Tag Archives: New Zealand

Concrete Architecture: The Sandcastle In Point Chevalier, New Zealand

As an architectural house, The Sandcastle by Ponting Fitzgerald Architects champions the creative and structural benefits of concrete. Inspired by a sandcastle and built by Bannan Construction, the sculptural building is firmly established within its coastal context.

00:00 – An Introduction to the Architectural House 00:53 – Creating a Sandcastle 01:19 – Entering the House 02:06 – Building for the Coastal Climate 02:32 – A Unique Use of Concrete 03:37 – Materiality 04:07 – Lighting in the House 04:25 – Unique Qualities of the House 05:00 – What the Builder is Most Proud Of

Built within the inner harbour zone of Point Chevalier, The Sandcastle is situated directly above the shore. Sitting on a bluff of land that resembles a sand dune in constitution, the three-storey concrete home is conceived as an architectural house that naturally extends from the surrounding landscape. A house tour of The Sandcastle evidences its status as an architectural house, with the form of the building representing a playful yet sophisticated interpretation of a sandcastle. Concrete plays an important role in realising the shape of the home, offering endless formal possibilities in its pre-set, liquid state. Ponting Fitzgerald Architects crafts a dynamic materiality that withstands the erosive coastal climate. Although the concrete exterior interacts with the salt, wind and water of the environment – gracefully expressing the passage of time through a weather-beaten appearance – The Sandcastle maintains its structural integrity, establishing itself as an architectural house embedded in the landscape. With the help of Bannan Construction, Ponting Fitzgerald Architects creates an architectural house that is both rugged in nature and refined in form and concept. The Sandcastle stands as an enduring aspect of the coast; a solid piece of architecture, made in recognition of place.

Tours: Caspers House On Paku Hill, New Zealand

A house of contrast, Caspers House is an interior designer’s own home. Crafted by Dessein Parke in collaboration with Glamuzina Architects, the residence represents the playful exploration of space and colour. The relationship between the home and its unique location may be the first indication that Caspers House is an interior designer’s own home.

Timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to an Interior Designer’s Own Home 00:51 – Orientation of the Home 01:31 – Interior Designer’s Own Home 02:04 – Unique Wall Colour 02:25 – Utilisinig Natural Light 02:45 – Split Level Design 03:31 – Features of the Home 04:21 – The Interior Designer’s Favourite Part of the Home 04:39 – The Architect’s Favourite Part of the Home 04:55 – Success of the Project

Settled on Paku Hill, an old volcano at the edge of Tairua, Caspers House relates to its setting through its boldly designed architecture. Comprised of subtle, corrugated fiberglass and sporting a triangular structure, the unconventional façade of the home references the special nature of the landscape. As an interior designer’s own home, Caspers House expresses an adventurous design approach, distinguishing it from typical New Zealand dwellings and paying homage to its unusual volcano location.

In contrast to the stark white interiors of other homes, the design of Caspers House champions a dark, muted palette that calms the senses. Testifying to its status as an interior designer’s own home, Caspars House maximises the spatial opportunities afforded by its unique architecture. Open-plan elements are contrasted with split levels, establishing the spatial flow of the home and allowing for moments of privacy within communally inhabited spaces.

The ideal match for its volcano setting, Caspers House is imbued with a sense of character. Intelligently designed and thoroughly executed, the residence exemplifies an interior designer’s own home.

New Zealand Home Tour: Mahuika – Waiheke Island

Blending into the black of the bush, Mahuika is a private island house that embraces the external environment. Faced with a challenging site, Daniel Marshall Architects (DMA) uses the unique building context to infuse Mahuika with a sense of legend and soul, crafting a secluded home with a fiery past.

Video Timeline: 00:00 – An Introduction to the Private Island House 00:32 – Mahuika – Fire and Renewal 01:09 – Utilising Natural Light 01:35 – Remote and Private 01:55 – The Pool 02:24 – The Kitchen Appliances 03:12 – Bathrooms and Bedrooms 03:55 – Challenges of the Build 04:18 – The Materials 04:43 – What the Architect is Most Proud Of

A private island house, Mahuika is located on Waiheke Island in the Hauraki Gulf of New Zealand. After a shocking incident that saw the project burnt just weeks before it was initially due to be completed, DMA named the home after the Māori Goddess of Fire. The timber-framed structure is designed so that the living room occupies the architectural cantilever, shading the pool below whilst bedrooms spread across different levels of the home.

In both surrounding context and brief, Mahuika presented DMA with obstacles to overcome. The changeable nature of the Auckland climate meant that the interior design and architecture of the private island house had to complement flitting natural light and striking external scenes. In addition, the design of the house had to be conducive to minimal visits to the shops during the week.

DMA convincingly responds to the difficulties proposed by the project, finding beauty within innovative solutions. The practice embraces the environment as part of the reality of living in a private island house, applying floor-to-ceiling glazing to the architecture of Mahuika in promotion of an authentic lifestyle.

In the kitchen, a generous whole foods storage system meets the requirements of the home whilst the sleek surface of Fisher & Paykel appliances reflects the view of the bush and sea. In Mahuika, the Auckland climate has the ideal subject. DMA designs the private island house to gracefully accept the ever-changing natural elements and vistas, welcoming them as defining features and reflecting them back out as parts of itself.

Views: Gannets In Cape Kidnappers, New Zealand

We leave you this Sunday morning at Cape Kidnappers in New Zealand, with gannets, who mate for life. Videographer: Jaime McDonald.

