Politics: David Brooks And Ruth Marcus On The Latest In Washington (PBS)

New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post columnist Ruth Marcus join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week’s political news, including the Senate’s decision not to call witnesses in President Trump’s impeachment trial, Republicans’ varying defenses of Trump’s conduct around Ukraine and what recent polling trends among 2020 Democrats suggest about Monday’s Iowa caucuses.

Dementia: Antioxidant “Flavonols” From Fruits & Vegetables Lower Alzheimer’s Risk By 48%

From a Rush University Medical Center online article:

The study found that participants in the group with the highest flavonol consumption were 48% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s dementia later on in life than participants with the lowest level. Of the 186 people in the highest group, 28 people, or 15%, developed Alzheimer’s dementia, compared to 54 people, or 30%, of the 182 people in the lowest group.

flavonols infographic Neurology Journal January 29 2020

People who eat or drink more foods with flavonol, which is found in nearly all fruits and vegetables, plus tea and wine, may be less likely to develop Alzheimer’s dementia, according to the Rush researchers. They published the results of their study in the Jan. 29 online issue of Neurology.

Flavonols are a type of flavonoid, a group of phytochemicals found in plant pigments. They are known for their beneficial effects on health due to their antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties.

A total of 921 people with an average age of 81 participated in the Neurology study. These participants did not have Alzheimer’s dementia when starting the study.

Read more

Podcast Interviews: Dean Baquet, 63-Year Old NY Times Executive Editor

The Daily New York Times PodcastWith voting for 2020 set to begin in Iowa on Monday, “The Daily” sat down with Dean Baquet, the executive editor of The New York Times, to discuss the lessons he — and the organization — learned from 2016. For more information on today’s episode, visit nytimes.com/thedaily.

The media’s coverage of the 2016 presidential campaign has come to be criticized for operating under three key assumptions: that Hillary Clinton was certain to be the Democratic nominee, that Donald Trump was unlikely to be the Republican nominee, and that once Clinton and Trump had become their party’s nominees, she would win.

Dean P. Baquet is an American journalist. He has been the executive editor of The New York Times since May 14, 2014. Between 2011 and 2014 Baquet was managing editor under the previous executive editor Jill Abramson. He is the first black American to serve as executive editor. Wikipedia

Future Of Trucks: The “GMC Hummer EV” Will Be Revealed In May 2020

GMC Hummer LogoThe all-electric First Ever GMC HUMMER EV leads a quiet revolution – with zero emissions and zero limits. It earns its super truck status with up to:

  • 1000 HORSEPOWER

  • 11,500 LB.-FT OF TORQUE

  • 0-60 MPH IN 3 SECONDS

Website

Landscape Travel Videos: “Lanzarote – The Wonder” By L’oeil d’Eos (2020)

Raw. Mineral. Bewitchingly. These three words describe perfectly the atmosphere that we could feel on Lanzarote in the Canary archipelago off the coast of Morocco.

Lanzarote The Wonder Landscape Landscapre Travel Film by L'oeil d'Eos 2020
Far from the crowd that can be everywhere on Lanzarote (sometimes), we have found preserved and totally uninhabited places there. It’s this side that we wanted to explore. The soul of its landscapes, of this volcanic lands, between dark rock, stormy ocean and wonderful nature.

Website

Economics Lectures: “The Great Reversal” Author Thomas Phillippon On Corporate Power (Video)

In this much-anticipated book, a leading economist argues that many key problems of the American economy are due not to the flaws of capitalism or the The Great Reversal Thomas Phillipponinevitabilities of globalization but to the concentration of corporate power. By lobbying against competition, the biggest firms drive profits higher while depressing wages and limiting opportunities for investment, innovation, and growth.

Why are cell-phone plans so much more expensive in the United States than in Europe? It seems a simple question. But the search for an answer took Thomas Philippon on an unexpected journey through some of the most complex and hotly debated issues in modern economics. Ultimately he reached his surprising conclusion: American markets, once a model for the world, are giving up on healthy competition. Sector after economic sector is more concentrated than it was twenty years ago, dominated by fewer and bigger players who lobby politicians aggressively to protect and expand their profit margins. Across the country, this drives up prices while driving down investment, productivity, growth, and wages, resulting in more inequality. Meanwhile, Europe―long dismissed for competitive sclerosis and weak antitrust―is beating America at its own game.

Philippon, one of the world’s leading economists, did not expect these conclusions in the age of Silicon Valley start-ups and millennial millionaires. But the data from his cutting-edge research proved undeniable. In this compelling tale of economic detective work, we follow him as he works out the basic facts and consequences of industry concentration in the U.S. and Europe, shows how lobbying and campaign contributions have defanged antitrust regulators, and considers what all this means for free trade, technology, and innovation. For the sake of ordinary Americans, he concludes, government needs to return to what it once did best: keeping the playing field level for competition. It’s time to make American markets great―and free―again.

Review book

Health: “What Are Hernias & How Are They Repaired?”

Think of a hernia like a bulge in a damaged tire. The inner tube or soft tissue is normally contained by the abdominal wall, and if there is a leak or weak spot the soft tissue like fat or intestines can protrude through. Having a hernia will eventually require surgery to repair, and there are several different ways surgeons go about it.

Website

 

Studies: Irregular Sleep Disrupts Pancreatic “Circadian Rhythms”, Leading To Type 2 Diabetes

From a Technology Networks online article:

Technology NetworksBy comparing the pancreatic cells of type 2 diabetic human donors with those of healthy people, researchers at the University of Geneva (UNIGE) and at the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG), Switzerland, were able to demonstrate, for the first time, that the pancreatic islet cells derived from the Type 2 Diabetic human donors bear compromised circadian oscillators.

The disruption of the circadian clocks was concomitant with the perturbation of hormone secretion. Moreover, using clock modulator molecule dubbed Nobiletin, extracted from lemon peel, the researchers succeeded in “repairing” the disrupted cellular clocks and in partial restoring of the islet cell function. These results, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States, provide a first insight into innovative approach for diabetes care.

PNAS Pancreatic Islets from type 2 diabetes

Read full study

The circadian clock system (from Latin “circa diem”, about a day) allows the organisms to anticipate periodical changes of geophysical time, and to adjust to these changes. Nearly all the cells in our body comprise molecular clocks that regulate and synchronize metabolic functions to a 24-hour cycle of day-night changes.

Today, increasing evidence show that disturbances in our internal clocks stemming from frequent time zone changes, irregular working schedules or ageing, have a significant impact on the development of metabolic diseases in human beings, including type-2 diabetes. Such disturbances seem to prevent the proper functioning of the cells in the pancreatic islet that secrete insulin and glucagon, the hormones that regulate blood sugar levels.

To read more