Category Archives: Food

Culinary Travel: ‘Truffle Hunting In Croatia’ (Video)

Truffle hunters and their dogs are combing Croatia’s northwest as the winter hunting season for the delicacy gets under way.

A truffle is the fruiting body of a subterranean ascomycete fungus, predominantly one of the many species of the genus Tuber. In addition to Tuber, many other genera of fungi are classified as truffles including Geopora, Peziza, Choiromyces, Leucangium, and over a hundred others.

Truffles — the non-chocolate kind, sorry — are edible fungi, like mushrooms. … Though multiple species are found worldwide, prestige truffles come from specific areas, much like wine from celebrated regions of Europe and California. Black truffles from France and white truffles from Italy are the two most highly valued.

Foods: ‘Expert Beekeepers Harvesting Honey From Two Million Bees’ (Video)

Zach & Zoe Sweet Bee Farm owners Kam and Summer Johnson started keeping bees after learning how raw and local honey could benefit their son, who suffered with asthma and seasonal allergies. After studying how to best keep bees, harvest honey, and keep up their own bee farm, they were able to sell their local honey to restaurants around NYC, and even have a shop in Chelsea Market. https://zachandzoe.co/

Culture: The Food, Sights & Architecture Of Japan

From wandering between Tateyama’s Snow Wall to spending a night in a Koyasan temple, we take you through Japan’s travel spectrum showing the best food places, architecture, sights, thrills, and shopping experiences.

Food – Dotonbori District: The Dotonbori district is the most colorful area in Osaka. When visiting you must try takoyaki and okonomiyaki. Shin-Yokohama Raumen Museum: Taste nine different types of ramen at the world’s first food-themed amusement park.

Architecture – Koyasan: Temples and shrines can be found all throughout Japan. Tourists can experience Buddhist lifestyle through traditional practices by spending a night in a Koyasan temple. Reversible Destiny Lofts: The space is meant to challenge your mind and body to interact with your living space in a new way to allow new possibilities daily. It is made up of only three shapes. Shirakawa-go Village: Declared a UNESCO World Heritage site in 1995 for its gassho-zukuri houses, the thatched roofs without nails are symbolic of hands pressed together in prayer.

Sights – Tateyama Snow Wall: The Snow Corridor of Tateyama rises up to 65 feet. Bonin Islands: During the second world war, the islands were used as military bases, so if you enjoy diving, you are likely to see many shipwrecks. Nagano’s Jigokudani Monkey Park: In Nagano’s Jigokudani Monkey Park there are no barriers. These monkeys are the only ones in the world that enjoy bathing in hot springs.

Thrills – Hokkaido: Hokkaido has light, powdery snow perfect for snowboarding or skiing in the winter. Yonaguni: Nevertheless, the Yonaguni monument requires a 9 to 52 foot dive to reach the bottom, and it is recommended that you have at least 100 hours of logged diving experience.

Shopping – Kanazawa: This city is most famous for its teahouses and geisha and samurai districts, along with its gold leaf production. Akihabara: Akihabara, also known as Electric Town, is a hub for all things electronics, game paraphernalia, anime, and manga. Canal City: Called a city within a city, Canal City is a large shopping mall and entertainment center in Fukuoka.

Online Shopping: How 3 Million Grocery Items Are Delivered Each Day (Video)

Each week, e-grocer FreshDirect delivers 100,000 grocery boxes direct to customers’ doors. It all happens from its Bronx warehouse, the size of 11 football fields. Using an advanced AI system, temperature controls, nine miles of conveyor belt, and a fleet of delivery trucks, the company is able to cut out three steps in the normal grocery store supply chain. Business Insider visited the warehouse to see how the company moves 3 million grocery items a week in the face of unprecedented pandemic demand.

Fast Food: ‘How Much It Costs To Open An Arby’s’

Arby’s is one of America’s favorite fast food sandwich chains. They “have the meats,” according to award-winning actor Ving Rhames’ voice in the brand’s iconic commercials.

Arby’s has been known for its roast beef sandwiches since Leroy and Forrest Raffel opened the first Arby’s in 1964. They wanted to stand out in a sea of burger joints by offering something different: roast beef. They later added cheddar cheese sauce, red onion, and a toasted onion roll to the sandwich in 1978.

Flash forward, and Arby’s has started selling its famous meats by the pound. The fast food-chain also adds limited-time options to attract a variety of customers, such as an upgraded prime rib sandwich, and chicken cheddar ranch sandwich.

Today, Arby’s clearly wants to be seen as more than the place with roast beef. In fact, a campaign was launched called “Head of Sandwiches,” the main purpose of which was to promote the other sandwich options available at Arby’s. The campaign has been successful in attracting a younger consumer into the restaurant, according to Forbes.

Arby’s is currently owned by one of the largest restaurant companies in the U.S., Inspire Brands. In addition to Arby’s, Inspire Brands also owns Sonic, Buffalo Wild Wings, and Jimmy John’s. All combined, there are more than 11,000 restaurants, 1,400 franchisees, and $14.6 billion in system sales within the group, according to the company. Inspire Brands has recently filed trademarks for names of possible ghost kitchens which would offer delivery and takeout only a move that could put them ahead of several quick service chains.

If all this sounds enticing, here’s what you’ll need: The Arby’s team expects all franchise candidates to have extensive multi-unit restaurant operator experience, as well as a desire to open multiple Arby’s locations. You’ll also need a minimum of $500,000 in liquid capital, and a net worth of at least $1 million. Breaking it down further, according to Franchise Gator, Arby’s initial license fee is $37,500 for the first restaurant unit, and $25,000 for each additional store. Royalty fees are an additional 4 percent of gross sales. National and local advertising are additional fees 1.2 and 3 percent of gross sales respectively. Still on board?

Let’s keep going. Arby’s president Jim Taylor recently addressed 700 Arby’s franchisees, telling them, How is Arby’s innovating? Remember the pork belly sandwich, or the marrot, Arby’s meat carrot? Arby’s was also one of the first fast food chains to say it would never serve plant-based meat, according to Food & Wine. Still on the fence? Let’s look at a few more details about Arby’s.

As a franchisee of any corporation, what other franchisees do can trickle down to your stores. While you may own your own restaurants, you are still part of a big family. Arby’s ordered the franchisee to remove the sign and publicly issued an apology — but perhaps the PR damage was done. Which brings us to our next point to consider. Could it be better to open your own independent restaurant in lieu of a franchise? There are pros and cons to both scenarios.

As a franchisee, you benefit from branding, training, marketing, and ingredient sourcing, but also pay fees and royalties, lose some control as an owner, and are subject to scrutiny by the franchise. As an independent owner, you can control your own brand, marketing, menu, and hours, but you also start with no brand recognition, resources, training, or access to suppliers. So what did you decide?

If you’re interested in peddling those famous Arby’s meats, alongside the popular, perfectly seasoned curly fries, submit a franchise application online at Arby’s. Keep watching to see Here’s How Much It Really Costs To Open An Arby’s Franchise.

Diet Study: The Top 250 U.S. Movies Depict Unhealthy Foods & Drinks (Stanford)

Stanford researchers examined the 250 top-grossing American movies of recent decades and found the on-screen foods and beverages largely failed U.S. government nutrition recommendations and U.K. youth advertising standards.

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Food & Culture: ‘Pekin Noodle Parlor – Oldest Chinese Restaurant In U.S.’

The oldest continuously-running Chinese restaurant in the United States, the Pekin Noodle Parlor, has been feeding customers in Butte, Montana, since 1911. Correspondent Luke Burbank visits the multi-generational family business and takes a step into culinary history.