Category Archives: Profiles

Culinary Arts Video: ‘Pierre Marcolini – The World’s Best Pastry Chef’

Belgian chocolatier Pierre Marcolini has been crowned the world’s best pastry chef by a jury of independent reporters, enhancing Belgium’s reputation as a producer of top class chocolate.

Artist Profiles: 84-Year Old American Minimalist Frank Stella (Video)

In this episode of Expert Voices, Lisa Dennison discusses a masterful painting created by Frank Stella in the early part of his career. In the 1950s, Stella left Princeton and moved to New York at the height of Abstract Expressionism. Despite being a progenitor of Minimalism, Stella’s gestural hand is visible in the concentric squares – most likely influenced by the Abstract Expressionists.

Frank Philip Stella is an American painter, sculptor and printmaker, noted for his work in the areas of minimalism and post-painterly abstraction. Stella lives and works in New York City. 

Artwork: Mark Rothko’s ‘Black On Maroon, 1958’ – An “Optical Experience”

In this episode of expert voices, David Galperin examines the painting that entirely shifted the remaining decade of Mark Rothko’s career. In 1958, Rothko’s transforms his color palette into the somber, meditative colors intended to provoke a submersive, awe-inspiring event upon viewing. Learn how in Untitled (Black on Maroon), Rothko embarks on this endeavor for the very first time. Untitled (Black on Maroon) is a highlight of the Contemporary Art Evening auction (28 October 2020, New York).

Top Short Films: “North Country”, Story Of 100-Year Old Lahout’s Ski Shop

Director: Nick Martini
DP: Cam Riley
Producer/Executive Producer: Anthony R. Lahout
Editor: Mattias Evangelista
Sound: Alex Boll

Since 1920, America’s Oldest Ski Shop

100-year businesses don’t exist. The retail industry is dead. In the rugged White Mountains of northern New Hampshire, Lahout’s has remained open 365 days a year since 1920. While e-commerce and conglomerates have stripped the country of local, independent retailers, a family of Lebanese immigrants have prevailed for a century, beating the Great Depression, World War II, the Dot Com Crash and Great Recession.

Award-winning director Nick Martini and cinematographer Cam Riley have teamed up with executive producer Anthony Lahout to captivate a nation consumed with hashtags instead of history. This film tells a timeless short story of the American dream and the family that put a community on skis. After 100 years, Lahout’s is still a family business moving onto its fourth generation. Through past and present, we learn the true root of the store’s success. As the original passes on, we question and discover the backbone of its longevity. We hope to inspire immigrants, millennials, family businesses, and outdoor enthusiasts that all in America is not lost.

Learn more about Lahout’s – America’s Oldest Ski Shop:
www. lahouts.com
instagram.com/lahouts
facebook.com/lahouts

Top Artist Profile: British Watercolorist Tim Wilmot

Tim Wilmot is an artist from Bristol in the South-west of the UK, specialising in vibrant watercolours, using tone and light to bring out the best in the medium. Tim, self-taught, paints in a loose, impressionistic style and, while having dabbled with portraits and still lifes, he is inexorably drawn to landscapes.

Watercolorist Tim Wilmot

He says: “I’m an outdoor person rather than an indoor person. For many years I’ve taken a sketch book on my travels and I quickly scribble scenes in a shorthand sort of way. Then, returning home, I recreate those memories with paint and brush. Watercolour is also an ideal medium for those quick impressions when you’re limited in time.”

Website

Artists: French Romantic Painter Eugène Delacroix – ‘Greece On The Ruins Of Missolonghi, 1826’ (Video)

Eugène Delacroix, Greece on the Ruins of Missolonghi, 1826, oil on canvas, 208 cm × 147 cm (Musée des Beaux-Arts de Bordeaux). Speakers: Dr. Steven Zucker and Dr. Beth Harris.

Ferdinand Victor Eugène Delacroix was a French Romantic artist regarded from the outset of his career as the leader of the French Romantic school. 

Artist Profile Video: Scottish Painter Peter Doig – ‘Boiler House’ (1994)

In 1991, the Scottish artist Peter Doig (b. 1959) visited Le Corbusier’s Unité d’Habitation in northeast France, a utopian housing project that had opened in 1961 in Briey-en-Fôret, then been abandoned.

To Doig, the project was a temple of hope laid to ruin, and the nine large-scale canvases it inspired — Doig’s seminal ‘Concrete Cabins’ series, the largest and most distinctive cycle in Doig’s oeuvre — became a meditation on the decay of Le Corbusier’s modernist vision of social cohesion.

Boiler House was first exhibited in Salzburg after Doig had won the Eliette von Karajan prize in 1994, and was included in Doig’s 2008 retrospective at Tate Britain. It stands alone within the cycle, an isolated building in the forest.

Depicting the building designed to house the estate’s coal boiler, it is rendered in fluid trails of impasto, and carries a stark anthropomorphic charge, the angular geometries looming large through a screen of trees, shifting in and out of focus like a memory or fragments from a movie reel.

Learn More: https://www.christies.com/features/Bo…

Photography: Brazilian Vik Muniz – ‘Postcards From Nowhere’ (2020)

Vik Muniz’s series Postcards from Nowhere grapples with how, through photographs, we have come to “see” and understand distant yet iconic sites we may never actually view with our own eyes. “The images we hold in our heads are an assemblage,” notes Muniz. “They are an amalgam of every image of those locations that we have ever seen.” 

Not so long ago, it was relatively easy to wake up overlooking Victoria Harbour in Hong Kong and go to sleep in the shadow of the Brooklyn Bridge; to travel from Venice to Istanbul in time for dinner. The international network of the art world, in particular, made it easy to slip through time and borders—with the right invitation and the right passport. You may never have been to Basel, Switzerland for the art fairs, but you might certainly feel as though you have, experiencing it exclusively through the spate of other people’s images.

Website

Art History Video: ‘French Surrealist Painter Francis Picabia’ – “Minos” (1929)

Master Surrealist Francis Picabia created complex-dream like paintings for his series, “Transparencies”. In this episode of Anatomy of an Artwork, discover the hidden inspirations for his painting, Minos, and learn about the meaning behind each transparent layer.

Francis Picabia (1879 – 1953) was a French avant-garde painter, poet and typographist. After experimenting with Impressionism and Pointillism, Picabia became associated with Cubism. His highly abstract planar compositions were colourful and rich in contrasts.

Podcast Profiles: ‘Amelia Earhart’ (1897 – 1937)

In this new series we profile some of the fearless record-breaking aviators who flew to dizzying heights and were pioneers in their field. We begin with the first woman to fly solo across the Atlantic, Amelia Earhart, who paved the way for women in aviation.