Tag Archives: 1950’s

Classics: ‘Some Like It Hot’ – Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis & Jack Lemon (1959)

After witnessing a Mafia murder, slick saxophone player Joe (Tony Curtis) and his long-suffering buddy, Jerry (Jack Lemmon), improvise a quick plan to escape from Chicago with their lives. Disguising themselves as women, they join an all-female jazz band and hop a train bound for sunny Florida. While Joe pretends to be a millionaire to win the band’s sexy singer, Sugar (Marilyn Monroe), Jerry finds himself pursued by a real millionaire (Joe E. Brown) as things heat up and the mobsters close in.

Some Like It Hot (1959)

Directed by: Billy Wilder

Written by: Billy Wilder and I.A.L. Diamond

Cast: Marilyn Monroe, Tony Curtis, Jack Lemmon

Views: A ‘1950 Hudson Commodore Eight Convertible Brougham’

1950 Hudson Commodore Eight Convertible Brougham

Lot Location: Tilburg, Netherlands

Hudson’s step-down cars for 1948 marked a new direction for the company, as it had a partially unitary design, with the floor pan on the bottom of the frame rather than on the top, resulting in one literally stepping down to enter a Hudson. There was an all-new six-cylinder engine, but the legacy straight eight, which had been continually updated since its introduction in the 1930s, was also carried over. Its low center of gravity made for excellent handling, for which step-downs are still revered.

The new cars bowed on December 7, 1947. “You’re face to face with tomorrow,” said the ads, and “this time it’s Hudson.” Both dealers and the public were elated. The roof was low, but there was still plenty of room inside. Sales jumped nearly 50 percent over 1947, and Hudson rose from 13th to 11th place in the market.

Incremental internal improvements were made to the engines for 1949, and for 1950 the grilles and taillights were updated. Genuine leather was used on convertible interiors, and an electro-hydraulic power top and windows were standard.

Classic Cars: Restoring The ‘Finest Jaguars’ At CKL Developments In Engand

“It’s a privilege to work with these fantastic cars,” enthuses James “and we benefit from incredible craftsmen and Chris’ vast experience. These are important cars, looked after sympathetically. When we restore cars, we’re careful and fastidious in retaining the soul, but we also understand that cars evolve”.

In keeping with the colour British Racing Green, CKL Developments prides itself on being understated, not flashy. Inside a pristine brace of high-roofed, modern industrial units near Hastings, in Britain’s East Sussex countryside, you’ll find cars that are maintained to be enjoyed, driven and raced.

CKL is not, the team is at pains to point out, a museum. It’s the absolute authority on Jaguar-engined sports cars of the ’50s and ’60s and looks after some of the most historic and important British cars of that era, sympathetically restored, preserved of soul and performing at their zenith. The team can service, restore, repair, prepare, race, build, sell, store and transport your pride and joy as required.

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Classic Cars: The ‘1955 Chevrolet Bel Air’ (Video)

The 1955 Chevrolet (sometimes referred to as ‘55 Chevy) is an automobile which was introduced by Chevrolet in Autumn 1954 for the 1955 model year. It is considered a huge turning point for the manufacturer and a major success. It was available in three models: the 150, 210, and Bel Air.

The ’55’s top trim offering was the Bel-Air, which had more chrome than the 150 or 210. The Bel-Air, 210 and 150 model could be bought as a four-door, or could be bought as a two door with a post between the front and rear passenger windows, known as the two-door sedan.

The Bel-Air or 210 model could also be had as a two door with no post between the side windows. This was known as the sport coupe, or better known by collectors as “the two door hardtop”. Since this model had no post between the two side windows, it had a shorter roof and longer rear deck than the two door sedan had. Chevy also offered a convertible, with the same shorter roof and longer rear deck as the sport coupe, and it was offered in Bel-Air trim only.

