Tag Archives: New York City

Cocktail Scene: “Dante” In New York City Voted “2019 Worlds Best Bar”

From a Food & Wine online article:

Dante NYC Negroni…at Camden’s Roundhouse in London, the annual list of the World’s 50 Best Bars was announced—and this year, New York’s Dante took home the grand prize. The West Village aperitivo bar and restaurant, which is famous for its extensive Negroni menu (and pop-up Negroni fountain), was ranked in 9th place on last year’s list, and also won “World’s Best Bar” and “Best American Restaurant Bar” at Tales of the Cocktail in New Orleans earlier this year. 

The World's 50 Best BarsThe World’s 50 Best Bars 2019

1. Dante–New York

2. Connaught Bar–London

3. Florería Atlántico–Buenos Aires

4. The NoMad–New York

5. American Bar–London

6. The Clumsies–Athens

7. Attaboy–New York City

8. Atlas–Singapore

9. The Old Man–Hong Kong

10. Licorería Limantour–Mexico City

11. Manhattan–Singapore

12. Native–Singapore

13. Carnaval–Lima

14. Katana Kitten–New York

15. Guilhotina–São Paulo

16. Three Sheets–London

17. Himkok–Oslo

18. High Five–Tokyo

19. Salmón Gurú–Madrid

20. Paradiso–Barcelona

To read more: https://www.foodandwine.com/news/worlds-best-bars-2019?did=446693-20191021&utm_campaign=faw-travel-tips_newsletter&utm_source=foodandwine.com&utm_medium=email&utm_content=102119&cid=446693&mid=25675223965

Architecture: The Frank Lloyd Wright Designed Guggenheim Museum Celebrates 60th Year

Frank Lloyd Wright Guggenheim MuseumThis year marks the 60th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright’s building for the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum. Since opening its doors on October 21, 1959, the architectural icon has inspired countless visitors and is widely seen as Wright’s masterpiece.

From its opening to the present day, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum has been an unparalleled physical and cultural presence in the New York landscape.

Over the course of the sixteen-year period between the commissioning of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in 1943 and its 1959 opening, the project underwent a series of revisions. The iconic spiral form remained primarily unchanged, but a close reading of documents in the Guggenheim Museum Archives sheds additional light on an array of obscure details that were designed out over time to accommodate budgetary, programmatic, and structural needs and constraints.

To read more: https://www.guggenheim.org/the-frank-lloyd-wright-building

Top New Exhibitions: “The Last Knight” At The Metropolitan Museum, NYC Through Jan 5, 2020

From the MetMuseum.org online:

The Last Knight Metropolitan Museum of Art Exhibition BookThe Last Knight: The Art, Armor, and Ambition of Maximilian I examines the profound significance of European armor at the dawn of the Renaissance, through the lens of Emperor Maximilian I’s (1459–1519) remarkable life. On view only at The Met, The Last Knight coincides with the five-hundredth anniversary of Maximilian’s death, and is the most ambitious North American loan exhibition of European arms and armor in decades. Including 180 objects selected from some thirty public and private collections in Europe, the Middle East, and the United States, The Last Knight will explore how Maximilian’s unparalleled passion for the trappings and ideals of knighthood served his boundless worldly ambitions, imaginative stratagems, and resolute efforts to forge a lasting personal and family legacy.

This exhibition features many works of art on view outside Europe for the first time, including Maximilian’s own sumptuous armors that highlight his patronage of the greatest European armorers of his age, as well as related manuscripts, paintings, sculpture, glass, tapestry, and toys, all of which emphasize the emperor’s dynastic ambitions and the centrality of chivalry at the imperial court and beyond.

To read more: https://www.metmuseum.org/exhibitions/listings/2019/last-knight-art-armor-ambition-maximilian?utm_source=Exhibitions&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=2019_1019_Met_Exhibitions

Cultural Events: Museum Of Modern Art (MoMA) Reopens On October 21

From a New York Curbed.com online article:

MoMA Reopens Curbed NYThere’s also a special focus on architecture and design in this new approach to the collection: Several galleries are devoted to various aspects of those fields, including “The Vertical City,” an examination of skyscraper construction that includes photos by Berenice Abbott, Hugh Ferriss’s architectural drawings, and other ephemera. Elsewhere, building models of the Guggenheim and a spec design of MoMA by modernist master William Lescaze emphasize the importance of architecture to museums, and vice versa.

