Tag Archives: Economics

World Economic Forum: Top Stories – Jan 6, 2023

World Economic Forum – Top Stories (01/06/23):

0:15 Global Recession 2023 – Kristalina Georgieva, the IMF’s Managing Director, says 2023 will be ‘a difficult year for the world’. The European economy has been severely affected by Russia’s war in Ukraine. Half of the EU will go into recession in 2023, Georgieva says. While for the first time in 40 years, growth in China – the world’s second-largest economy – is not likely to exceed global growth.

2:02 Japan’s worldbeating health system – For more than 50 years, Japan has offered healthcare without restrictions to anyone living in the country for 3 months or more whether or not they are Japanese. Payments are decided on a sliding scale depending on age, residence and income status.

3:26 These pipebots stop water leaks – The tiny bots patrol the inside of pipes. They’re small enough to avoid blocking the pipes and are fitted with sensors, cameras and a microphone. They take pictures and listen to the pipe to detect any faults and weaknesses before these develop into leaks.

4:48 Ukraine uploads their treasures to the cloud – Volunteers use the Backup Ukraine app to scan cultural artifacts – from statues and paintings to buildings, mosaics, and monuments – to preserve the country’s heritage and history from Russian theft, vandalism, and bombing. Backup Ukraine turns these symbols of Ukrainian culture into 3D models, which take their place in a digital archive, safe from Russian attacks.

As of 12 December 2022, UNESCO had verified damage to 227 cultural sites in Ukraine. Russian troops had removed the bones of Prince Potemkin from Kherson, stolen priceless relics of the Scythian Empire, and allegedly stripped thousands of pieces of art from local museums. Backup Ukraine is a collaboration between UNESCO, Blue ShieldDenmark, and the media group Virtue. Watch to learn how Ukrainian culture is being impacted. _____________________________________________

The World Economic Forum is the International Organization for Public-Private Cooperation. The Forum engages the foremost political, business, cultural and other leaders of society to shape global, regional and industry agendas. We believe that progress happens by bringing together people from all walks of life who have the drive and the influence to make positive change.

Previews: The Economist Magazine – January 7, 2023

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The Economist – January 7, 2023 Issue:

A realistic path to a better relationship between Britain and the EU

The question of Europe has caused a decade of turmoil. Here’s how to use the next ten years better

What the Kevin McCarthy saga means for America’s Congress

Power struggles, public humiliation and a government shutdown may follow

Rail Transport: Chicago’s Vulnerability To Strikes

Wall Street Journal (December 19, 2022) – In recent years, the city’s railyards have seen severe bottlenecks as the supply chain choked up nationally. With $3 trillion in goods traveling through Chicago every year, the city is the busiest rail hub in the U.S. WSJ breaks down how important rail is to the region, and how vulnerable the system is to a work stoppage like a strike.

Illustration: Adele Morgan

Analysis: ‘Made In America’ Is Changing In 2022 (FT)

Financial Times – The FT’s global business columnist Rana Foroohar looks at why the US should bring manufacturing jobs back home. In the second of three films based on her new book, ‘Homecoming: the path to prosperity in a post-global world’, she follows the all-American supply chain of clothing company American Giant, to see how it impacts jobs, businesses and communities

Video timeline: 00:00 Made in America, Again 01:20 An all-American supply chain starts here 03:17 What went wrong with globalization? 07:00 The cotton gin – a risky business 09:53 Automation at a high-tech mill 13:16 Why manufacturing is important 19:59 The family-run finishing factory 23:21 Worker innovation at the sewing factory 27:33 Education, training and community 29:07 A moment for change?

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Oct 22, 2022

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Welcome to Britaly

A country of political instability, low growth and subordination to the bond markets

In 2012 liz truss and Kwasi Kwarteng, two of the authors of a pamphlet called “Britannia Unchained”, used Italy as a warning. Bloated public services, low growth, poor productivity: the problems of Italy and other southern European countries were also present in Britain. Ten years later, in their botched attempt to forge a different path, Ms Truss and Mr Kwarteng have helped make the comparison inescapable. Britain is still blighted by disappointing growth and regional inequality. But it is also hobbled by chronic political instability and under the thumb of the bond markets. Welcome to Britaly.

Rising Inflation: The Shelter Index Explained

Changes in the housing market are often delayed in inflation data, which can make things difficult for the Fed. Housing is one of the most weighted categories when tracking inflation, but it’s also one of the most complicated to measure. WSJ’s David Harrison explains how the shelter index is calculated, and why it can muddy the inflation outlook for the Fed. Illustration: Laura Kammermann

Cover Preview: Harvard Magazine – Nov/Dec 2022

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Justice Elena Kagan, in Dissent

Ebbing trust in the Supreme Court, and what to do about it

The Off-Kilter Economy

Reckoning with inflation and its remedies

Energy-Saving, Low-Cost Air Conditioning

Two new technologies could provide an eco-friendly cooling solution.

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Oct 15, 2022

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The Communist Party’s obsession with control will make China weaker but more dangerous

Its five-yearly congress will further tighten one man’s grip

It will be an orderly affair. From October 16th the grandees of China’s Communist Party will gather in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing for their five-yearly congress. Not a teacup will be out of place; not a whisper of protest will be audible. The Communist Party has always been obsessed with control. But under President Xi Jinping that obsession has deepened. After three decades of opening and reform under previous leaders, China has in many ways become more closed and autocratic under Mr Xi. Surveillance has broadened. Censorship has stiffened. Party cells flex their muscles in private firms. Preserving the party’s grip on power trumps any other consideration.

World Economic Forum: Top Stories (Oct 7, 2022)

World Economic Forum top stories of the week: 0:15 – The World’s First flying 3D printer 01:32 – Your outer circle of friends is more important for your career than you think 02:47 – How high interest rates lower inflation 04:47 – This Swedish start up has developed an electric passenger plane

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Oct 8, 2022

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A new macroeconomic era is emerging. What will it look like?

A great rebalancing between governments and central banks is under way.

For months there has been turmoil in financial markets and growing evidence of stress in the world economy. You might think that these are just the normal signs of a bear market and a coming recession. But, as our special report this week lays out, they also mark the painful emergence of a new regime in the world economy—a shift that may be as consequential as the rise of Keynesianism after the second world war, and the pivot to free markets and globalisation in the 1990s.