To save weigt, the body was made of aluminium, which results in a 1280kg’s for a fully finished 507. Besides the phenomenal results, BMW wanted to offer luxury as well. Both aspects are just spot on.

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American Classic Cars: “1948 Packard Standard Eight Station Sedan”

1948 Packard Standard Eight Station Sedan Interior Classic DriverPackard Super Eight was the name given to the larger of the two eight-cylinder luxury automobiles produced by the Packard Motor Car Company of Detroit, Michigan. It shared frames and some body types with the top model Packard Twelve. Following the discontinuation of the Seventeenth Series Packard Twelve after the 1939 model year, a new Super Eight One-Eighty was derived from the Super Eight as the new top car range. The Super Eight was renamed the Packard Super Eight One-Sixty.

Classic Driver logoAfter 1942, Packard concentrated on the new Clipper styling that was developed for an upper-class sedan the previous year. There were Super Clippers and Custom Super Clipper in the One-Sixty and One-Eighty tradition until 1947. After a heavy facelift, the name Clipper was dropped. The most senior Super Eight One-Eighty became the Custom Eight, while its slightly lower-priced sibling, the Super Eight One-Sixty, once again became simply the Super Eight. Clipper Custom Super Eights and Custom Eights were very close relatives to their respective Super models, distinguished outside by the lack of an eggcrate grille and small rear chrome trim moulding under the trunk lid on Supers. In 1949, a new Super Eight Deluxe was added to the line. This car had also the Custom Eight’s eggcrate grille, but not the rear trim.

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From Wikipedia