Tag Archives: Restaurants

New Destination Bars: “Fever-Tree Porch” Is In “Iconic Location” In NYC

From a Forbes.com online review:

A collection of mixed drinks at the new Fever-Tree Porch at Bryant ParkANTHONY DEEYINGExpect many of those chairs to be filled in the months ahead. The Winter Village is a huge draw, built around a massive ice rink enjoyed by upwards of 300,000 skaters throughout the holiday season. “We want people to enjoy great cocktails and drinks at the Porch, to take time to relax and appreciate the city with all its extraordinary energy,”

Earlier this month, cocktails started pouring at Fever-Tree Porch–a new, branded bar in Manhattan’s tree-lined Bryant Park. The year-long partnership marks the first of its kind between one of New York City’s premiere public spaces and the world’s top-selling purveyor of premium tonics and mixers. It also provides an al fresco outpost for some of the 12 million visitors making their way through the destination, annually. Given its prime location at the corner of 6th Avenue and 40th Street–one of the most trafficked sections in the country–the folks behind it are gearing up to serve as many as 75,000 cocktails over the course of the next 12 months.

To read more: https://www.forbes.com/sites/bradjaphe/2019/11/13/fever-tree-opens-its-first-ever-branded-bar-in-new-york-city/#56dae5434636

Food Reviews: Seven Reasons, Washington DC Is Top New Restaurant In U.S. (Esquire Magazine)

From an Esquire.com online article:

Seven Reasons Washington DC Restaurant…the Latin American food and cocktails at Seven Reasons—a mountain of black rice topped with prawns and pork cheeks, a salad in which the summery tang of tomatoes has been concentrated into cubes of jelly, a platter of hamachi tiradito whose pink and green splashes of salmon roe and jalapeño could hang in an art gallery—serve up jubilation as a remedy for pain and color as a cure for the blues. Is there almost too much packed into each bite? No one’s complaining. More-is-more extravagance is what makes Seven Reasons a fiesta you never want to stop.

Ten minutes north of the White House and its sour, divisive rhetoric, immigrants are throwing a party. Unfettered joy radiates from inside Seven Reasons as you stand outside the front door, and once you enter and sit down, that joy makes itself known—proudly, defiantly—in the riot of flavors and hues that chef Enrique Limardo sends out from the kitchen. Limardo and several members of his team come from Venezuela, a country in the midst of collapse…

To read more: https://www.esquire.com/food-drink/restaurants/a29728503/best-new-restaurants-in-america-2019/?source=nl&utm_source=nl_esq&utm_medium=email&date=111319&utm_campaign=nl18596123&src=nl

Restaurant Reviews: The “Pilar Cuban Eatery & Bakery” In Brooklyn – “Authentic Delicacies”

From a New Yorker online review:

Pilar Cuban EateryChief among these delicacies is Cuban lard bread, which is what inspired the opening of Pilar Cuban Bakery: Ricardo Barreras, the owner of Pilar Cuban Eatery, next door, decided to start baking it himself, using dough, shipped frozen, from a trusted supplier in Florida. When he realized that his kitchen wasn’t big enough for the operation, he figured he might as well open a second place.

On a recent morning in Bed-Stuy, a young boy pressed his face against the glass case at Pilar Cuban Bakery and began to moan. “Mom, Mom, Mooooom. I want this!” he declared plaintively, pointing to an enticingly glossy Key-lime pie, sliced into neat wedges. “And what about this?” he exclaimed, moving on to the coconut-chocolate bars.

To read more: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/11/11/the-auspicious-treats-of-pilar-cuban-bakery-and-win-son-bakery

Destination Restaurants: Newly Opened “Le Tre Rane” Inspired By Da Vinci Just Outside Of Florence

From a The Florentine magazine online review:

Le Tre Rane Ruffino RestaurantLegend has it that Le Tre Rane was the name of an inn that a young Leonardo da Vinci opened on Florence’s Ponte Vecchio, with a vision of a pioneering cooking style that would embody fine dining and healthy eating, while heightening the taste of being together.

Stefano Frassineti has taken the helm in the kitchen at Le Tre Rane. Born in Chianti and a career cook for almost 30 years, Stefano believes in dishes based on tradition that evolve into an unmistakable identity. He takes an orchestra of seasonal ingredients from personally sourced Tuscan suppliers and conducts them with endless curiosity and creativity. Eight seasonal menus will rotate year round—the current one is centred around freshly pressed extra-virgin olive oil—in addition to an à la carte menu featuring Tuscan meat (and the occasional fish) courses. Start with a delicate ricotta and chard pie, continue with hunter’s chicken tortelli and opt for a beef tagliata or bistecca alla Fiorentina.

