Tag Archives: Music

Nostalgia Books: “1973 – Rock At The Crossroads” By Andrew Grant Jackson

1973 Rock at the CrossroadsLed Zep’s Houses of the Holy reflected the rise of funk and reggae. The singer songwriter movement led by Bob Dylan, Neil Young, and Joni Mitchell flourished at the Troubadour and Max’s Kansas City, where Bruce Springsteen and Bob Marley shared bill. Elvis Presley’s Aloha from Hawaii via Satellite was NBC’s top-rated special of the year, while Elton John’s albums dominated the number one spot for two and a half months.

A fascinating account of the music and epic social change of 1973, a defining year for David Bowie, Bruce Springsteen, Pink Floyd, Elton John, the Rolling Stones, Eagles, Elvis Presley, and the former members of The Beatles.

1973 was the year rock hit its peak while splintering―just like the rest of the world. Ziggy Stardust travelled to America in David Bowie’s Aladdin Sane. The Dark Side of the Moon began its epic run on the Billboard charts, inspired by the madness of Pink Floyd’s founder, while all four former Beatles scored top ten albums, two hitting #1.

To read more and purchase: https://www.amazon.com/1973-Crossroads-Andrew-Grant-Jackson/dp/1250299985

Top Science Podcasts: Tracking Landslides In Taiwan, The Universality Of Music (ScienceMag)

scimag_pc_logo_120_120 (2)You may have seen the aftermath of a landslide, driving along a twisty mountain road—a scattering of rocks and scree impinging on the pavement. And up until now, that’s pretty much how scientists have tracked landslides—roadside observations and spotty satellite images. Now, researchers are hoping to track landslides systematically by instrumenting an entire national park in Taiwan. The park is riddled with landslides—so much so that visitors wear helmets. Host Sarah Crespi talks with one of those visitors—freelance science journalist Katherine Kornei—about what we can learn from landslides.

In a second rocking segment, Sarah also talks with Manvir Singh about the universality of music. His team asked the big questions in a Science paper out this week: Do all societies make music? What are the common elements that can be picked out from songs worldwide? Sarah and Manvir listen to songs and talk about what love ballads and lullabies have in common, regardless of their culture of origin.

To read more: https://www.sciencemag.org/podcast/building-landslide-observatory-and-universality-music

 

Short Film Showcase: “You Will Not Have My Hatred” In France Directed By Salomon Lightelm (2019)

Edited and Directed by: Salomon Lightelm

Words by: Antoine Leiris
Cinematographer: Zack Spiger
Production Co.: Gang Films
Music Score: AWVFTS

The Letter - You Will Not Have My Hatred Cinematic Poem Short Film Directed By Salomon Leightelm 2019

Filmed at: Chateaux Fontainebleau

“I vividly remember the morning I read these powerful words for the first time. It was a cold November afternoon and a friend of mine had shared it on Instagram. As I was reading, I glanced over at my son playing in the living room – he was 17 months old, and I started coming undone. My wife looked over at me and I couldn’t speak, I just handed her the phone, and she also just came undone. These words had stuck with me for 4 years and they haven’t let go of me. How can a man, who had suffered so much, have a such a spirit of resilience and grace? Thank you Antoine Leiris for seeing the world unlike how most people see it – for showing a way that flows in the opposite direction of hate, and retaliation. Its words like yours that change the world. This film is a contemplative meditation on those words, be patient with it.”

The Letter - You Will Not Have My Hatred Cinematic Poem Short Film Directed By Salomon Leightelm 2019

Website: http://www.ligthelm.work/

Animated Visual Essay: Songwriter “Leonard Cohen” Interview In Video By Joe Donaldson (2019)

Direction, Design & Animation: Joe Donaldson

Original Music and Sound Design: Ambrose Yu
Executive Producer: Soo-Jeong Kang
Senior Producer: Yara Bishara
Senior Editor: Brian Redondo
Producer: Sara Joe Wolansky
Audio Engineer: Jill Du Boff

The New Yorker - Leonard Cohen Animated Visual Essay Directed by Joe Donaldson 2019

“I was recently commissioned by The New Yorker to direct, design, and animate a pilot series of three animated visual essays.

