Category Archives: Homes

Remodels: 1892 Victorian Home In Goshen, New York

Today on AD we visit Goshen in Upstate New York to tour a Victorian home from 1892 with a ton of potential, but needing lots of work. Contractor Nick Schiffer from NS Builders goes room by room laying out the possibilities within the walls while acknowledging how daunting the road to this former gem’s restoration will be. When you see it’s listed at just under $300,000, though – and similar sized homes in the area fetch double that amount – this massive renovation becomes one seriously worth considering.

Tours: Lake Maggiore Villa In Piedmont, Italy

Overlooking Piedmont’s shores of Lake Maggiore, just a few kilometres from Stresa and the border with Switzerland, this elegant period estate for sale has a private dockyard and direct access to the lake. The possibility of arriving by boat and landing with your own helicopter make this property even more exclusive, ideal for all those who wish to experience being by the lake in an exciting context.

This splendid property consists of a prestigious period villa, whose origins date back to 1820: with a past full of changes behind it, it has managed to preserve its enormous historical prestige thanks to an intense and precious renovation that ‘has seen it reborn as a private home, which also supports a successful hospitality business as a luxury hotel. Next to it, in an exclusive position facing the lake, an original building from the early twentieth century is the result of a meticulous recovery and restoration of what was once a hydroelectric power station. Today, with an internal area of 220 square meters on two levels, it lends itself as a charming annex serving the main estate, with independent and direct access to the garden that surrounds the entire property.

Architecture: ‘The Stahl House – Inside LA’s Most Iconic Modernist Home’

“Buck wanted to stand in every room from his house, turn his head, and see every view. Even the bathroom. And so that was kind of what inspired the design of the house.”

LA's Iconic Stahl House (Case Study House #22) | Rue Margaux

Among the most famous photographs of modern architecture is Julius Shulman’s picture of Case Study House #22, also known as the Stahl House after the family that commissioned it. Two girls in white dresses sit inside a glass cube that seems to float atop a cliff over the illuminated grid of Los Angeles at night. Built by a family with a “beer budget and champagne tastes,” the two-bedroom home designed by architect Pierre Koenig changed residential design in LA. While Shulman’s image and others of the building have appeared in countless publications, advertisements, films, and TV shows, the story of how the house came to be and what it was like to live there is less well known.

In this episode, Bruce Stahl and Shari Stahl Gronwald and writer Kim Cross discuss the story of how Case Study House #22 came to be and share personal stories about what it was like to grow up and live in the home, from roller skating across the concrete floors to diving off the roof into the pool. Stahl, Gronwald, and Cross are co-authors of the recent book The Stahl House: Case Study House #22; The Making of a Modernist Icon.

To buy the book The Stahl House: Case Study House #22; The Making of a Modernist Icon.

Architecture & Design: ‘Courtyard House’ In Hawthorn, Australia

Courtyard House by Ha Architecture is a Japanese inspired home, presented as a merging of heritage and contemporary design. The home’s streetscape heritage overlay allowed the existing home façade to be maintained; it was restored and repaired to its original condition, including the original windows. Internally, a meeting of contemporary and traditional principles imbues the space with a tranquil charm – a quiet space of reflection and rest. Inside the Japanese inspired home, Courtyard House is centred around its internal courtyard.

The brief required an adaption of contemporary Japanese architecture and lifestyle ideologies, with a focus on outdoor spaces and passive design principles. The entryway is intimate, instilled with ambient light and an immediate saturation of timber. This sensory experience allows Courtyard House to emerge as a Japanese inspired home, propelled by an inherent sustainability that underpins the very fabric of the project. Windows frame backdrops of bamboo and showcase selected stone features, creating a constant discourse between the internal and external spaces. The landscape orientation, as well as vantage points, play a considered role in the architecture.

Mid Century Modern: 1956 Desert Sun House, Rancho Mirage, California (Video)

Architect Richard Leitch from the USC School of Architecture isn’t spoken about too often however his work speaks volume. From The Hillsides of Altadena to the dry landscapes of the desert you can find some of Richard’s work throughout Southern California. Avid Car lover Joe Tseng found himself entrenched in a year-long restoration/Remodel of his current home ‘ The Desert Sun House’, a project which he wanted to share with his son Tyler. They’ve saved and transformed the home into what you see today, A classic home filled with rich History and thoroughly enjoyed by its new owners.

