Cannes View: La Palme d’Or Chef Christian Sinicropi’s Brilliant Ceramic Dishes

Set right on the spectacular coast of Cannes, France, La Palme d’Or rests inside the Grand Hyatt Cannes Hotel Martinez. This restaurant has won two Michelin stars, and is most known for its Mediterranean-style dishes. However, the most notable thing about this restaurant is the head chef, who creates bespoke ceramic dishware to for the restaurant to best compliment his unique recipes.

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CHEF CHRISTIAN SINICROPI

Some places you fall in love with at first sight and La Palme d’Or is one of them. In the fabulous Art Deco setting of the Hotel Martinez, diners look down on the famous promenade of La Croisette and the Bay of Cannes, while savouring the luxury and refinement so beautifully brought together here. Of course, all this would be worth nothing without high-calibre cuisine. No worries on that score: chef Christian Sinicropi, a local man, has matters entirely in hand. At each stage of the “Mouvements” set menu, he homes in on one ingredient, supporting it with elements from its own ecosystem. The result is coherent and sophisticated, right down to the remarkably precise desserts by Julien Ochando. Definitely worthy of a Golden Palm award.

Scotland Views: What To See And Do In Glasgow

DW reporter Hannah travelled to her home country of Scotland to give you her bucketlist of everything you need to check out in the city of Glasgow! When you think of Glasgow, the first thing that comes to mind is probably cold and rainy weather. But despite that, Scotland’s largest city is a vibrant, cultural hub. It’s a UNESCO City of Music, and has one of the best live music scenes in the UK. Which of Hannah’s travel tips is your favourite – the museum, the deep-fried Mars bar or the music scene?

Glasgow is a port city on the River Clyde in Scotland’s western Lowlands. It’s famed for its Victorian and art nouveau architecture, a rich legacy of the city’s 18th–20th-century prosperity due to trade and shipbuilding. Today it’s a national cultural hub, home to institutions including the Scottish Opera, Scottish Ballet and National Theatre of Scotland, as well as acclaimed museums and a thriving music scene.

Books: The New York Times Book Review – Oct 9, 2022

The New York Times Book Review October 9 2022

Sex, Violence and Ecstasy: Leonard Cohen’s Early Fiction

A posthumous release of the songwriter’s unseen novel and stories from the 1950s reveals his nascent fascination with human frailty.

The Global Might of the Tiny Chip

Silicon chips power everything from cars and toys to phones and nukes. “Chip War,” by Chris Miller, recounts the rise of the chip industry and the outsize geopolitical implications of its ascendancy.

Ignoramuses Are Gaining Ground, Andy Borowitz Warns

In his new book, the satirist and comedian traces the rise of ill-equipped politicians and considers how to thwart them.

Summer 2022 Walks: Cadiz In Southwest Spain (4K)

Cádiz is an ancient port city in the Andalucia region of southwestern Spain. The home of the Spanish Navy, the port boomed in the 16th-century as a base for exploration and trade. It has more than 100 watchtowers, including the iconic Torre Tavira, which was traditionally used for spotting ships. On the waterfront is the domed, 18th-century Cádiz Cathedral, featuring baroque and neoclassical elements. 

Travel Guide: 36 Hours In New York City (Fall 2022)

36 HOURS – New York City

By Becky Hughes Photographs by Karsten Moran 

Friday – 3:30 p.m. Get a bird’s eye view of the city

Pack in 400 years of history at the Museum of the City of New York in East Harlem ($20 suggested admission), opposite Central Park at the top end of Museum Mile. Its ongoing exhibition, “New York at Its Core,” will give you a glimpse of the neighborhoods you’ll encounter this weekend, and an overview of the many eras of the city’s development, including its few decades as the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam, its 19th-century shift to an immigrant hub, the growth of the city’s park program after the New Deal and the birth of the punk and hip-hop subcultures of the 1970s and 1980s.

6 p.m. – Go grand in Midtown

To the dismay of the too-cool-for-school set, Midtown is having a moment. Rockefeller Center is enticing popular restaurateurs with real-estate deals, aiming to draw locals and tourists alike. One glamorous newcomer is Le Rock, a French brasserie (from the owners of the popular TriBeCa restaurant Frenchette) with a sleek Art Deco design and a pricey (around $200 for two without drinks) menu of chilled oysters ($24 for a half dozen), bison au poivre ($60) and a long list of natural wines. For a night of grand Manhattan opulence, you’re in good hands. Other notable arrivals in the area: Detroit-style slices at Ace’s Pizza, Italian dining with outdoor seating at Lodi (a Times food critic’s favorite) and the 11-seat Blue Ribbon Sushi Bar.

Saturday – 10 a.m. Have a morning nosh

The real breakfast of champions is a pastrami, egg and cheese sandwich ($12.50) at Frankel’s Delicatessen & Appetizing in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. There may be no better representation of New York deli cuisine than the happy marriage between the Jewish staple meat, and the bodega and coffee-cart hero, the bacon, egg and cheese. If securing a window seat is a bust, the benches of McCarren Park across the street are calling your name. And for breakfast dessert (you’re on vacation!): Peter Pan Donut & Pastry Shop. You might recognize the bakery from the 2021 movie “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” but regulars know it for the unparalleled blueberry buttermilk doughnuts ($1.75).