Australasian gannets nest in dense breeding colonies on the New Zealand mainland and coastal rocks and islands, as well as off south-east Australia and Tasmania. Although gannets can be seen occasionally from most places along the coasts of the New Zealand main islands, most gannetries are situated off the North Island. The largest mainland gannetry is at Cape Kidnappers, with around 5,000 breeding pairs. Other mainland breeding sites include Muriwai and Farewell Spit.

Australasian gannets mostly feed on waters over the continental shelf. They prefer flat ground for nesting, rather than cliff ledges. Breeding colonies are mostly situated at sites that are completely or largely surrounded by the sea, i.e. on islands or headlands.

Cape Kidnappers, also known as Te Kauwae-a-Māui and officially known as Cape Kidnappers / Te Kauwae-a-Māui, is a headland at the southeastern extremity of Hawke’s Bay on the east coast of New Zealand’s North Island and sits at the end of an 8 kilometres peninsula which protrudes into the Pacific Ocean.

Mountains: Aoraki Mount Cook In New Zealand (4K)

Mount Cook National Park, or Aoraki, is a mountain in the New Zealand Southern Alps, the highest point in New Zealand, located in the western part of the South Island near the coast. This saddle-shaped, steep-sided, crystalline mountain is covered with snow and glaciers.

New Zealand Train Lines: North Island Main Trunk

Tours: ‘Skylark Cabin’ – Off Grid Tiny Home In Twizel, New Zealand

A tiny off grid cabin, Skylark Cabin embraces the incredible views afforded by its location. Barry Connor Design opens the cabin to the foothills of the Ben Ohau Mountain Range, establishing the residence as a dream home. Settled into the rugged environment of Twizel, Canterbury, the tiny off grid cabin is under 50 square metres and under four metres in height. From the cabin tour, i

Video timeline: 00:00 – The Local Project Print Publication 00:20 – The Brief for the Architect 00:45 – The Location of the Off Grid Cabin 01:03 – The Layout of the Cabin 02:40 – The Exterior from the Street 03:00 – The Layout Continued 03:26 – The Weather and Environment Around the Cabin 04:08 – Using Orange on the Exterior 04:20 – The Exterior of the Off Grid Cabin 04:51 – The Skylight in the Bedroom 05:04 – The Outdoor Bath 05:55

t becomes clear that the home has many features that make it a special addition to Airbnb. The architecture of Skylark Cabin encourages residents to enjoy the New Zealand landscape. Windows of various sizes throughout the home make for defined views of Backbone Peak and the Ben Ohau Range, whilst an open sightline from the bedroom to the reserve – passing through the living room – allows the tiny off grid cabin to borrow visual space from the outdoors. Barry Connor Design ensures that the interior design of the tiny off grid cabin references the natural scenery. Sheets of beech plywood pull the colours of the surrounding landscape into the cabin, whilst a large skylight above the bed alludes to the night sky in oversized, telescopic fashion. By creating a tiny off grid cabin that bears witness to its ever-changing external environment, Barry Connor ensures that the experience of backcountry Ben Ohau Range is like no other.

Home Tour: ‘Menzies Pop’ In Sumner, New Zealand

An architect’s own home, Menzies Pop is a celebration of architectural craft. Introducing a refined material palette to the pre-existing building, Common Architecture maximises the potential of the New Zealand property. Located in Sumner, a suburb settled on the outskirts of Christchurch, Menzies Pop is a distinctive concrete construction.

A house tour of ‘The Bunker’, as it is referred to by locals, reveals the creative possibilities of the building that culminated in it becoming an architect’s own home. Hand-crafted details give character to the foundation of the house, such as clover shapes cut into the parapets and a skilfully carved arched entrance. Features retained by Common Architecture, such as a concrete ceiling and concrete work beams, present the home as an architecturally exciting offering.

Cementing its status as an architect’s own home, Menzies Pop emerges as a thoughtful reconfiguration of its original building. Three bedrooms are reimagined as a kitchen-living area, with their north-west orientation allowing the spaces to have access to a deck at the rear of the home. By moving the kitchen into a more communal part of the house, Common Architecture presents the space as central to family life. The interior design of the structure speaks to the fact that it is an architect’s own home.

An expert eye is applied to the scale of furniture, skylights and the single-length boards that cover some of the walls of the home, so that the dimensions of the building are emphasised. The beloved timber of the pre-existing home is complemented by teak, stone and brass accents, which form a sophisticated extension of the original material palette. Embracing its structural history, Menzies Pop stands as a cleverly crafted example of an architect’s own home.

Timeline: 00:00 – The Local Project’s Print Publication 00:20 – An Introduction to Menzies Pop by Common Architecture 00:40 – Where It’s Located 00:52 – The Existing House 01:35 – The Beginning of the Renovations 02:45 – The Key Elements of the New Renovation 03:47 – The Kitchen 04:01 – The Extension (First Floor Edition) 05:03 – The Key Learnings 05:41 – What Common Architecture Are Most Proud Of 06:19 – The Local Project’s Tri-Annual Subscription

Morning News: UK Energy Transition, Interest Rates & Inflation, Lego’s Rise

A.M. Edition for Oct. 6. WSJ’s Rochelle Toplensky explains what went wrong in Britain’s energy transition and what other countries can learn from this. The Senate prepares another vote on raising the U.S. debt limit. 

New Zealand raises interest rates as more central banks worry about rising inflation. Hundreds more join the oil spill cleanup in California. Plus, how the world’s biggest toy maker, Lego, stayed popular during the pandemic. Peter Granitz hosts.