“I know there’s a spiritual aspect to everybody’s life, whether they want to cop to it or not,” he said at one point. “It’s there, you can feel it in people—there’s some recognition that there is a reality that they cannot penetrate but which influences their mood and activity. So that’s operating. . . . Sometimes it’s just, like, ‘You are losing too much weight, Leonard. You’re dying, but you don’t have to coöperate enthusiastically with the process.’ Force yourself to have a sandwich.”

Leonard Cohen (1934 – 2016)

The New Yorker - Leonard Cohen Animated Visual Essay Directed by Joe Donaldson 2019

The first film features the great Leonard Cohen as he reflects on death and preparing for the end. The initial interview, by David Remnick, was recorded at Cohen’s home in Los Angeles a month before he passed away.”

The New Yorker - Leonard Cohen Animated Visual Essay Directed by Joe Donaldson 2019

You can view the full article on The New Yorker here: newyorker.com/culture/video-dept/leonard-cohen-and-the-divine-voice

Short Film Showcase: “Concert Of The Fire” Directed By Mariia Konopatova (2019)

Directed by: Mariia Konopatova

Concert Of The Fire Animated Short Film Directed by Mariia Konopatova 2019

Composer: Yury Konstantinov

“This is a story of struggle between art and death. A violinist finds himself in the middle of a war and is ready to die. Will the music in his heart and a violin in his heands help him to resist Death itself?”

Concert Of The Fire Animated Short Film Directed by Mariia Konopatova 2019

Website: https://vimeo.com/mariikono

 

Top Podcasts: 77-Year Old Rock & Roll Legend Graham Nash Talks About His Albums And Music (PBS)

Graham Nash Interview PBS Nov 2019Two-time Rock and Roll Hall of Fame inductee Graham Nash has hits aplenty spanning his nearly six-decade career. But the 77-year-old singer-songwriter recently chose to perform a special run of shows featuring his lesser-known first two solo albums in their entirety, which together describe a crucial chapter in his personal and artistic life. Tom Casciato recently spoke to Nash to learn more.

Nostalgia: “Abbey Road” – 50 Years Since The Beatles Walked Off Stage (1969)

From a New Yorker Magazine online article:

Beatles Abbey Road Quote from Paul McCartney“Abbey Road” was the Beatles’ last word—the final recordings by the most popular and influential artists of the nineteen-sixties. Now, on the occasion of its fiftieth anniversary, “Abbey Road” has been expertly remixed by Giles Martin, George Martin’s son and protégé, and reissued in a super-deluxe edition that comes with an archive of studio outtakes and a hundred-page book of essays and liner notes that chronicle how the recordings were made. “The Beatles are good even though everybody already knows that they’re good,” the classical composer Ned Rorem observed in 1968, alluding to how the band’s immense popularity confounded the usual notions of discriminating taste. If anyone needs to be reminded of this, this new edition of “Abbey Road” should do the trick.

In the spring of 1969, Paul McCartney telephoned George Martin to ask if he would be willing to work with the Beatles on a new album they planned to record in the months ahead. Martin, who was widely regarded as the most accomplished pop-record producer in the world, had overseen the making of all nine albums and nineteen singles that the Beatles had released in Britain since their début on E.M.I.’s Parlophone label, in 1962. His reputation was synonymous with that of the group, and the fact that McCartney felt a need to ask him about his availability dramatized how much the Beatles’ professional circumstances had changed since the release of the two-record set known as the White Album, in the fall of 1968. In Martin’s view, the five months of tension and drama it took to make that album, followed by the fiasco of “Get Back,” an ill-fated film, concert, and recording project that ended inconclusively in January, 1969, had turned his recent work with the Beatles into a “miserable experience.”

To read more: https://www.newyorker.com/culture/culture-desk/when-the-beatles-walked-offstage-fifty-years-of-abbey-road?utm_campaign