1955 also saw the introduction of the Bel Air Nomad, a sporty two-door station wagon which featured frameless door glass and elongated side windows. The unique roof design of the Nomad came directly from the 1954 Corvette Nomad, a “dream car” designed to be shown at auto shows as a concept sport wagon. Although regarded as one of the most beautiful station wagon designs of Fifties, the Nomad sold poorly, partly due to its price tag (one of the most expensive models in the Bel Air lineup) as well as its lack of four doors. Also the Nomad’s two-piece tailgate design was prone to let excess rainwater leak through to the interior.

The ’55 offered a wide array of colors. One solid color, which was standard for the 150, could be had for the 210 or Bel Air…or nineteen different two-tone color combinations were also available.

Tours: ‘Lew House’ – A 1958 Mid-Century Modern In Los Angeles By Architect Richard Neutra (Video)

Richard Neutra designed the Lew House in 1958 to suit his clients’ entertaining lifestyle with an open floor plan, wall-to-wall glazing, and a gleaming glass carport. High up and overlooking Downtown Los Angeles, this legendary home features stunning views, an innovative floor plan, and a minimalist, but warm interior. Dwell’s own executive editor Jenny Xie gives us a tour.

The Lew House is an exquisite, four-bedroom luxury residence in Hollywood about a mile from Sunset Strip. Designed by Richard Neutra, renowned pioneer of midcentury modern architecture, the villa is practically a museum of modernist design and contemporary art, while welcoming deluxe relaxation and festive entertainment in its stunning indoor and outdoor living areas.

The tri-level villa overlooks gorgeous views of the Hollywood Hills from multiple balconies and terraces. Savor luxurious days bathing in the swimming pool, soaking in the lovely hot tub, and sipping refreshing drinks in the Southern California sun. Fire up the grill for a delicious barbeque as the kids play in the yard and playground below; then gather for an alfresco lunch. In the late afternoon, savor a delicious cocktail on the veranda.

New Photography Books: ‘Dogs – Walter Chandoha’, 1941-1991 (Taschen 2020)

We see terriers, collies, beagles, bloodhounds, poodles, small dogs, big dogs, show dogs, working dogs, and many more, featuring over 60 breeds photographed in both black-and-white and glorious Kodachrome.

TASCHEN

The world appears to be divided into cat and dog lovers, but fortunately Walter Chandoha, the 20th century’s greatest pet photographer found himself happily in the middle. He loved these intriguing creatures equally for their unique beauty and individualism, and as subjects to photograph in a career spanning over 70 years. While working on his critically acclaimed TASCHEN book CatsChandoha handpicked his favorite dog photos for a potential follow-up title, putting into carefully marked boxes hundreds of contact sheets, prints, and color transparencies, many unseen for at least 50 years, and some totally unseen.

Chandoha sadly passed away in 2019 at the age of 98, but his legacy lives on in this dashing sequel dedicated to man’s best friend. “Walter Chandoha’s photographs of dogs are compelling not just because dogs have an inherent charm, but because the person behind the camera was a master of his craft,” writes the photography critic Jean Dykstra in the book’s introduction.

Spanning a 50-year period, the book is divided into six sections, and each chapter reveals Chandoha’s exceptional combination of technique, versatility, and soul. The opening chapter “In the Studio” focuses on formal portraiture; next it’s “Strike a Pose” where our canine companions ham it up for the camera; in “Out and About” they get to roam and play, often photographed with Chandoha’s own children; next it’s “Best in Show” with Chandoha using his reportage skills to capture vintage dog shows from the Mad Men era; in “Tails from the City, the dogs are hitting the streets of mid-century New York; and in the closing chapter “Country Dogs, it’s back to nature, the fields, and the beaches. Dogs is an unleashed photographic tribute to these lovable and loyal creatures.

The photographer

Walter Chandoha (1920–2019) was a combat photographer in the Second World War, before a chance encounter with a cat led him on a path that would shape his professional career. He is regarded as the world’s greatest domestic animal photographer with a career spanning over seven decades and an archive of more than 200,000 photographs. His photographs have appeared on over 300 magazine covers, thousands of advertisements, and were regularly featured in magazines such as LifeLook, and their equivalents around the world.