…the museum is about to reveal its most ambitious revamp yet: On October 21, MoMA will open its expanded headquarters, which now takes up most of the block on 53rd Street between Fifth and Sixth avenues. The museum has pushed westward, opening more than 40,000 square feet of fresh galleries in both a ground-up building (which rose from the ashes of the Tod Williams Billie Tsien Architects-designed American Folk Art Museum) and the base of Jean Nouvel’s supertall skyscraper next door.

The galleries aren’t all that’s been added, though: The museum has also opened a new, expansive lobby—which has two galleries that can be visited free of charge—as well as a spacious gift shop that has been relocated below street level. A wall of windows gives passersby a glimpse into the space, and is intended as a gesture of “increased transparency,” according to the museum.

To read more: https://ny.curbed.com/2019/10/11/20908427/museum-of-modern-art-expansion-open-photos

 

Iconic Restaurants: Remembering “Windows On The World” At The World Trade Center

From an Eater.com online article:

The view from Windows on the World, in this photo taken in 1977, included Governors Island and the Statue of Liberty Getty ImagesThe light is different, higher contrast. Real-life chiaroscuro. And sound is muted, still, almost absent. Except when the wind is kicking up a tremendous, otherworldly, howl. And the city looks so small, innocent, like a child’s train set, the Statue of Liberty a tchotchke in a tourist shop. Sixty-mile views that reach the Hudson Highlands up north, the Atlantic Ocean to the east and south, and, much closer, planes landing and taking off at three major airports.

There are few New York City restaurants more storied than Windows on the World. The restaurant made its debut on the 107th floor of the World Trade Center’s North Tower in 1976, offering sweeping views of Manhattan, Brooklyn, and New Jersey — the earth itself peppered with the buildings, the bridges, the Statue of Liberty; the sky with tourist helicopters. “Windows was a shining ambassador for New York, an escape from a city that was, in decades past, drug addled, dirty, and crime-ridden below,” Eater NY’s Ryan Sutton reminisced in 2014. “Even if you didn’t know much about fine dining, you knew such a dream-like place existed, and you knew that it came tumbling down on September 11, 2001.”

To read more: https://www.eater.com/2019/9/17/20862698/world-trade-center-restaurant-windows-on-the-world-history-design-book-excerpt

Top New Travel Videos: “Civilization – Timelapse /// Hyperlapse 4K” By Michael Shainblum (2019)

Filmed, Edited and Directed by: Michael Shainblum

Civilization Timelapse Hyperlapse 4K by Michael Shainblum 2019

City timelapses and hyperlapses from around the world. This is a collection of my favorite cityscape timelapses from over the years. The video is a mix of static shots, motion controlled timelapses and manual hyperlapse shots. I really hope you all enjoy the video and thanks so much for watching!

Civilization Timelapse Hyperlapse 4K by Michael Shainblum 2019

Places featured in the video:
Dubai UAE
New York City, New York
Los Angeles, California
San Francisco, California
Doha, Qatar
Singapore,
Shanghai, China
Hong Kong,
Venice, Italy
Cinque Terre, Italy
Seattle, Washington
and a castle in Scotland.

Civilization Timelapse Hyperlapse 4K by Michael Shainblum 2019

Website: http://www.shainblumphoto.com/

Exhibitions: Bertoldo di Giovanni – Renaissance of Sculpture in Medici Florence, Opens Sept. 18 At The Frick Collection NYC

Bertoldo di Giovanni (ca. 1440–1491)This fall, The Frick Collection will present the first-ever exhibition on the Florentine sculptor Bertoldo di Giovanni (ca. 1440–1491), a renowned student of Donatello, a teacher of Michelangelo, and a great favorite of Lorenzo “il Magnifico” de’ Medici, his principal patron. More than twenty statues, reliefs, medals, and statuettes — constituting nearly his entire extant oeuvre — will be on view exclusively at the Frick, which houses the only sculptural figure by Bertoldo outside of Europe. The exhibition will800px-Bertoldo_di_giovanni,_medaglia_della_congiura_dei_pazzi_(lorenzo),_1478 highlight the ingenuity of the artist’s designs across media, including bronze, wood, and terracotta, and provide the first chance to fully explore longstanding questions of attribution, function, groupings, and intended display. Bertoldo di Giovanni: The Renaissance of Sculpture in Medici Florence will bring into focus the sculptor’s unique position at the heart of the artistic and political landscape in fifteenth-century Italy.

To read more: https://www.frick.org/exhibitions/bertoldo?utm_source=Frick+eNews&utm_campaign=8cb95d1fae-Acquisition_Bertoldo_2019&utm_medium=email&utm_term=0_518a4c86ac-8cb95d1fae-364490665