Penthouse Design Tour: 79th Floor In New York City By Hiroshi Sugimoto

Inside a $135,000,000 NYC Penthouse Apartment! Here is it a look touring one of the most expensive apartments not only in New York City but in the World – The 79th floor unit of the iconic 432 Park Ave building in New York City. This full floor unit is designed in a traditional Japanese style by world-renowned artist and architect Hiroshi Sugimoto! As a New Yorker its a real treat to share a look inside this iconic building. Let me know what kind of NYC Apartment tours or mansion tours you want to see in future episodes.

In This Manhattan Apartment, Every Room Is a Testament to Japanese  Tradition - The New York Times

Views: Cragside Mansion In Northumberland, UK

The first house in the world to be lit by hydroelectricity and full of Victorian gadgets and innovations, Cragside in Northumberland has always been at the forefront of modern living.

But now, climate change has started to catch up with this pioneering place. More frequent and intense rainfall is overwhelming the house’s drainage system and beginning to find its way inside of the Arts and Crafts mansion. Most affected is the drawing room with its immense, two-story high, ornately carved marble fireplace.

Rainwater is pushing salts that are in the stonework of the house through to the decorative marble and plasterwork of fireplace inside, causing its surface to deteriorate, meaning urgent work is needed to save this irreplaceable piece of architecture from crumbling away.

A two-stage project is currently underway to stabilise and future-proof the fireplace against climate-change, conserving it for future generations. As conservation work continues, Cragside is once again looking to the future – this time by looking to its past. Originally built by architect Lord Armstrong and his wife Lady Margaret, this pair of innovators created Britain’s original smart home when Cragside became the first house in the world to be illuminated by hydroelectricity, generated by its man-made lakes.

A project in 2014 gave the estate the ability to yield enough energy from water to light the whole house by installing an Archimedes Screw, which works at an angle and allows water to pass between the Tumbleton Lake and the burn below. This converts the power of the water flowing through it into electricity, a never-ending source that now illuminates the whole house and sends excess power back to the National Grid. Watch this video to discover more.

Gardens & Estates: ‘Villa Margaret’ – Umbria, Italy


In the heart of Umbria, on the hills surrounding the Etruscan city of Perugia, this wonderful 650 sqm villa with 9 bedrooms and Renaissance tower is perfect for anyone looking for a luxury property to use as a private residence or as a base for a hosting business. The icing on this beautiful cake is the beautiful garden designed by the landscape architect Pietro Porcinai and made up of a park and a winter garden with swimming pool. The property is then completed by a tennis court.

Tours: ‘Captain Kelly’s Cottage’ On Bruny Island in Southern Tasmania

Captain Kelly’s Cottage is the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world. The house was finished in 2016 by John Wardle Architects for John and his wife Susan.

Having bought Waterview without knowing its history, John and Susan quickly researched the landscape and its colonial settlement. After asking neighbours and previous owners, John found out that Captain Kelly was a first-generation European Australian with convict parents. Before John and Susan intervened, the cottage had weathered multiple additions and alterations and, along the way, lost a sense of its own history.

As one of two large structures perched along the edge of the vast maritime landscape, looking out over the ocean of Storm Bay, Captain Kelly’s Cottage is steeped in architectural history. Throughout the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world, John Wardle Architects achieved a contemporary reading of the existing structure whilst featuring important elements of its past.

For a small and condensed project, John found the restoration challenging – to give the interior design and the architecture a present-day reinterpretation, whilst staying true to its heritage and understanding the environmental impacts and climatic conditions of being on the edge of a cliff. John also took the time to understand the responsibility of owning the Tasmanian land.

More recently, research into the pre-colonial history of the First Nation’s stewardship of the property is being undertaken, an important task John is intent on doing. As the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world comes to a close, John views his interventions as a curatorial restoration. The home is primarily made from timber and brick, which has been locally sourced.

Additionally, a lot of the interior design is fuelled by locally sourced elements – materials, furniture and pieces. Fabrics and objects within the interior have also been sourced by John and Susan from their international travels, evoking the essence of a maritime home on the edge of a cliff, looking out to the world beyond. Stated to have been built by carpenters from Kelly’s ship, the architecture and interior design of the home today speaks to its original identity and tells the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world.

Internally, a strip of paint has been removed to reveal the home’s original paint colours, exploring both the original and subsequent eras of the cottage’s existence at once. Located on Bruny Island in Southern Tasmania, Captain Kelly’s Cottage by John Wardle Architects is a significant intersection of historical eras. The cottage is the story of restoring a historical home on the edge of the world; there is an appreciation felt throughout – of its past and a celebration for its future.