Tag Archives: Architectural Digest

Top Architecture Books: “Atlas of Mid-Century Modern Houses” By Dominic Bradbury (2019)

From an Architectural Digest online review:

Atlas of Mid-Century Modern Houses 2019“If one imagines a list of the greatest, most influential houses of the twentieth century, it seems highly likely that the mid-century period will dominate,” writes Bradbury in the book’s introduction, going on to name such famous edifices as the three famous glass houses by Philip Johnson, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, and Lino Bo Bardi, respectively; Richard Neutra’s Kaufmann House; and Luis Barragán’s Cuadra San Cristóbal. “One could, of course, go on.…” he writes.

In the design world, is there any style that’s having more of a Renaissance moment than midcentury modern? It’s everywhere, from luxury hotels to high-end residential interiors to mainstream furniture lines from the likes of CB2 and Anthropologie, and it’s showing little sign of slowing down. In the midst of this revival, writer Dominic Bradbury, who has contributed to Architectural Digest, has compiled what might just be one of the most comprehensive books ever to be published on the subject.

To read more: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/atlas-of-mid-century-modern-houses

 

New Culture Books: “The Sartorialist INDIA” By Scott Schuman (2019)

From an Architectural Digest online interview:

the_sartorialist_india_fo_int_3d_05353_1908190959_id_1260398I wanted this book to be a bit different. It’s not an encyclopaedia of India, but I really tried to go to a lot of different places and photograph whatever I saw that I thought seemed really visually intriguing. I went to music festivals, sporting events, wrestling…and there’s cricket and horse racing in this book too.  There’s fashion week, and then small villages in Odisha. As a photographer, if you’re picky like I am, I didn’t want to just include say, a horse racing photograph, but I wanted to put myself in that position, and if I came up with something good, that would be great. I just wanted to try and put myself in a lot of different positions to see different elements of India.

Scott Schuman has been travelling to India for the better part of a decade. For his acclaimed fashion blog, The Sartorialist, Scott has photographed the eye-catching, sometimes strange, effortless whimsy of street fashion all around the world, and India has made a significant appearance too. Now, Scott is releasing a book of photographs specifically dedicated to the country—The Sartorialist: India, published by Taschen. Scott speaks to AD India about his travels to the country, his quest for the cool kids, and what still surprises him about Indian fashion.

To read more: https://www.architecturaldigest.in/content/the-sartorialist-in-conversation/#s-cust0

Destination Travel: “Belle Époque Luxury” At Domaine Les Crayères Hotel, Champagne, France

From an Architectural Digest online article:

Domaine Les Crayères Hotel in Champagne, FranceChampagne is a lot bigger than it seems. Vineyards can be up to an hour away from each other depending on traffic, so it’s best to pick a home base in the heart of the region. The luxurious Domaine  Les Crayères was the former home of Madame Pommery’s daughter (Pommery was a 19th century French businesswoman who took over her husband’s successful wine business after he passed away). The space was transformed into a hotel in the early 1980s, where it still retains some of the Belle Époque sensibility from its previous owner.

Champagne FranceChampagne is one of those places in the world that there’s truly no bad season to visit. Yet, before you let the bubbles get to your head, remember to plan everything in-advance as many vineyards are small, independently owned, and can’t always accommodate walk-ins. The place is also very spread out, so you should consider renting a car or hiring a driver if you’re booking several tastings. Luckily, getting to Champagne is easy, as it’s only a two-hour train ride from Paris. In fact, some travelers even opt to simply make a day trip out of it. Time spent aside, the grandiose French architecture all the way to the glow of the vineyards will warm your heart (no, it’s not just the alcohol) and have you immediately wanting to come back.

To read more: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/design-lovers-guide-to-champagne-france

Travel Destinations: Isla Palenque Is An Island Eco-Paradise Off Panama

From an Architectural Digest online review:

Isla Palenque Resort Panama PoolAs a natural paradise rooted in sustainable luxury, only 5 percent of the island is developed, with the rest kept as a nature reserve. “It’s 400 acres of unspoiled jungle, lagoons, mangroves, and beaches that create intimate connections between the land and the traveler,” notes Benjamin Loomis, the architect and developer behind Isla Palenque Resort. From the people to the food to the design materials, everything is sourced locally (most even coming directly from the property).

Let’s strip it back to the basics. Imagine your own private island: 400-acres of lush rain forest with a rich archaeological history and secluded beaches accessible by foot from a beachfront casita. At Isla Palenque, a small private island on the western Pacific shore of Panama, this is exactly what guests are treated to: a sustainable and intimate escape that is the ultimate expression of barefoot luxury. A plane, an automobile, and a boat ride are the minimum requirements to get there, but once you arrive, allow the tide to kiss your feet while you sip a fresh fruit juice at sunset on a beach you have completely to yourself.

To read more: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/this-private-island-oasis-in-panama-raises-the-bar-on-sustainable-design-retreats

Architectural Day Trips: The Glass House Designed By Philip Johnson In New Canaan, CT (1949)

From an Architectural Digest article:

The Glass House PresentationsThe Glass House, designed by architect Philip Johnson in 1949, when floor-to-ceiling windows were a novelty even in office buildings, is a work of art in itself. But there’s much more art to be found on the lush grounds of this famous home in New Canaan, Connecticut. Amble on over to the Painting Gallery, which houses large-scale works by Frank Stella, Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, and Cindy Sherman, among others, or the Sculpture Gallery, featuring works by such artists as Michael Heizer, George Segal, Frank Stella, and Bruce Nauman. 

 

http://theglasshouse.org/

Gastronomic Events: The Eiffel Tower’s “Le Jules Verne” Restaurant Reopens With Spectacular Makeover And Menu

From an Architectural Digest online article:

Le Jules Verne Eiffel Tower Restaurant Menu 2019Eating well on the Dame de Fer, a.k.a. the Iron Lady or Eiffel Tower, is tradition. When it first opened in 1889, there were already four restaurants on the first floor, tucked away in wooden pavilions. And to celebrate the landmark’s 130th birthday this year, three-Michelin-starred chef Frédéric Anton (of Le Pré Catelan in the Bois de Boulogne) will take the helm of the City of Light’s highest gastronomic destination, soaring 410 feet above the city.

Located on the second floor, with direct access via a private elevator on the south pillar, the Jules Verne Restaurant—named for the celebrated French novelist, poet, and playwright—is reopening on July 20, entirely refurbished by architect and interior designer Aline Asmar d’Amman, founder of Culture in Architecture. With some six million visitors every year, around 80 percent of whom are foreigners, Chef Anton wants his cuisine to mirror France’s “culinary excellence,” he says. Revisiting the great classics with seasonal and local products, Anton intends to create a gastronomic experience in the arts décoratifs tradition, for breakfast, lunch, and dinner.

To read more click on following link: https://www.architecturaldigest.com/story/eiffel-tower-jules-verne-restaurant-redesign