The editor

Reuel Golden is the former editor of the British Journal of Photography and the Photography editor at TASCHEN. His TASCHEN titles include: Mick Rock: The Rise of David Bowie, both London and New York Portrait of a City books, Andy Warhol. PolaroidsThe Rolling Stones, Her Majesty, Football in the 1970s, the National Geographic editions, and The David Bailey SUMO.

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Classic Cars: 1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner Convertible (Video)

On “My Car Story” we’re in the West Suburbs of Chicago IL on 11-5-20. We’re looking at a 1957 Ford Fairlane 500 Skyliner Convertible in Flame Red & Raven Black Paint. The car comes with the factory 292 CI V8 “Y Block” engine. The car’s Owner is Don Walters. Don’s had this car since 2000. He shares he had one like this when he met his wife. The car features the “Retractable Top” and Don shares back in the 1950’s known as the “Hideaway Hard Top”. He found this one in a junk yard and did all the restoration work himself in four years. Don uses this car as his daily driver.

Legendary Automobiles: The ‘Alpha Romeo B.A.T. Concept Cars’ Of 1953-55

Perhaps the most incredible thing that could be said about the B.A.T. series is that the fantastical design is actually functional, with all three examples exhibiting drag coefficient figures that would still land them in the top ten most aerodynamic cars on sale today. Their extreme forms are, in fact, functional.

Predictably, the B.A.T. concepts made a huge splash on the international motor show circuit, leading to Scaglione’s two greatest hits in terms of production figures – the NSU Sport Prinz and Alfa Romeo Giulietta Sprint. Unfortunately, the B.A.T. concepts would also mark an inflection point for Bertone and Scaglione’s working relationship.

Scaglione’s daughter Giovanna describes it, “Bertone was a little bothered when it happened that in a magazine article they wrote about Franco Scaglione and not Bertone… For example, in an article speaking of one of his works [Scaglione’s] name was mentioned three times and the name of Bertone was mentioned only once…” Though Giovanna does not attribute her father’s sudden departure from the firm to this incident alone, it was clear that Scaglione wanted to strike out on his own, so that year, he handed over the title of chief stylist to Giorgetto Giugiaro and left Bertone for good.

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Classics: The Golden Age Of 1950’s Italian Tiny Cars

You can’t measure style with a tape measure, and that applies to people and collector cars alike. A true automotive style icon will be celebrated at the next Aste Bolaffi auction on 16 October. Firstly, the catalogue contains numerous rare variations of small Italian cars.

There is a Fiat 600 Zagato Tipo L from 1956 finished in metallic red and cream two-tone paintwork, a contemporary luxury version of the otherwise modest city runabout. The Fiat Abarth 595 and the two Jolly versions of the Fiat 500 built by Carrozzeria Ghia are also desirable. 

It wasn’t only Fiat producing extremely charming microcars in the post-War period, however. The 49 lots in the auction also include a Bianchina Trasformabile, a Heinkel cabin scooter, a Gogomobil, a Mivalino, an Amica tricycle and a Ferves 50 Ranger, which can be considered the ancestor to the Fiat Panda 4×4 we so adore. You can find our favourites from the sale listed below or, alternatively, browse the entire catalogue in the Classic Driver Market

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Great Books Podcast: ‘The Old Man And The Sea’ By Ernest Hemingway (1951)

The Great Books presents: John J. Miller is joined by Missy Andrews of the Center for Literary Education to discuss Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea.

The Old Man and the Sea is a short novel written by the American author Ernest Hemingway in 1951 in Cuba, and published in 1952. It was the last major work of fiction written by Hemingway that was published during his lifetime. One of his most famous works, it tells the story of Santiago, an aging Cuban fisherman who struggles with a giant marlin far out in the Gulf Stream off the coast of Cuba.