Norway Views: Bergen’s ‘Gingerbread Town’ (2022)

DW Travel – An entire city made of nearly 2,000 gingerbread houses? Yum! Every year, right around Christmas, the residents of Bergen build this sweet city out of the traditional European Christmas pastry on the southwest coast of Norway. It can be enjoyed up until the end of December. Have you ever tried gingerbread?

Bergen is a city on Norway’s southwestern coast. It’s surrounded by mountains and fjords, including Sognefjord, the country’s longest and deepest. Bryggen features colorful wooden houses on the old wharf, once a center of the Hanseatic League’s trading empire. The Fløibanen Funicular goes up Fløyen Mountain for panoramic views and hiking trails. The Edvard Grieg House is where the renowned composer once lived.

Top Design Fairs: Walking Tour Of Design Miami 2022

VernissageTV (December 2, 2022) – Design Miami 2022 in Miami Beach, Florida, presents the 18th edition of its design fair. Design Miami features 50 gallery and Curio exhibitions. This is a walkthrough of the show, which features works by designers and artists such as Arthur Elrod, Jean Royère, Charlotte Perriand, Pierre Jeanneret, George Nakashima, Drift, Andile Dyalvane, and Lin Fanglu.

Reviews: Best Crime And Thriller Books Of 2022

The Guardian (December 3, 2022)-

The Bullet That Missed by Richard Osman 9780241512425

Given the relentlessly grim nature of the news this year, it’s hardly surprising that escapism in the form of cosy crime continues to challenge traditional crime/thriller bestsellers, with Richard Osman’s third Thursday Murder Club mystery, The Bullet That Missed (Viking), riding high in the charts. The last 12 months have seen a bumper crop of excellent books at the cosy end of the spectrum, from Ajay Chowdhury’s second crime novel, The Cook (Harvill Secker), set against the backdrop of an east London curry house, to veteran Canadian author Louise Penny’s 18th Armand Gamache novel, A World of Curiosities (Hodder & Stoughton).

A World of Curiosities by Louise Penny

Inventiveness appears to be on the rise, too. Janice Hallett’s second novel, The Twyford Code (Viper), told in transcribed audio files retrieved from an iPhone, succeeds in being fiendishly clever and very moving. Authors such as Gillian McAllister, whose Wrong Place Wrong Time (Michael Joseph) is an ingeniously plotted murder mystery in which time travels backwards, and Gabino Iglesias, whose high-octane southern noir thriller The Devil Takes You Home (Wildfire) has supernatural elements, are also giving the genre a welcome shot in the arm. Others have approached familiar tropes from new angles: the main character in CS Robertson’s The Undiscovered Deaths of Grace McGill (Hodder & Stoughton) is not a cop but a “death cleaner”.

A Heart Full of Headstones 9781398709355

Recent revelations have meant that the British public’s growing distrust of the police is very much a part of the UK’s permacrisis. Ian Rankin, creator of maverick cop John Rebus, commented recently that there are “big questions” for authors who write police procedurals. “In the current state of the world, how can you write about a police officer and make them the goody, when we look around us and see that so often the police are not the goodies?” In his latest Rebus novel, the splendid A Heart Full of Headstones (Orion), an officer who has been charged with domestic violence tries to make a deal by stitching up dodgy colleagues.

The year has been punctuated by the collective groans of crime fiction critics as the results of yet another male celebrity’s lockdown diversion landed on their doormats (presumably the female celebrities were too busy home schooling). The most impressive of these is Frankie Boyle’s Meantime (John Murray): set in Glasgow during the aftermath of the 2014 referendum on Scottish independence, it’s both funny and moving.

More Than You'll Ever Know 9780241529980 Hardback

There have been plenty of excellent non-celebrity debuts. Standouts include Patrick Worrall’s complex spy thriller The Partisan (Transworld); Conner Habib’s Hawk Mountain (Transworld), a paranoid and unsettling tale of masculinity in crisis; and Wake (Hodder & Stoughton), Australian newcomer Shelley Burr’s sensitive exploration of the aftermath of trauma in a parched outback town. Katie Gutierrez’s More Than You’ll Ever Know (Michael Joseph) is an intelligent and nuanced examination of the complicated relationship between a true-crime writer and her subject, a female bigamist. And The Maid by Nita Prose (HarperCollins) will have you rooting for its titular heroine, neurodivergent Molly, as she finds herself caught up in a web of deception at the fancy Regency Grand Hotel.

