Tag Archives: October 2022

City Views: A 360° Walking Tour Of Florence, Italy

Florence, Italian Firenze, is the capital of Firenze provincia (province) and Toscana (Tuscanyregione (region), central Italy. The city, located about 145 miles (230 km) northwest of Rome, is surrounded by gently rolling hills that are covered with villas and farms, vineyards, and orchards. Florence was founded as a Roman military colony about the 1st century BCE, and during its long history it has been a republic, a seat of the duchy of Tuscany, and a capital (1865–70) of Italy. During the 14th–16th century Florence achieved preeminence in commerce and finance, learning, and especially the arts.

Florence
Florence

The present glory of Florence is mainly its past. Indeed, its historic centre was inscribed on UNESCO’s World Heritage List in 1982. The buildings there are works of art abounding in yet more works of art, and the splendours of the city are stamped with the personalities of the individuals who made them. The geniuses of Florence were backed by persons of towering wealth, and the city to this day gives testimony to their passions for religion, for art, for power, or for money. Among the most famous of the city’s cultural giants are Leonardo da VinciMichelangeloDanteMachiavelliGalileo, and its most-renowned rulers, generations of the Medici family.

Filmed in October 2022

Books: The Top Ten Best Reviews Of October 2022


PHOTO: HARPER

Abominations: Selected Essays From a Career of Courting Self-Destruction

By Lionel Shriver Harper

With a restless imagination and an instinct to take on progressive orthodoxies, the novelist and essayist Lionel Shriver brings her “smart, plain-spoken and unpredictable” style to subjects that many writers prefer to shy away from. Review by Meghan Cox Gurdon.

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PHOTO: LIBRARY OF AMERICA

Bruce Catton: The Army of the Potomac Trilogy

Edited by Gary W. Gallagher Library of America

In a trilogy of narratives that “broke the mold” in Civil War history, Bruce Catton told the story of the Eastern theater with an eye to the sacrifices and sufferings of the ordinary soldiers who fought and died on both sides. Review by Harold Holzer.

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PHOTO: HARPER

The Escape Artist: The Man Who Broke Out of Auschwitz to Warn the World

By Jonathan Freedland Harper

Walter Rosenberg did not make it easy for the Nazi-allied regime in his native Slovakia to deport him—along with thousands of other Slovak Jews—to extermination camps like Auschwitz. But once he wound up there, he was determined to get out and spread the word of the ongoing genocide. Review by Diane Cole.

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PHOTO: KNOPF

The Extraordinary Life of an Ordinary Man

By Paul Newman Knopf

A long-awaited, posthumously published memoir from the star of “Cool Hand Luke,” “The Verdict” and other classics reveals the inner world of a hard-working actor who “breathed in insecurity and exhaled doubt.” Review by Michael O’Donnell.

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PHOTO: DOUBLEDAY

The Grandest Stage: A History of the World Series

By Tyler Kepner Doubleday

What was for many years the center of the American sports calendar has lost some of its grip on the collective imagination. But a journey through October Classics past proves that the magic of the World Series still has a potent charm. Review by David M. Shribman.

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PHOTO: KNOPF

Martha Graham: When Dance Became Modern

By Neil Baldwin Knopf

The pioneering figure of modern dance was a daring innovator, a technical perfectionist and a preternaturally gifted performer. While she transformed the way a generation of dancers thought about movement, she looked for ways to claim her art firmly as an American one. Review by Hamilton Cain.

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PHOTO: ABRAMS PRESS

The Oldest Cure in the World: Adventures in the Art and Science of Fasting

By Steve Hendricks Abrams Press

Fasting has a long history of use as a spiritual aid—a ritual of purification and turning away from indulgence—and as a tool for protest. But emerging science suggests that its positive effects on physical health can no longer be overlooked. Review by Matthew Rees.

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PHOTO: LIBRARY OF AMERICA

The Ray Bradbury Collection

Edited by Jonathan R. Eller Library of America

Ray Bradbury’s unique science fiction owed more to Nathaniel Hawthorne’s darkly symbolic stories than to H.G. Wells’s rationalist visions. On a Mars that held curious correspondences to the Midwestern country of Bradbury’s youth, fathers and sons negotiated the strange spaces between them. Review by Brad Leithauser.

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PHOTO: LITTLE, BROWN

The Revolutionary: Samuel Adams

By Stacy Schiff Little, Brown

The “stage manager” of the American Revolution has resisted attempts by historians to pin down the details of his life. Stacy Schiff finds a potential key to Samuel Adams’s enigmatic character in the financial tumult of his family’s business. Review by Mark G. Spencer.

