Category Archives: Poetry

Shakespeare & Company: Poets Richard Barnett & Luke Kennard (Podcast)

Poetic Views: Museum at Wordsworth Grasmere

The Museum at Wordsworth Grasmere, the second phase of work at the former Lake District home of the great English Romantic poet William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy, has opened to the public, with all gallery, exhibition design and interpretative overviews by Nissen Richards Studio.

The first phase of work by Nissen Richards Studio encompassed the conservation and reinterpretation of Dove Cottage itself, where William and Dorothy once lived, plus the new identity for Wordsworth Grasmere and the scheme’s signage and wayfinding.

The new visitor journey, designed by Nissen Richards Studio in close collaboration with the Wordsworth Grasmere team, includes a series of threshold moments, such as a totem sign and the setting of words into the walkways, featuring fragments of poems going off in two directions, so that visitors see them clearly on arrival and departure.

The Museum includes a shop and ticketing area, before visitors enter a new, double-height orientation space, where quotations by Wordsworth are set within a dramatic, full-height light wall. Visitors then make their way to a former stable space that houses an immersive introductory film, before stepping over the threshold into Dove Cottage. Visitors return to The Museum via Dove Cottage’s Garden-Orchard, entering an expanded first floor space, loosely arranged into four new galleries. Galleries One and Four are set to one side and Galleries Two and Three to the other, whilst a pause space in between offers views onto the gardens and surrounding landscape.

Poetry Readings: “I Am!” – By John Clare (1793 – 1864)

Read by John Davies

John Clare was an English poet who lived most of his life in abject poverty. His life was marred by bouts of mania and depression, and for the final 23 years of his life, Clare was locked in an insane asylum. It was here he began to write poetry; ‘I Am’ was Clare’s final elegy before his passing.

I Am!

BY JOHN CLARE

I am—yet what I am none cares or knows;
My friends forsake me like a memory lost:
I am the self-consumer of my woes—
They rise and vanish in oblivious host,
Like shadows in love’s frenzied stifled throes
And yet I am, and live—like vapours tossed

Into the nothingness of scorn and noise,
Into the living sea of waking dreams,
Where there is neither sense of life or joys,
But the vast shipwreck of my life’s esteems;
Even the dearest that I loved the best
Are strange—nay, rather, stranger than the rest.

I long for scenes where man hath never trod
A place where woman never smiled or wept
There to abide with my Creator, God,
And sleep as I in childhood sweetly slept,
Untroubling and untroubled where I lie
The grass below—above the vaulted sky.

Poetic Short Films: “Home” – The Himalayas Of Ladakh

Going the distance is not about how far away will you get, But from what length you are willing to return.

Seldom, we get to do projects crafted with so much perseverance, honesty, and love. Shooting at one of the most humble places in the world – Ladakh and exploring a side we hadn’t seen before, be it the raw beauty of the place or the wholehearted emotions of its people – it was a process that got us close to the feeling of being a Himalayan. Their way of life made us think if we are missing a point when we say we need to go the distance in life. Maybe at times going the distance could mean going back, to your roots. This introspection is what fuelled our latest project ‘Home’ for the Royal Enfield Himalayan.

We would like to thank some really talented minds who got associated with the project because they felt what we felt. It was an ever-evolving collaboration where each crew member brought something special to the film. A project that started with a casual conversation about doing something meaningful to shaping a strong idea and concept, to multiple jamming sessions with some of the best writers in the industry, to finally shooting in the extreme winter conditions of Ladakh (-17°C at 17,000 Feet to be precise), to endless hours on the edit, grade, and music. Yes, it’s been a long journey and a beautiful one.


We feel proud & blessed to be a part of this project and to having some of the most beautiful people in our team without whom this film wouldn’t be what it is. Grateful to each one of you for making this piece your own.
We’re excited to share our latest film with you all. Hope this finds a place in your heart as well.