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To read more: https://www.theflorentine.net/food-wine/2019/10/tre-rane-restaurant-ruffino/?mc_cid=e3c3fdbb7f&mc_eid=69f70995d1

Future Of Dining: Door Dash Kitchens Launches First “Ghost Restaurant” In Redwood City, CA

From a The Spoon online article:

DoorDash Kitchens deliveryDoorDash customers can now order from a handful of chain restaurants and either pick up food right at the commissary or have it delivered. This first location of DoorDash Kitchens, located in Redwood City, CA, will serve several cities in the California Peninsula area, including Menlo Park, Palo Alto, and Woodside, among others.

With more and more restaurants, food entrepreneurs, and delivery services using ghost kitchens, it seemed only a matter of time before DoorDash built one of its own. So it’s not too surprising that today, the San Francisco-based company announced the launch of its first ever shared commissary kitchen, dubbed DoorDash Kitchens, which will house multiple to-go restaurant concepts under a single roof, according to an email sent to The Spoon.

To read more: https://thespoon.tech/doordash-launches-its-first-ghost-kitchen-facility-for-to-go-restaurant-concepts/?ct=t(RSS_EMAIL_CAMPAIGN)&mc_cid=96085808f3&mc_eid=15aca53f83

Top Restaurants: “Miss Ada” Is “Mediterranean With A Twist” (Brooklyn, NY)

From a New Yorker online review:

Miss Ada Brooklyn RestaurantThe tantalizing combination of brown butter and fried sage may have its origin in Italy, but it turns out to work just as well with pita as it does with pasta. At Miss Ada, a restaurant in Fort Greene, it gets spooned, nutty and fragrant, over a sweet but earthy carrot hummus, and again over a bowl of fluffy whipped ricotta. The pita—warm, puffy, chewy—goes perfectly, too, with a rich, stretchy stracciatella cheese, its milky surface marbled with little golden ponds of olive oil and topped with, depending on the season, heirloom tomatoes, basil, cucumbers, and red onion, or snap peas, blood orange, ground-cherries, and kumquat.

“Mediterranean with a twist” is how the restaurant describes its food. The chef and owner, Tomer Blechman (late of Bar Bolonat, Gramercy Tavern, and Maialino), is originally from Israel, and the menu is rooted in the traditions and flavor profiles of the Middle East. Sometimes the twist is Italian, sometimes it’s Mexican—the sauce beneath the short-rib skewer is described as “Israeli mole” (made with Middle Eastern spices, chocolate, and harissa), and the Dead Sea #2 cocktail (guava, mezcal, mint, lime) is basically an Israeli margarita—and sometimes the za’atar-crusted salmon is accompanied by Japanese eggplant.

To read more: https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2019/10/21/miss-ada-and-goldas-modern-spins-on-middle-eastern-cooking

Art Of The Cocktail: How To Make Musso & Frank’s “Legendary Martini”

From a Los Angeles Magazine online article:

Musso and Franks Legendary Martini“The most important thing that we do is we never shake the martini. James Bond had it all wrong,” says Scuto. Shaking it incorporates too much ice, making for a watery drink, and, if it’s a gin martini, it potentially bruises the delicate aromatics. Instead, the drink is stirred roughly 12 times—bartenders use careful discretion—with ice, which is made with filtered water and a top-of-the-line Japanese Hoshizaki ice machine. The liquor is then carefully strained into a glass. It’s “all in the hand of the masters,” says Scuto.

Perhaps more than any other cocktail, a perfect martini demands a perfect venue. It’s not for drinking on beaches or cafè patios; it’s too easy to spill if you’re not sitting down; and it should be consumed somewhere with history and grit and texture. In short, it’s best at Musso & Frank Grill. This fall the storied Hollywood steakhouse celebrates its 100th anniversary and, with it, hundreds of thousands of servings of the classic cocktail. “The whole room, the whole setup, really, makes our martini special,” says Andrea Scuto, the restaurant’s general manager and beverage director. Here, Scuto shares just what goes into Musso & Frank’s signature cocktail.

To read more: https://www.lamag.com/article/musso-frank-martini/?utm_campaign=Food%20News&utm_source=hs_email&utm_medium=email&utm_content=77888263&_hsenc=p2ANqtz–SiksvfxDxU5VRkqIAkrguE4gnlSqHs5BhJz-5Z7u26rd_POHEVtseT-UhTlR4H3d8FFNS_tXSsGSiD8-s3w0XVlUTNg&_hsmi=77888263