Tag Archives: Scotland

Morning News: Philippines ‘Bongbong’ Marcos And Scotland Independence

It is a remarkable turnaround for a notorious family: the late dictator’s son just took the reins. But how will he govern? Scotland’s separatist party is again pushing for an independence referendum.

That will probably fail—and empower the very prime minister that many Scots love to hate. And, why pilots in Ukraine are using an outdated, inaccurate missile-delivery technique.

Cover Preview: Scotland Magazine – July/Aug 2022

SCOTLAND MAGAZINE

Published six times a year, every issue of Scotland showcases its stunning landscapes and natural  beauty, and delves deep into Scottish history. From mysterious clans and famous Scots (both past and present), to the hidden histories of the country’s greatest castles and houses, Scotland‘s pages brim with the soul and secrets of the country.
Scotland magazine captures the spirit of this wild and wonderful nation, explores its history and heritage and recommends great places to visit, so you feel at home here, wherever you are in the world.

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Nature: ‘The Glen Beyond’ – A Canoe Journey Into The Scottish Highlands

In February 2022, the British Isles were hit by three consecutive storms, some of the strongest seen in decades. In the days before the storms arrived, we decided to change the plan for our canoeing expedition whilst we were already on our way to Scotland. Instead of paddling the exposed lochs along the west coast, we opted for a more sheltered location. A glen tucked away right in the heart of the highlands. This film showcases the highlights of our journey.

Read the full article written by Ian Finch here: https://www.sidetracked.com/the-glen-…

Scotland Home Of Year: Eco Cottage, Biggar (2022)

The SHOTY judges check out Pentland View in Elsrickle, Biggar, an eco-cottage dating back to the 1890s, which has undergone a major renovation, including a contemporary extension.

See more from Anna Campbell Jones, Michael Angus and Kate Spiers in Scotland’s Home Of The Year here, including more from Glasgow and the Clyde Valley region, here: https://bbc.in/3jldkyh

Travel Short Film: ‘Würm – A Scotland Journey’

Würm – A Scotland Journey is a short and non narrative drone film about Scotland landscape.

History of Scotland seems to begin 12 000 years ago after the Würm Ice age. During 3 weeks in august 2019 we crossed the highlands, Skye and Mull chased by clouds and rain. Behind every mountain, every Loch and every cliff, we discover beautiful landscapes, waterfall and colors forged by millions years. In this film I tried to transcribe the beauty of this country.

Awards and selection :
– Best drone Video : Yucca Valley Film Festival
– Outstanding Achievement Awards – Berlin Flash Film Festival
– Outstanding Achievement Awards – Tagore International Film Festival
– Official Selection Hollywood Art And Movie Festival
– Official Selection AZ Drone Festival
– Official Selection Accordi Disaccordi International Film Festival
– Official Selection Eho Mountain Film Festival
– Official Selection International Festival of Outdoor Films
– Official Selection – Khariv inbternational festival of arts and travel
– Official Selection – Blue 2 Blue dron Film Festival
– Official Selection – Best Of User by Parrot

Views: Glencoe And The Highlands In Scotland

This cinematic travel film features mountain hikes in Glencoe and Beinn Eighe National Nature Reserve.

Chapters: 0:00:00 – Intro 1:01:00 – Ascent 6:08:13 – Plateau 7:11:00 – Descent

Glencoe is a village in western Scotland. It lies in steep-sided Glencoe valley, in the Scottish Highlands. The area is known for waterfalls and trails that climb peaks such as Buachaille Etive Mor and Bidean nam Bian. In the village, Glencoe Folk Museum occupies 18th-century thatched cottages, with displays on local heritage and the Glencoe massacre of 1692. Wildlife in the area includes red deer and golden eagles.

Walks: Dean Village In Edinburgh, Scotland (4K)

Dean Village is a peaceful village on the Water of Leith, Edinburgh’s largest river. Founded during the twelfth century by the Canons Regular of Holyrood Abbey, it is also known as the Water of Leith Village.