Concept & Directed By : Aiman Ali
Starring : Chum Darang
Executive Producers : Nupur Guha & Tushar Raut
Senior Producer : Mrudangi Jasani Baidya
Producer : Suraj Shetty

Poems: Robert Frost’s “The Road Not Taken” As Drawn By Sergio Garcia Sanchez

Sergio García Sánchez is a cartoonist, illustrator and professor at the University of Granada, as well as co-author of the graphic novel “Lost in NYC: A Subway Adventure.”

Visualizing Robert Frost’s Seminal Poem
The illustrator Sergio Garcia Sanchez embarks on the road not taken.

Read more

Global News: A Worker’s World, Amazon Effect On Sports, Japanese Poetry

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, riding high in a workers’ worldthe Amazon effect on live sport (9:45) and even transience is mutating (17:35).

Poetic Travel: ‘Sussex By-The-Sea’, England (Video)

“Sussex by-the-Sea” is a 4K drone film is based on the words of the famous author and Sussex resident Rudyard Kipling’s 1902 poem “Sussex” and explores the East Sussex coastline between Roedean and Beachy Head.

Kipling, author of the “Jungle Book,” first lived in the village of Rottingdean and in 1902 bought 17th-century house “Batemans” in Burwash, East Sussex, where he lived until he died. His poem explored his love of the area, such as the wonders of the coastline and specific landmarks including the Longman of Wilmington and Beachy Head. Locations seen in the film include Roedean, Ovingdean, Rottingdean, Saltdean, Telscombe Cliffs, Peacehaven, Newhaven, Piddinghoe, Tide Mills, Seaford, Seven Sisters and Beachy Head, as well as landmarks such as the Meridian Monument, Litlington White Horse, The Long Man of Wilmington as well as the Newhaven Ferry.

“Sussex” (1902) Poem written by Rudyard Kipling
Narrated by Howard Ellison (howardellison.net/)
Filmed and edited by Dan Parkes (danthecameraman.co.uk/)
Music track: “Carried by the Wind” (licensed)
Music composed by Florian Seraul (tiny-music.com/)

Poetry: ‘When I Have Fears’ – John Keats (1795-1821)

Read by James Smillie – John Keats was a revered English poet who devoted his short life to the perfection of poetry.

John Keats was an English Romantic poet. He was one of the main figures of the second generation of Romantic poets, along with Lord Byron and Percy Bysshe Shelley, despite his works having been in publication for only four years before his death from tuberculosis at the age of 25. 

Greatest Poetry: ‘Ithaka’ By C.P. Cavafy (1863-1933)

Constantine Peter Cavafy was an Egyptiot Greek poet, journalist and civil servant. His consciously individual style earned him a place among the most important figures not only in Greek poetry, but in Western poetry as well. Cavafy wrote 155 poems, while dozens more remained incomplete or in sketch form. 

Ithaka

BY C. P. CAVAFYTRANSLATED BY EDMUND KEELEY

As you set out for Ithaka
hope your road is a long one,
full of adventure, full of discovery.
Laistrygonians, Cyclops,
angry Poseidon—don’t be afraid of them:
you’ll never find things like that on your way
as long as you keep your thoughts raised high,
as long as a rare excitement
stirs your spirit and your body.
Laistrygonians, Cyclops,
wild Poseidon—you won’t encounter them
unless you bring them along inside your soul,
unless your soul sets them up in front of you.

Hope your road is a long one.
May there be many summer mornings when,
with what pleasure, what joy,
you enter harbors you’re seeing for the first time;
may you stop at Phoenician trading stations
to buy fine things,
mother of pearl and coral, amber and ebony,
sensual perfume of every kind—
as many sensual perfumes as you can;
and may you visit many Egyptian cities
to learn and go on learning from their scholars.

Keep Ithaka always in your mind.
Arriving there is what you’re destined for.
But don’t hurry the journey at all.
Better if it lasts for years,
so you’re old by the time you reach the island,
wealthy with all you’ve gained on the way,
not expecting Ithaka to make you rich.

Ithaka gave you the marvelous journey.
Without her you wouldn’t have set out.
She has nothing left to give you now.

And if you find her poor, Ithaka won’t have fooled you.
Wise as you will have become, so full of experience,
you’ll have understood by then what these Ithakas mean.