Tag Archives: 2022

Green Design: Villa Hotel On Ishigaki Island, Japan

Japanese architecture practice Sou Fujimoto Architects has revealed design for a villa hotel that features an undulating green roof, offering sweeping views on Japan’s Ishigaki Island.

Designed for a Japanese hospitality brand Not A Hotel, the brand’s new vacation homes are set to be built to offer various rentable holiday homes in multiple locations across Japan. 

Fujimoto’s holiday home is located on a tranquil Ishigaki Island, which is 11 minutes by car from New Ishigaki Airport. The vacation home, which gently connects to the earth, is offered visitors who want to spend a quiet time on the island.

Sou Fujimoto reveals villa hotel with undulating roof offering sweeping views on Ishigaki Island

Sou Fujimoto Architects‘ design, made of a circular-shaped structure and a bowl-shaped hilly courtyard, is envisioned like “a small paradise, offering a revelatory experience of earth.”

The circular holiday home on the vast grounds was designed without a front and back façade to be able to offer an uninterrupted views towards its surrounding. 

Sou Fujimoto reveals villa hotel with undulating roof offering sweeping views on Ishigaki Island

“The architecture, which has a vague boundary between the inside and outside and is connected to the earth, is equipped with a living-dining room overlooking the sea and four separate bedrooms that can accommodate up to 10 people,” stated the project’s website. 

Read more

Art Exhibtions: ‘Picasso & Braque – Radicals’ (2022)

Picasso & Braque: Radicals highlights significant work by the two pioneers of the Cubist art movement—Pablo Picasso and Georges Braque. Cubism, one of the most influential artistic developments of the twentieth century, challenged traditional perspectives of how we see the world. The movement is characterized by fractured viewpoints and abstracted forms and defies established notions of three-dimensionality. Cubism can be intellectually challenging but beautifully reflects the dynamism, rhythm, and innovation of the early 1900s.  

Although there is debate on who developed Cubism first, Picasso and Braque are credited with establishing this new visual language that presented infinite possibilities and catalyzed future developments in the visual arts. This exhibition features work by twentieth-century artists who took inspiration from these revolutionary ideas and practices, including American artists Fannie Hillsmith and John Marin, and Texas artist Bill Reily, among others. Paintings, drawings, sculptures, and prints demonstrate how Cubism transcended time and space.

Picasso & Braque: Radicals is organized for the McNay Art Museum by Lyle W. Williams, Curator of Prints and Drawings, Curator of Modern Art; and Rafael Fernando Gutierrez Jr., the inaugural Douglass Foundation Intern in Curatorial Studies.

Journalism: 2022 Whiting Literary Magazine Prizes

2022 Whiting Literary Magazine Prizes.

By Emily Temple – Lithub, July 14, 2022, 9:01am

Today, the Whiting Foundation announced the winners of its 2022 Literary Magazine Prizes, which honor “the most innovative and essential publications at the forefront of American literary culture.” The five winners were chosen—from an initial pool of more than eighty applicants —based on their “excellence in publishing, advocacy for writers, and a unique contribution to the strength of the overall literary community.”

“This prize was designed to create cohorts capable of tackling shared challenges with mettle and imagination, and it’s thrilling to picture the conversations that these terrifically varied magazines will have,” said Courtney Hodell, director of literary programs, in a statement. “We look forward to learning with and from them.”

The 2022 print winners are:

ZYZZYVA (San Francisco, CA), a stalwart West Coast publication with national reach, an exquisitely curated reading experience, and top-notch design.

Medium-Budget Print Prize Winner ($150,000–$500,000 budget)
Total prize: $60,000

Bennington Review (Bennington, VT), a relaunch of an eminent university publication—a visually stunning journal with an imaginative and sophisticated vision that offers hands-on experience to the next generation of editors.

Small-Budget Print Prize Winner (under $150,000 budget)
Total prize: $30,000

American Chordata (Brooklyn, NY), a budding independent magazine full of thought-provoking interplay between text and visual art—a careful assemblage of young writers and artists alongside recognized talents.

Print Development Grantee (under $50,000 budget)
Total prize: $15,000

And the 2022 digital winners are:

Apogee Journal (New York, NY), an incubator for multicultural writers with a finger on the pulse of the literary landscape and an established reputation for publishing stellar up-and-comers.

Digital Prize Winner (under $500,000 budget)
Total prize: $19,500

Electric Literature (Brooklyn, NY), a buzzing concourse for news and ideas publishing compelling essays, short stories with insightful context, and incisive critical coverage of the literary world.

Digital Prize Winner (under $500,000 budget)
Total prize: $19,500

Summer Walks: Oslo In Southern Norway (4K)

Oslo, the capital of Norway, sits on the country’s southern coast at the head of the Oslofjord. It’s known for its green spaces and museums. Many of these are on the Bygdøy Peninsula, including the waterside Norwegian Maritime Museum and the Viking Ship Museum, with Viking ships from the 9th century. The Holmenkollbakken is a ski-jumping hill with panoramic views of the fjord. It also has a ski museum. 

