Category Archives: Magazines

Previews: New York Times Magazine- January 29, 2023

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The New York Times Magazine – January 29, 2023 issue:

Student. Athlete. Mogul?

Now that college players are allowed to cut sponsorship deals, some of them are raking in the money — but at what cost to the rest?

Your Next Hospital Bed Might Be at Home

In a time of strained capacity, the “hospital at home” movement is figuring out how to create an inpatient level of care anywhere.

Can Germany Be a Great Military Power Again?

Leery of Russian aggression, Europe’s economic giant is making a historic attempt to revitalize its armed forces. It has a long way to go.

Research Preview: Science Magazine- January 27, 2023

Science Magazine (January 27, 2023) – The Amazon forest is changing rapidly as a result of human activities, including deforestation for agriculture, such as these soybean fields in Belterra, Pará, Brazil. Remaining areas of forest are experiencing an increased incidence of fires, drought, and the effects of neighboring land uses. These changes threaten local biodiversity and communities and alter the global climate.

Bird flu spread between mink is a ‘warning bell’

Big outbreak at a Spanish farm reignites fears of an H5N1 influenza pandemic

Can California’s floods help recharge depleted aquifers?

Plans to drown orchards and farm fields to boost groundwater supplies get off to a slow start

In Science Journals

Highlights from the Science family of journals

Previews: The Economist Magazine- January 28, 2023

The Economist Magazine- January 28, 2023 issue:

The humbling of Goldman Sachs

The struggle to reinvent a firm trapped by its own mythology

China is trying to win over Westerners and private firms

But Xi Jinping is unlikely to change

What makes Germany’s Leopard 2 tank the best fit for Ukraine?

It is easier to run than America’s Abrams—and in plentiful supply in Europe

Research Preview: Nature Magazine- January 26, 2023

Volume 613 Issue 7945

nature Magazine – January 26, 2023 issue:

The water crisis is worsening. Researchers must tackle it together

It’s unacceptable that millions living in poverty still lack access to safe water and basic sanitation. Nature Water will help researchers to find a way forward.

Dainty eater: black hole consumes a star bit by bit

Repeating bursts of X-rays lead scientists to a black hole that eats in spurts.

ChatGPT listed as author on research papers: many scientists disapprove

At least four articles credit the AI tool as a co-author, as publishers scramble to regulate its use.

Previews: The Guardian Weekly – January 27, 2023

Old world – Inside the 27 January Guardian Weekly | Population | The  Guardian

The Guardian Weekly – January 27, 2023 Issue:

It’s an age-old question: how should nations around the world adjust to their elderly societies? Japan has faced such realities for a while now, but the challenges are becoming increasingly common across the developed world where families are getting smaller, and people are living longer.

Even India – which will soon overtake China as the world’s most populous country – is now seeing an older demographic become more prevalent in some states. The countries of sub-Saharan Africa, meanwhile, look most likely to enjoy the benefits of a younger population as the century progresses. For the Guardian Weekly magazine’s big story this week, Emma Graham-Harrison and Justin McCurry assess what ageing populations hold in store for the world. And Verna Yu reports on the reasons why many young people in China seem reluctant to start families.

Books: TLS/Times Literary Supplement- Jan 27, 2023

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Times Literary Supplement (January 27, 2023) @TheTLS , featuring @TimParksauthor on Italo Calvino; @15thcgossipgirl on the Wife of Bath; @NshShulman on Prince Harry; Fredrik Logevall on Jefferson the writer; @lejhouston on queer poetry; @RSmythFreelance on Ronald Blythe – and more.

Books: London Review Of Books – February 2, 2023

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London Review of Books (LRB) – February 2, 2023:

‘Island nations tend to be complacent about border problems, seeing them as things that happen to someone else. But then you have Brexit and Northern Ireland, and it suddenly becomes clear that no one is safe.

Russia is fighting Ukraine about borders. This means that, as well as dodging bombs and getting used to living in the dark, residents of the border zone have to decide if they are “really” Russian or “really” Ukrainian.

Some will no doubt be keeping the non-chosen identity in a trunk in the attic, to be retrieved in case of future need. But the logic of war is stern: those who choose to be Ukrainians are also opting to hate Russians as the enemy invader, while those in Ukraine who choose to be Russians are contemplating the possibility of having to move east.

Wherever the border ultimately settles, there will be fortifications and troops stationed on either side and a series of tightly controlled crossing points. Villages and families will be divided and the normal commerce of economic and social life disrupted. Schools will teach in the language of the victor. Roads that used to lead somewhere will end abruptly.’


The Curtain and the Wall: A Modern Journey along Europe’s Cold War Border 
by Timothy Phillips

On the Edge: Life along the Russia-China Border by Franck Billé and Caroline Humphrey

Culture/Society: Monocle Magazine – February 2023

Issue 160 - Monocle - Print - Shop | Monocle

Monocle FilmsMonocle’s February 2023 issue is all about celebrating places that work, whether that’s a parliament, home or metro carriage. From a floating office to a school teaching children the rules of the road, we profile the locations that look good and work well for those who use them. Plus: Charleston’s hospitality boom and why you should learn Russian.

Previews: The New Yorker Magazine- January 30, 2023

Christoph Niemanns “Highway and Byways”

The New Yorker – January 30, 2023 Issue:

The Mayor and the Con Man

Bishop Lamor Whitehead and Eric Adams stand while speaking at a bar.

Eric Adams’s friends and allies have puzzled over his relationship with Lamor Whitehead, a fraudster Brooklyn church leader.

After Bolsonaro, Can Lula Remake Brazil?

Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, photographed by Tommaso Protti.

Following a prison term, a fraught election, and a near-coup, the third-time President takes charge of a fractured country.

What’s the Matter with Men?

A girl leap-frogging over a boy in a superhero costume.

They’re floundering at school and in the workplace. Some conservatives blame a crisis of masculinity, but the problems—and their solutions—are far more complex.