Maror by Lavie Tidhar

There have been strong additions to other long-running and well-loved police series, such as Give Unto Others (Hutchinson Heinemann), the 31st novel to feature Donna Leon’s Commissario Brunetti, and The Murder Book (Little, Brown), 18th outing for Mark Billingham’s Tom Thorne. More recent additions to the police procedural canon include Elly Griffith’s DI Harbinder Kaur, who had her third outing in Bleeding Heart Yard (Quercus), and Alan Parks’s shambolic, mid-70s Glaswegian detective Harry McCoy, who had his fifth in May God Forgive (Canongate). Maror by Lavie Tidhar (Apollo), an epic, multi-generational thriller set in Israel, with an enigmatic cop at its centre, is also well worth the read.

Highlights in historical crime include Blue Water (Viper) by Leonora Nattrass, a shipboard thriller set in 1794, and The Lost Man of Bombay (Hodder & Stoughton), the third in Vaseem Khan’s excellent series set in post-partition India. Alternative history has been well served by the thoroughly chilling Queen High (Quercus), CJ Carey’s sequel to last year’s superb Widowland, which imagines a postwar Britain under Nazi rule.

Breaking Point by Olivier Norek (MacLehose)

Although translated crime fiction seems thinner on the ground at the moment, the quality is high: standouts include Olivier Norek’s impressive policier Breaking Point (MacLehose, translated from French by Nick Caister) and Antti Tuomainen’s delightfully funny The Moose Paradox (Orenda, translated from Finnish by David Hackston). All in all, the genre seems in good shape: a broader church, less formulaic and more exciting.

Cover Preview: Barron’s Magazine – Dec 5, 2022

Magazine - Latest Issue - Barron's

@barronsonline December 5, 2022 issue:

A Big Chill Is Here for the Housing Market. Next Year Could Bring More Trouble.

Affordability is still an issue, mortgage rates will remain high, and homes are sitting on the market longer. It all adds up to a stalled 2023 for real estate.

Strong Job Numbers Throw Cold Water on Hopes for End to Rate Rises

The Fed’s Inflation Fight Must Cause More Pain—to the Job Market

Another Bad Sign for Tech Stocks—Cloud Spending Is Fading

Wall Street Isn’t Fond of T. Rowe Price, but Maybe You Should Be

Views: Charlottenburg Palace 2022 Christmas Market, Berlin, Germany

Christmas Market 2022 at Charlottenburg Palace, Berlin Germany. Schloss Charlottenburg is a Baroque palace in Berlin, located in Charlottenburg, a district of the Charlottenburg-Wilmersdorf borough. The palace was built at the end of the 17th century and was greatly expanded during the 18th century. It includes much lavish internal decoration in baroque and rococo styles

Video timeline: 0:00 Highlights 3:20 Pasta from Cheese Wheel 4:52 Grilled Salmon on Bread Roll 5:31 Trdelnik Spit Cake 6:15 Chocolate Crepes 7:46 3-Minutes Light Show

Politics: Democrats Shift Primaries, Railroad Strike

PBS NewsHour (December 2, 2022) – New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the Democrats’ plan to shakeup the road to the White House, President Biden and Congress halt a potential railroad strike and lawmakers shield gay marriage.

Front Page: The New York Times – December 3, 2022

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U.S. Job Growth Remains Strong, Defying Fed’s Rate Strategy

Employers added 263,000 workers in November, even as some industries showed signs of a slowdown. Wage growth exceeded expectations.

As Officials Ease Covid Restrictions, China Faces New Pandemic Risks

Huge swaths of the nation’s elderly remain vulnerable, scientists say, and a surge in deaths and hospitalizations may be inevitable.

As Macron Loses His Sheen at Home, Harmonious U.S. Visit Is ‘Regenerative’

President Emmanuel Macron, dealing with a difficult start to his second term, can return to France feeling buoyed by a warm reception and unity on Ukraine.

Applying to College, and Trying to Appear ‘Less Asian’

The affirmative action lawsuit against Harvard seemed to confirm advice given for years to Asian Americans: Don’t play chess, don’t check the box declaring race.