Isle Of Wight Views: 2022 ‘Round The Island Race’

It wasn’t the fastest and a small boat didn’t win, but this year’s Round the Island race was one to remember as a being a classic blast around the Isle of Wight.

The annual Round the Island Race, organised by the Island Sailing Club, is a one-day yacht race around the Isle of Wight, an island situated off the south coast of England. The race regularly attracts over 1,400 boats and around 15,000 sailors, making it one of the largests yacht races in the world and the fourth largest participation sporting event in the UK after the London Marathon and the Great North and South Runs.

Competitors come from all over the UK, other parts of Europe and as far away as the USA to follow the 50 nautical mile course round the Isle of Wight. Starting on the famous Royal Yacht Squadron line in Cowes, the fleet races westabout, to The Needles, round St Catherine’s Point and Bembridge Ledge buoy, and back into the Solent to the finish line at Cowes.

Spectators can find many vantage points, both on the mainland and Isle of Wight, to watch the race progress. Those who cannot get to watch in person can always keep an eye on the race’s progress on the website, via our live text commentary and our boat tracking facility.

Reviews: The Top New Travel Books For 2022


Cover of All the Way to the Tigers by Mary Morris
Anchor
All the Way to the Tigers: A Memoir

By Mary Morris ’77GSAS (2020)

When travel writer and novelist Mary Morris was badly injured in an ice-skating accident, she feared that her life of adventure was over. But a quote from Thomas Mann convinced her otherwise: “He would go on a journey. Not far. Not all the way to the tigers.” Thus began Morris’s three-year-quest — which does take her far, from Brooklyn to the jungles of India — to find a tiger in the wild. Like her much-lauded memoir Nothing to Declare, Morris’s latest book is a thoughtful, spiritual, genre-bending journey. 


Cover of Looking for Transwonderland by Noo Saro-Wiwa
Soft Skull Press
Looking for Transwonderland: Travels in Nigeria 

By Noo Saro-Wiwa ’01JRN (2012)

Noo Saro-Wiwa spent her childhood in the United Kingdom, traveling back to her native Nigeria only on summer vacations. But when she was nineteen, her father, a journalist and activist, was killed by Nigerian police. Saro-Wiwa returned to her homeland to reckon with her father’s legacy and try to understand the history of the nation that killed him. Part memoir, part family history, and part travelogue, it’s an intriguing (and surprisingly funny) look at a very complicated country. 


Cover of Come Fly the World by Julia Cooke
Mariner Books
Come Fly the World: The Jet-Age Story of the Women of Pan Am 

By Julia Cooke ’13SOA (2021)

There’s nothing glamorous about flying these days, so it’s extra fun to tag along with Julia Cooke back to the 1960s, the golden age of air travel, when working as a Pan Am stewardess was peak cool. Cooke tells five such women’s stories, which run the gamut from the enviable (shopping sprees in Paris and beach holidays in the Philippines) to the unbelievable (evading the KGB in Moscow and smuggling a newsreel out of war-torn Pakistan). 


Cover of Letters to Lillian and Travel Notebooks by Meyer Schapiro
Getty Research Institute
Meyer Schapiro Abroad: Letters to Lillian and Travel Notebooks 

By Meyer Schapiro ’24CC, ’35GSAS, edited by Daniel Esterman ’65CC (2009)

Meyer Schapiro is known as one of the twentieth century’s most accomplished art historians. But in 1926 and 1927, he was still a Columbia graduate student, studying abroad in Europe and the Middle East. The letters that he wrote to his then fiancée, Lillian, as well as the notebooks that he kept, are ripe with budding observations on art and politics and represent a fascinating time capsule of intellectual life nearly a century ago.


Cover of Wayfinding by M. R. O'Connor
St. Martin’s Press
Wayfinding: The Science and Mystery of How Humans Navigate the World

By M. R. O’Connor ’08JRN (2019)

Technology has made wayfinding — “the use and organization of sensory information from the environment to guide us” — almost obsolete. But before GPS, or even written maps, humans purposefully traveled great distances across the earth. Journalist M. R. O’Connor draws on disciplines from neuroscience to anthropology to explore how they did it. Her findings are fascinating, and so is her journey to reach them, which takes her to the Arctic tundra, the Australian outback, and the islands of the South Pacific. 


Cover of Secret Brooklyn by Michelle Young
Jonglez Publishing
Secret Brooklyn: An Unusual Guide

By Michelle Young ’12GSAPP and Augustin Pasquet (2019)

Michelle Young, an adjunct professor of architecture at Columbia, is the founder of Untapped New York, a website dedicated to the secret corners and hidden gems of America’s biggest city. So it’s no surprise that her guide to Brooklyn is equally full of treasures — things like the world’s oldest subway tunnel and a museum built into the hallway of a Williamsburg apartment building. It’s an indispensable resource for visitors and residents alike. 


