Tag Archives: Great Britain

Morning News: UK Energy Transition, Interest Rates & Inflation, Lego’s Rise

A.M. Edition for Oct. 6. WSJ’s Rochelle Toplensky explains what went wrong in Britain’s energy transition and what other countries can learn from this. The Senate prepares another vote on raising the U.S. debt limit. 

New Zealand raises interest rates as more central banks worry about rising inflation. Hundreds more join the oil spill cleanup in California. Plus, how the world’s biggest toy maker, Lego, stayed popular during the pandemic. Peter Granitz hosts.

Morning News: Supreme Court Docket, Britain’s Dying Trees, Hotels & Film

The court will be tackling just about every judicial and social flashpoint in the country during the term that starts today; our correspondent lays out the considerable stakes.

A vast and costly die-off of Britain’s trees could have been averted simply and cheaply: just let them stay put. And why hotels are such ideal backdrops for filmmakers and scriptwriters.

Reviews: Global Jihad, Fundamental Physics, Britain’s Pheasant Revolt

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, after Afghanistan, where next for global jihad?, Why Fundamental physics is humanity’s most extraordinary achievement (9:33) And pheasants revolt in Britain (14:51)

Views: The Wild Coastlines Of Britain And Ireland

The spectacular coastlines of Britain and Ireland get battered by weather in autumn and winter, but on a fine day in spring or summer they’re the equal of anything in the world.

Rosie Paterson, August 20, 2021

The west coast of Ireland bears the brunt of some of the Atlantic Ocean’s most terrific swells. As a result, its beaches are a Mecca for surfers. Lahinch — a mile-long, sandy crescent — is regarded as one of the best. And remember your golf clubs: the links course at Lahinch is a joy, one of the finest in the country.

On a sunny day, Luskentyre beach could easily be mistaken for somewhere in the Caribbean — something that could be said of all the best beaches in Scotland. The sand is a brilliant sugar-white sweep and the sea a vivid shade of blue. Sand dunes to the north provide protection on windier days and there are excellent walking trails for those who don’t fancy a dip. If bad weather sweeps in, you’ll certainly feel ready for a dram afterwards.

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English Countryside: Peak District National Park

The air in the Peak District feels different. It’s softer; thicker even — one friend compared it to ‘butter’ (a good thing, I think) — and certainly cleaner than any air in London. Maybe it was the feeling of freedom: it was the farthest any of us had travelled in months, following months of respective lockdowns in the capital and in Devon (where the air is lighter, and salty). 

We had few expectations. Several people had said that the Peaks couldn’t compare to the Lake District (spoiler alert, they are wrong and have likely never been), several more couldn’t even point them out on a map. But change is afoot and the Peaks look set to become one of the UK’s most popular destinations with the arrival of several new, exciting hotels. Buxton Crescent Hotel (Buxton of bottled water fame) opened last year; The Tawny — a collection of rooms, tree- and boathouses — and Wildhive Callow Hall join it this summer. 

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Channel Island Views: Monuments Of Jersey

Famous for its Jersey Royals, honey-coloured cows and international finance industry, Jersey is perhaps less well known for its rich history and distinct culture. Evidence of human activity dates back 250,000 years (the caves at La Cotte de St Brelade are associated with mammoth hunting) and its more recent Norman links give it a very French feel.

Country Life, July 17, 2021

Electric bikes, available to rent, are an ideal way to explore the landscape, as you look out for a glimpse of a bottle-nosed dolphin, red squirrel or puffin, or you could simply take to your feet to stroll around the island and drink in the magnificent views.

Read and see more at Country Life Magazine

Views: British Steam Yacht Gondola In Lake District

Set sail over Coniston Water with the National Trust in this behind-the-scenes video of Steam Yacht Gondola, one of the only steam-running gondolas remaining in the Lake District. In this video, find out about the work that goes into every voyage, and hear the stories of the gondola from the boat’s Manager, Julian. He’ll show you how he stokes the fire and what he and the team do to prepare the gondola before setting out for a journey. You’ll also hear about the traditional methods that are still used to this day to dock the boat. The history of Steam Yacht Gondola reaches as far back as the Victorian period, and to step aboard is to step back in time. Sir James Ramsden, Director of the Furness Railway Company, saw an opportunity to bring a pleasure cruise to Coniston Water after being inspired by a trip to Venice in 1850. Out of his vision, Steam Yacht Gondola was borne.

Morning News: U.S. Fuels World Economy, Crypto Closure, Venmo Change

A.M. Edition for June 28. WSJ’s Tom Fairless discusses the U.S. presence in the worldwide economic movement. Crypto exchange Binance is ordered to cease U.K. activities.

WSJ markets columnist Mike Bird on stock and commodity growth. And, Venmo makes a change. Marc Stewart hosts.