Category Archives: Food

Reviews: Top New England Road Trip Foodie Places

14 Great New England Road Trip Food Spots

The Green Spot | Oakland, Maine

Expect killer pies and great lobster rolls at this beloved gourmet grocery and café.

Sunny Day Diner | Lincoln, NH

This cute-as-a-button spot makes superb banana bread French toast and a road trip–worthy Reuben.

Red Hen Baking | Middlesex, VT

Some of the best breads in New England are baked here. Don’t miss the egg sandwiches and tartines.

King Arthur Baking Café, Bakery & Store | Norwich, VT

From bread, jam, and porridge to a perfect grilled cheese, this café has day-trippers covered.

Four Aces Diner | West Lebanon, NH

There’s a 1952 Worcester diner car hidden in this non-descript building, and its eggs Benedict and poutine are terrific.

Bob’s Clam Hut | Kittery, ME

While the menu is vast, it’s really all about the fried clams (ask for them “Bob’s style”).

Puritan Backroom | Manchester, NH

They claim to have invented chicken tenders, so you have to try them — either straight up or baked parmigiana-style.

The Farm Table | Bernardston, MA

Several restaurants inside Kringle Candle serve brunch through dinner (hit the more casual Tavern for excellent flatbreads).

Publick House | Sturbridge, MA

The bread basket, with its cornbread and sticky buns, is the stuff of legend. So is the classic turkey dinner.

Modern Diner | Pawtucket, RI

You can’t miss with any of the many daily specials here, but we love the chouriço special and yummy custard French toast.

Rein’s Deli | Vernon, CT

Of course the main route between NYC and Boston has a terrific deli. Love the matzo ball soup and corned beef.

Dottie’s Diner | Woodbury, CT

The doughnuts here are so beloved, their recipes are held like state secrets. Same with the plump, buttery chicken pies.

The Lunch Box | Meriden, CT

This is the best place to try Connecticut’s signature steamed cheeseburgers, full stop.

Clam Castle | Madison, CT

Come for fried fish and hot butter lobster rolls, then — if you time it right — catch a beach sunset at Hammonasset State Park.

Where are your favorite spots in New England to get road trip food?

These “Editors’ Picks for Food Lovers” originally appeared in the May/June 2018 issue of Yankee

Food Stories: “The Mighty Oyster” In Baltimore Magazine – October 2021

BY LYDIA WOOLEVER

“The largest genuine Maryland oyster—the veritable bivalve of the Chesapeake, still to be had at oyster roasts down the river and at street stands along the wharves—is as large as your open hand,” wrote Mencken in 1913. “A magnificent, matchless reptile! Hard to swallow? Dangerous? Perhaps to the novice, the dastard. But to the veteran of the raw bar, the man of trained and lusty esophagus, a thing of prolonged and kaleidoscopic flavors, a slow slipping saturnalia, a delirium of joy!”

H.L. MENCKEN WAS ONTO SOMETHING when he declared the Chesapeake Bay the “immense protein factory.” Abundant with marine life, the nation’s largest estuary has fed its inhabitants for millennia. And while there have always been crabs and rockfish, one species in particular has stood out as an especially vital source of edible and ecological significance. Ugly, strange, sexy, controversial—the small but mighty oyster.

We know, we know. They’re not for everyone. But for anyone living in Maryland—let alone in Baltimore, which was once known as Oyster City—the peculiar, polarizing, pivotal creature is more than just a slippery shellfish. In fact, it’s quite worthy of the title “natural wonder:” a tiny filter feeder so environmentally advantageous that it could once clean the entire bay in a matter of days. A teeny reef builder whose homemade habitats provide shelter for other species but also protection from natural disasters and climate change. A tasty specimen of seafood that built towns, ignited wars, and served as an economic powerhouse—forever imprinting on our cuisine and sense of place.

Read more

Views: ‘Solomillo’ Steak In Barranquilla, Columbia

Barranquilla, the capital of Colombia’s Atlántico Department, is a bustling seaport flanked by the Magdalena River. The city is known for its enormous Carnival, which brings together flamboyantly costumed performers, elaborate floats and cumbia music. In the chic neighborhood of El Prado, the Museo Romántico showcases artifacts from past festivals and exhibits on famous Colombians, like writer Gabriel García Márquez.

Inside Views: The Toyosu Seafood Market in Tokyo

How a 600-pound tunafish sells for $3 million

Toyosu Market in Tokyo is home to the world-famous tuna bidding wars each morning. But overfishing is starting to take its toll on marine life.

Analysis: The Truth About Buying Organic Foods

The organic food industry is a booming business. U.S. organic sales surged in 2020, jumping by 12.4% to $61.9 billion. With consumers being more health conscious than ever, they’re willing to pay more for what they perceive as better. But, what exactly does “organic” mean?

Analysis: ‘Dark Stores’ Speed Up Grocery Delivery

Speedy grocery delivery is booming, but competition and high running costs could hinder growth. Startups are promising to deliver groceries to your doorstep in minutes, stepping up competition in the industry. Their strategy: to operate out of “dark stores.” WSJ visits some of these hyperlocal warehouses to see how they operate and the challenges they face. Photo/Video: Michelle Inez Simon

Health: Foods That Fight Inflammation (Harvard)

Views: Smoking Copper River Salmon In Alaska

In this video we are smoking some of my favorite fish; Copper River Red Salmon. We caught the salmon ourselves earlier this summer. We are using a simple brine made of water, salt and pure maple syrup. The smoking itself takes about two hours once the fish is properly dried. It is absolutely delicious.

The Copper River or Ahtna River, Ahtna Athabascan ‘Atna’tuu, “river of the Ahtnas”, Tlingit Eeḵhéeni, “river of copper”, is a 290-mile river in south-central Alaska in the United States. It drains a large region of the Wrangell Mountains and Chugach Mountains into the Gulf of Alaska. 

Island Views: Culture, Cuisine & History Of Corfu

Julia visits the lush Ionian island of Corfu, often called the least Greek of all the Greek islands. She discovers a little slice of Italy, and samples the delights of its cuisine. Her trip begins in the capital Corfu Town where she discovers a surprising cosmopolitan city more like slice of Italy than Greece.

Inside Views: New York Michelin-Starred Korean Steakhouse ‘Cote’ (Video)

NYC’s Cote is the only Michelin-starred Korean steakhouse in the world. See what it takes for its team of highly trained chefs to get ready for dinner service as they prepare about 3,000 pounds of beef per week and hundreds of plates of banchan for the restaurant’s Korean barbecue-style service.

Credits: Director/Producer: Daniel Geneen Camera: Connor Reid, Murilo Ferriera Editor: Daniel Geneen