Cover of Travel Brightly edited by Sarika Bansal
Sarika Bansal
Tread Brightly: Notes on Ethical Travel 

Edited by Sarika Bansal ’12SIPA (2021)

Editor Sarika Bansal is a true citizen of the world: she has lived on five continents, speaks four languages, and has traveled extensively. So she’s more than qualified to ask tough questions and offer wisdom about how to travel ethically. The essays and photos in her collection tackle topics like the ecological implications of cruise ships, the ways that study-abroad programs and “orphanage tourism” impact communities, and the role that privilege plays in exploration. It’s a timely wake-up call, with plenty of thoughtful ideas for the future. 


Cover of The Diver's Clothes lie Empty by Vendela Vida
Ecco
The Diver’s Clothes Lie Empty 

By Vendela Vida ’96SOA (2015)

One of the most alluring elements of travel is self-reinvention, an idea central to Vendela Vida’s captivating, mind-bending thriller. Upon arriving at her hotel in Casablanca, Vida’s heroine is robbed of her passport and all her belongings. Strangely liberated by the crime that stripped her of her identity, she starts posing as a famous film star, which takes her on a series of mysterious adventures. Vida’s writing is full of fun twists, and any armchair traveler will delight in her portrait of the sunbaked Moroccan city. 


Italy for the Gourmet Traveler by Fred Plotkin
Kyle Books
Italy for the Gourmet Traveler 

By Fred Plotkin ’80JRN (2014)

There are plenty of good reasons to travel to Italy, but for most people the food is high on the list. And Fred Plotkin — an expert on Italian opera and cuisine — is the consummate guide. He has tips on the best restaurants, gelato stands, markets, wineries, and olive-oil distilleries, from the bustling centers of Rome and Milan to tiny villages off most tourist-trodden paths. Plotkin is working with travel-guide guru Rick Steves on a new gastronomic guide to Italy, out in 2023. Until then, this fifth edition remains an excellent resource. 


Cover of Wanderlust by Elisabeth Eaves
Seal Press
Wanderlust: A Love Affair with Five Continents 

By Elisabeth Eaves ’99SIPA (2011)

Elisabeth Eaves lives by the notion that you can “go off into the world and let it carry you along.” Her memoir chronicles fifteen years of truly globe-spanning travel — from the busy streets of Cairo to the jungles of Papua New Guinea. Almost every new place comes with a romance, but Eaves is clearly reluctant to settle down with any of the men she meets. It’s a journey that will speak to anyone who craves the unknown and fears the mundane. 
 

New Books: ‘The Mind Of A Bee’ – Lars Chittka (2022)

Most of us are aware of the hive mind—the power of bees as an amazing collective. But do we know how uniquely intelligent bees are as individuals? In The Mind of a Bee, Lars Chittka draws from decades of research, including his own pioneering work, to argue that bees have remarkable cognitive abilities.

He shows that they are profoundly smart, have distinct personalities, can recognize flowers and human faces, exhibit basic emotions, count, use simple tools, solve problems, and learn by observing others. They may even possess consciousness. Taking readers deep into the sensory world of bees, Chittka illustrates how bee brains are unparalleled in the animal kingdom in terms of how much sophisticated material is packed into their tiny nervous systems.

He looks at their innate behaviors and the ways their evolution as foragers may have contributed to their keen spatial memory. Chittka also examines the psychological differences between bees and the ethical dilemmas that arise in conservation and laboratory settings because bees feel and think. Throughout, he touches on the fascinating history behind the study of bee behavior. Exploring an insect whose sensory experiences rival those of humans, The Mind of a Bee reveals the singular abilities of some of the world’s most incredible creatures.

U.S. Lifestyle Rankings: The Best Places To Live In 2022

The 10 Best Places to Live in the U.S. in 2022-2023:

1. Huntsville, Alabama
2. Colorado Springs, Colorado
3. Green Bay, Wisconsin
4. Boulder, Colorado
5. San Jose, California
6. Raleigh and Durham, North Carolina
7. Fayetteville, Arkansas
8. Portland, Maine
9. Sarasota, Florida
10. San Francisco

Housing costs are rising fast and there aren’t enough homes on the market nationwide to meet demand, and anyone looking to move is acutely aware of the competition and high cost to buy or rent a home. The Best Places to Live rankings factor in how the cost of living compares to the area’s median household income, but U.S. News & World Report also broke out the data into its own ranking.

History Books: ‘The Castle’ By John Goodall (2022)

John Goodall’s The Castle: A history is the much slimmer companion to his magisterial The English Castle, (2011). Partly an attempt to bring the fruits of his research to a wider audience, Goodall’s new book uses extracts and quotations as the foundation of a historical account: each short chapter features an excerpt from a primary source that seeks to illustrate a particular moment. Rather than offering an architectural or conventional narrative history, Goodall explores the concept of the castle as it has been imagined, remade and contested over time. Important castles such as the Tower of London, Kenilworth and Windsor feature throughout.

Reviews: Top Convertible Sports Cars For 2022

The 2022 season of envy and bitterness is upon us, because the unaffordable convertible sports cars are finally hitting the streets. Today we will focus our window-shopping efforts on the all-new and facelifted models that once again will be setting even higher design and performance standards within the class.