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PHOTO: PANTHEON

The Sassoons: The Great Global Merchants and the Making of Empire

By Joseph Sassoon Pantheon

The business empire of the Sassoon dynasty began in Bombay, where the family of Iraqi Jews had fled to escape persecution, and flourished in the opium trade with China. The “Rothschilds of Asia” kept a low profile—and when the tides of fortune turned against them, their once-global enterprise became a distant memory. Review by Norman Lebrecht.

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Opinion & Analysis: A Low Price Bar For Britain, Risky Bidenomics, Iran’s Women

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Rishi Sunak’s promise of stability is a low bar for Britain, (10:35) the risks of Bidenomics and (18:20) will Iran’s women win? 

Front Page: The New York Times – October 31, 2022

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Senate Control Hinges on Neck-and-Neck Races, Times/Siena Poll Finds

The contests are close in Arizona, Georgia, Nevada and Pennsylvania. Many voters want Republicans to flip the Senate, but prefer the Democrat in their state.

Brazil Ejects Bolsonaro and Brings Back Former Leftist Leader Lula

Brazilians voted out their far-right leader, Jair Bolsonaro, after a single term and replaced him with former President Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva.

The Battle for Blue-Collar White Voters Raging in Biden’s Birthplace

Among white working-class voters in places like northeast Pennsylvania, the Democratic Party has both the furthest to fall and the most to gain.

Front Page: The New York Times – October 30, 2022

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Biden’s Agenda Hangs in the Balance if Republicans Take Congress

On a wide array of issues like abortion, taxes, race and judges, President Biden’s opportunities would shrink as Republicans vow to dismantle much of his legislative accomplishments.

At Least 151 Killed in Halloween Crowd Surge in Seoul

As many as 100,000 people were celebrating in a popular nightlife district in the center of the South Korean capital.

Russia Withdraws From Grain Deal After Drone Attack on Black Sea Fleet

The Russian move jeopardized a rare case of wartime coordination aimed at lowering global food prices and combating hunger.

Books: The New York Times Book Review – Oct 30, 2022

In Barbara Kingsolver’s New Novel, an Appalachian David Copperfield

“Demon Copperhead” reimagines Dickens’s story in a modern-day rural America contending with poverty and opioid addiction.

A Literary Caper Across the Dining Rooms of Belfast and New York

“The Lemon” is the satirical debut by a team of three authors writing under the pseudonym S.E. Boyd.

Emily Dickinson, at Home in Her ‘Full-Color Life’

The poet’s house museum in Amherst, Mass., gets a vibrant, historically correct makeover, underlining that she was not just a reclusive woman in white.

Cover Preview: Barron’s Magazine – Oct 31, 2022

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Election Day Is Almost Here. What’s at Stake for the Economy.

From tax legislation to the debt-ceiling debate, a lot is riding on the next Congress. What to expect from divided government.

The Dow Wallops the Nasdaq. It Doesn’t Happen Often, But Don’t Expect It to End Soon.

Playing the Reshoring Boom

Chinese Stocks Look Cheap. But Bargain Hunters Risk Losing Big.

Meta Could Fix This—But Don’t Get Your Hopes Up

3 Reasons Why the Gloomy Headlines on Housing Are Wrong

Don’t Expect a Big Rally, Even if GOP Wins Control of Congress

News: Midterm Election Campaign, House Speaker Pelosi Husband Assaulted

PBS NewsHour – New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the final days of the midterm campaign and the attack on House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s husband.

Front Page: The New York Times – October 29, 2022

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Elon Musk Starts Putting His Imprint on Twitter

The billionaire began as Twitter’s new owner by announcing a content moderation council and meeting employees, as some of the social media service’s users celebrated.

Elon Musk Takes Twitter, and Tech Deals, to Another Level

Silicon Valley moguls used to buy yachts and islands. Now they are rich enough, and perhaps arrogant enough, to acquire companies they fancy.

Inflation and Wages Continue to Climb Rapidly, in Bad News for the Fed

The Federal Reserve’s preferred inflation measure showed that price gains remained fast in September, and a gauge of wages it watches closely is climbing quickly.

Views: The New York Times Magazine – Oct 30, 2022

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Beyond Catastrophe – A New Climate Reality Is Coming Into View

There’s plenty of bad news. But thanks to real progress, we’re headed toward a less apocalyptic future.

The Try Guys and the Prison of Online Fame

This is what success looks like in the creator economy: Sometimes you have to beg millions of fans for mercy.