Dean Village (dene means “deep valley” in Scots) was a prosperous hamlet for over 800 years. In the past, the area had eleven working mills on the strong currents of the city’s river.

Trade in Dean Village diminished and the village soon fell into decay and abandonment especially during the second half of the twentieth century. Ten years later, the greenness, tranquillity and proximity of the hamlet to the city centre made this area extremely popular and plans to redevelop it were put into place. It quickly became one of the most sought-out residential parts of Edinburgh.

Preservation: Cairngorms National Park, Scotland

“When it comes to climate change, scale is essential. We need to be scaling up our work and being really bold and ambitious, and that’s exactly what Cairngorms Connect is.” Find out how Scotland’s largest landscape-scale restoration project is fighting back against climate change in our new film for Cairngorms Connect.

Cairngorms National Park is a national park in northeast Scotland, established in 2003. It was the second of two national parks established by the Scottish Parliament, after Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park, which was set up in 2002. The park covers the Cairngorms range of mountains, and surrounding hills. Already the largest national park in the United Kingdom, in 2010 it was expanded into Perth and Kinross.

Roughly 18,000 people reside within the 4,528 square kilometre national park. The largest communities are Aviemore, Ballater, Braemar, Grantown-on-Spey, Kingussie, Newtonmore, and Tomintoul. Tourism makes up about 80% of the economy.[4] In 2018, 1.9 million tourism visits were recorded. The majority of visitors are domestic, with 25 per cent coming from elsewhere in the UK, and 21 per cent being from other countries.

Scotland View: Edinburgh – Old Town & City Center

Edinburgh is Scotland’s compact, hilly capital. It has a medieval Old Town and elegant Georgian New Town with gardens and neoclassical buildings. Looming over the city is Edinburgh Castle, home to Scotland’s crown jewels and the Stone of Destiny, used in the coronation of Scottish rulers. Arthur’s Seat is an imposing peak in Holyrood Park with sweeping views, and Calton Hill is topped with monuments and memorials. 

Video Timeline: 00:00 Waterloo Pl 02:13 The Balmoral 04:30 Princes St 05:55 Edinburgh Waverley Station 09:00 Scott Monument 13:33 The Royal Scottish Academy 14:00 Princes Street Gardens 14:32 Scottish National Gallery 15:30 The Mound 17:05 New College, The University of Edinburgh 21:12 Tolbooth Kirk 21:50 The Royal Mile – Castlehill – Scottish Great Highland Bagpipe 25:05 Edinburgh Castle 29:07 The Royal Mile 33:30 George IV Bridge and National Library of Scotland 34:40 Victoria St 38:30 Grassmarket 41:46 Edinburgh Castle 46:00 Candlemaker Row 49:43 Greyfriars Kirkyard 53:04 Chambers St 57:32 South Bridge 01:01:40 Cockburn St 01:06:00 St Giles’ Cathedral 01:12:42 The Royal Mile – High St 01:18:25 The Royal Mile – Canongate 01:23:00 Thomson’s Land, The University of Edinburgh 01:26:10 Canongate Kirk 01:28:00 The Royal Mile – Canongate 01:33:55 Palace of Holyroodhouse 01:35:30 Scottish Parliament Building

Interview: “Time’s Witness” Author Rosemary Hill

In the 1740s the Scots were invading England and the wearing of tartan was banned. By the 1850s, Queen Victoria had built her Gothic fantasy in Aberdeenshire and tartan was everywhere. What happened in between?

In the second episode of her series on Romantic history, Rosemary Hill talks to Colin Kidd about the myths and traditions of Scottish history created in the 19th century, and the central role of Walter Scott in forging his country’s identity.

In the first episode of a new four-part series looking at the way history was transformed in the Romantic period, Rosemary Hill is joined by Tom Stammers to consider how an argument over the ‘improvement’ of Salisbury Cathedral in 1789 launched a new attitude to the past and its artefacts. Those sentiments were echoed in revolutionary France, where antiquarians risked the guillotine to preserve the monuments of the Ancien Régime.