Tag Archives: Southwestern Spain

Travel: A Local’s Guide To Cádiz In Southwest Spain

Cádiz is an ancient port city in the Andalucia region of southwestern Spain. The home of the Spanish Navy, the port boomed in the 16th-century as a base for exploration and trade. It has more than 100 watchtowers, including the iconic Torre Tavira, which was traditionally used for spotting ships. On the waterfront is the domed, 18th-century Cádiz Cathedral, featuring baroque and neoclassical elements.

Aerial Views: Cádiz – Southwestern Spain (4K)

Cádiz is an ancient port city in the Andalucia region of southwestern Spain. The home of the Spanish Navy, the port boomed in the 16th-century as a base for exploration and trade. It has more than 100 watchtowers, including the iconic Torre Tavira, which was traditionally used for spotting ships. On the waterfront is the domed, 18th-century Cádiz Cathedral, featuring baroque and neoclassical elements. 

Aerial Views: ‘Cádiz’ In Southwestern Spain

Cádiz is an ancient port city in the Andalucia region of southwestern Spain. The home of the Spanish Navy, the port boomed in the 16th-century as a base for exploration and trade. It has more than 100 watchtowers, including the iconic Torre Tavira, which was traditionally used for spotting ships. On the waterfront is the domed, 18th-century Cádiz Cathedral, featuring baroque and neoclassical elements. 

Walks: ‘Mijas Pueblo’ In Málaga, Spain (4K Video)

Mijas Pueblo is the historical core of the municipality of Mijas, situated in the heart of the Costa del Sol in southwestern Spain. It lies only 30 kilometres from Málaga Airport. It has a varied landscape that goes from the mountains all the way to the sea.

The area of Mijas is mostly mountainous with growing developments along the coast and on the gentler parts of the mountain slopes. The Pasadas and Ojen rivers cross this area, they join to form the Rio Fuengirola which flows into the sea almost on the limits between Fuengirola and Mijas.

The Municipality, one of the largest in the Province of Málaga, with 147 km² is divided into three different urban areas: Mijas Pueblo, conserving the charm of a traditional Andalucian “white village”, Las Lagunas on the coast (the most modern area of Mijas where you can find industrial and commercial areas), and La Cala, a small seaside village in the centre of the 12 kilometres of beaches on the Mijas coast.

Inhabited since ancient times, a small village Mijas was devoted mainly to agriculture and fisheries to the explosion of the tourist boom in the 1950s. Since then, tourism and construction sector have been the engines of local economy, triggering at the same time the population and per capita income, albeit at a high environmental cost. Today it is a multicultural city with a high percentage of residents of foreign origin and a major residential centers of tourism in Andalusia.

The maze of narrow, cobbled streets dotted with white whitewashed houses contrasted by colorful flower pots and flowers that decorate the balconies, is an image that will remain etched in your mind about Mijas Pueblo.