11 a.m. Shop by the skyline

From Greenpoint, the northernmost neighborhood in Brooklyn, the views of the East River are unbeatable. Follow Noble Street all the way to the end, and you’ll find Greenpoint Terminal Market, a marketplace of vendors, every Saturday and Sunday, rain or shine. You’ll get a top-tier view of the Manhattan skyline while you sift through racks of vintage clothes, tables of art and jewelry, and maybe get a really bad portrait made ($5) to commemorate the day. For a little more shopping, try Big Night, a “shop for dinner, parties and dinner parties”; Dobbin St. Vintage Co-op for vintage furniture; and the mini-Japanese market at 50 Norman for housewares by Cibone and customized dashi packs from Dashi Okume.

1:30 p.m. – Dive into NYC ephemera

Hidden away from Williamsburg’s chain coffee shops and boutique gyms is City Reliquary ($7 entry) a tiny, colorful storefront wedged between buildings on Metropolitan Avenue. Inside is a quirky and fascinating collection of New York artifacts curated by this not-for-profit community museum and civic organization. Packed (really packed) into two small rooms, you’ll find defunct subway signage, souvenirs from New York World’s Fairs, samples of rocks from far below the city and an astonishing amount more. Look for the many iterations of paper deli cups, including the iconic Anthora cup (designed by Leslie Buck in the 1960s), which you’ll still see at diners and bodegas today.

6 p.m. – Dine in the heart of the Village

Greenwich Village cynics will complain about its restaurants: Lines everywhere, many cash-only and littered with celebrities and the rubberneckers that follow. For first-time Village diners, though, Bar Pitti unfailingly delivers an entertaining night out. Get there around 6 p.m. (with cash — no cards accepted) and there should be a short wait. Order the eggplant Parmesan if it’s on the chalkboard of specials ($14.50), pappardelle in a pink cream sauce ($23.50) and a bottle of Lambrusco ($50). The best Italian food in New York? It’s probably not the best on its block. But the brash-yet-somehow-charming service, prime location and killer people-watching makes Bar Pitti a true New York affair. For a more relaxed alternative, Malatesta Trattoria has an excellent tagliatelle ragu ($17, cash-only) and a lower-key ambience.

To state the obvious: You can’t see New York City in 36 hours. You could easily fill a couple of days eating your way down one street in Jackson Heights, Queens, or spend an entire weekend uncovering corners of Central Park. This guide is not designed to check landmarks off a list, but rather to offer visitors one slice of life in New York (minus the laundry schlepping and skyrocketing rent). Below you’ll find a subterranean piano bar, a hidden garden, market shopping against the backdrop of an unbeatable skyline and some big-picture and hyperlocal history to bring you a little closer to feeling the gestalt of the city.

Read more at The New York Times

2022 Walks: Den Bosch In Southern Netherlands

‘S-Hertogenbosch (Den Bosch) is a medieval town full of historic buildings, museums, independent shops and cool cafés and restaurants. Come with us on this Netherlands 4K walking tour and discover not only the medieval architecture but how Den Bosch cafe life is alive and vibrant. Enjoy the city centre walk through ‘S-Hertogenbosch (Den Bosch) showing the towns street life. You can also see what the s-Hertogenbosch/Den Bosch weather is like in the late summer and Autumn.

France View: Argelès-sur-Mer – Capital Of Camping

One of the most popular holiday destinations for French people is the campsite. Argelès-sur-Mer, in the eastern Pyrenees, is the town with the largest amount of camping accommodation in Europe. In the summer, this Western corner of the Mediterranean sees its population increase tenfold. We meet two brothers who run a campsite in Argelès.

Argelès-sur-Mer is a town on France’s Mediterranean coast. It’s known for the long Argelès Beach with its seafront promenade. In the Catalan-style old town, 14th-century Notre-Dame del Prat Church has views from its bell tower. Valmy Park to the south includes trails, a 19th-century castle and the Aigles de Valmy bird zoo. To the north, Mas Larrieu Natural Reserve is home to herons, gulls and bee-eaters.

Cover Preview: Barron’s Magazine – Oct 10, 2022

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The U.S. Dollar Is Superstrong. 8 Ways to Invest Abroad

The U.S. dollar got a brief, welcome walloping this past week, falling 1.5% on Tuesday alone against a basket of six major currencies. It remains up a hefty 17% for the year, and close to its strongest level in decades. That matters for ordinary savers, and not just forex flippers.

Rivian Is Recalling Nearly All Vehicles It’s Produced. The Move Shows the Challenges of Building Cars.

Payrolls Are Strong, Oil Is Rising. But the Fed Seems Intent on Raising Rates.

Chipotle Set to Test a Speedy Robo Burrito Maker

Tax-Loss Selling Is Wall Street’s Refuge in a Down Market

News Analysis: Midterm Election, Nuclear Threat

New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week in politics, including October surprises in the U.S. and crises on the world stage with just a month until the midterms.

Front Page: The New York Times – October 8, 2022

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U.S. Job Growth Eases, but Is Too Strong to Suit Investors

The gain of 263,000 was shy of recent monthly totals but still robust. Stocks fell on fears of a harder, longer Fed campaign to fight inflation.

In Record Numbers, Venezuelans Risk a Deadly Trek to Reach the U.S. Border

Two crises are converging at the perilous land bridge known as the Darién Gap: the economic and humanitarian disaster underway in South America, and the bitter fight over immigration policy in Washington.

Biden Administration Clamps Down on China’s Access to Chip Technology

The White House issued sweeping restrictions on selling semiconductors and chip-making equipment to China, an attempt to curb the country’s access to critical technologies.