Maine Views: An Aerial Tour Of Kennebunkport

With a rich history in agriculture and shipbuilding, Kennebunk today retains her connection to the land and sea. With easy access to the ocean, river, and wooded trails, the town is one of those special communities that seems to have it all, even the prestige of name (there is only one Kennebunk in the country).

Kennebunk balances a rural feel with true convenience – Portland is only 25 miles away and catching the Downeaster train in Wells makes the commute to Boston a snap. Featured on the town seal is the Lafayette Elm, which was planted to commemorate General Lafayette’s 1825 visit to Kennebunk. The handsome tree is one of the only survivors of the Dutch Elm that destroyed hundreds of trees that once lined Kennebunk’s streets.

The residents are a bit like the mighty tree: able to withstand the changing of seasons and passing of time with a sense of quiet nobility. In this tight-knit, laid-back community, it’s easy to be a good and helpful neighbor.

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Oct 14, 2022

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How SARS-CoV-2 battles our immune system

Meet the protein arsenal wielded by the pandemic virus

Evidence backs natural origin for pandemic, report asserts

Authors were dropped from broader Lancet review

A viral arsenal

SARS-CoV-2 wields versatile proteins to foil our immune system’s counterattack

Hydrogen power gets a boost

A fuel cell gains more power from ion-conducting, porous covalent organic frameworks

Views: American Scientist Magazine – Nov/Dec 2022

Current Issue

Ukrainian Scientists and Educators in Wartime

Following Russia’s invasion on February 24, the lives of scientists in Ukraine, like those of everyone else in the country, were upended. Russia has targeted educational and research institutions, destroying 285 buildings and damaging 2,528, according to the Ministry of Education and Science of Ukraine.

The Art of Turbulence

Despite enormous efforts, physicists are still struggling to create a complete theory of turbulent flows. Perhaps they need a change of perspective.

The Push and Pull of Friction

Forces involved in everyday activities become so familiar that we overlook how complicated they can be.

Shakespeare & Company: Author William Boyd On His Book ‘The Romantic’

Soldier. Farmer. Felon. Writer. Father. Lover.
One man, many lives.

Born in 1799, Cashel Greville Ross experiences myriad lives: joyous and devastating, years of luck and unexpected loss. Moving from County Cork to London, from Waterloo to Zanzibar, Cashel seeks his fortune across continents in war and in peace. He faces a terrible moral choice in a village in Sri Lanka as part of the East Indian Army. He enters the world of the Romantic Poets in Pisa. In Ravenna he meets a woman who will live in his heart for the rest of his days. As he travels the world as a soldier, a farmer, a felon, a writer, a father, a lover, he experiences all the vicissitudes of life and, through the accelerating turbulence of the nineteenth century, he discovers who he truly is. This is the romance of life itself, and the beating heart of The Romantic.

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Walks: The Iguazú Falls In Northern Argentina (4K)

This is a walk in Iguazu Falls, in the province of Misiones in Northern Argentina. This video was recorded in the Devil’s throat.

The Iguazu National Park consists of two national parks, one in Foz de Iguazu (Brazil) and the other one in Puerto Iguazu (Argentina). The curious thing is that although one only sees the falls as the main attraction, the park has a size of 252,982 hectares (67,720 on the Argentine side and 185,262 on the Brazilian side).

These falls in Argentina and Brazil managed to attract so much attention that almost at the same time they were declared National Parks (1934 in Argentina and 1939 in Brazil). And after some years and millions of visitors fascinated by the landscape and the sound of this natural attraction, UNESCO declared them as World Heritage Site in 1984, and reaffirmed as Exceptional Universal Value (their cultural and nature it’s so important that it’s conservation should be of worldwide interest) in 2013.

Hurricanes: Why Storm Surge Can Be So Deadly

Storm surge is the deadliest part of a hurricane. Discover what causes this effect, and which regions are most at risk.

Storm surge is produced by water being pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds moving cyclonically around the storm. The impact on surge of the low pressure associated with intense storms is minimal in comparison to the water being forced toward the shore by the wind.
Wind and Pressure Components of Hurricane Storm Surge

The maximum potential storm surge for a particular location depends on a number of different factors. Storm surge is a very complex phenomenon because it is sensitive to the slightest changes in storm intensity, forward speed, size (radius of maximum winds-RMW), angle of approach to the coast, central pressure (minimal contribution in comparison to the wind), and the shape and characteristics of coastal features such as bays and estuaries.

Health: Nature Medicine Magazine – October 2022

Volume 28 Issue 10

Association of step counts over time with the risk of chronic disease in the All of Us Research Program

Using electronic health records data from the All of Us Research Program, we show that higher daily step counts in data collected over several years of Fitbit fitness tracker use were associated with lower risk of common, chronic diseases, including diabetes, hypertension, gastroesophageal reflux disease, depression, obesity and sleep apnea.

Meat, vegetables and health — interpreting the evidence

Although questions remain about several diet and disease associations, current evidence supports dietary guidelines to limit red meat and increase vegetable intake.

CRISPR–Cas9 hits its target in amyloidosis

Nature Medicine explores the latest translational and clinical research news, with an analysis of Intellia and Regeneron’s gene-editing treatment, which reduced levels of transthyretin in patients.

Nature Medicine Website

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Oct 15, 2022

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The Communist Party’s obsession with control will make China weaker but more dangerous

Its five-yearly congress will further tighten one man’s grip

It will be an orderly affair. From October 16th the grandees of China’s Communist Party will gather in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing for their five-yearly congress. Not a teacup will be out of place; not a whisper of protest will be audible. The Communist Party has always been obsessed with control. But under President Xi Jinping that obsession has deepened. After three decades of opening and reform under previous leaders, China has in many ways become more closed and autocratic under Mr Xi. Surveillance has broadened. Censorship has stiffened. Party cells flex their muscles in private firms. Preserving the party’s grip on power trumps any other consideration.

News: January 6 Hearings, FBI Search Of Mar-a-Lago, Venezuela Migrants In U.S.

New evidence, witnesses and insight into Trump’s actions on Jan. 6. More details on why FBI searched Mar-a-Lago. White House expel illegal Venezuelan migrants as it offers some a legal path to entry.

Fall 2022: ‘Rejuvenating The Aging Brain’ – Scripps Research Magazine Cover

REJUVENATING THE AGING BRAIN

As humans live longer, they’re at increased risk of developing devastating NEURODEGENERATIVE diseases, such as Alzheimer’s—in a treatment landscape with few options and little hope. At Scripps Research, scientists are closer than ever to understanding how these diseases harm the brain and identifying possible drugs to stop them.

“This early preclinical work may identify proteins that protect against cognitive loss. We know it’s a long path to get to a drug, but we’re creating the foundation. We know there’s an entire landscape of potential molecular interactions that maintain healthy synapses, and any of these proteins could be a drug target.”— Hollis Cline, PhD

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