Medicine: Why Long Covid Is Still Not Understood

Even mild COVID-19 is at least correlated with a startlingly wide spectrum of seemingly every illness. We need a much better taxonomy to address people’s suffering.

Long Covid – Whole Body Symptoms

From The Atlantic, October 5, 2022:

The cases of long covid that turn up in news reports, the medical literature, and in the offices of doctors like me fall into a few rough (and sometimes overlapping) categories. The first seems most readily explainable: the combination of organ damage, often profound physical debilitation, and poor mental health inflicted by severe pneumonia and resultant critical illness.

This serious long-term COVID-19 complication gets relatively little media attention despite its severity. The coronavirus can cause acute respiratory distress syndrome, the gravest form of pneumonia, which can in turn provoke a spiral of inflammation and injury that can end up taking down virtually every organ. I have seen many such complications in the ICU: failing hearts, collapsed lungs, failed kidneys, brain hemorrhages, limbs cut off from blood flow, and more. More than 7 million COVID-19 hospitalizations occurred in the United States before the Omicron wave, suggesting that millions could be left with damaged lungs or complications of critical illness. Whether these patients’ needs for care and rehabilitation are being adequately (and equitably) met is unclear: Ensuring that they are is an urgent priority.

Read full article at The Atlantic

Preview: New Scientist Magazine – Oct 8, 2022

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  • CULTURE – Nuclear review: Oliver Stone’s paean to a nuclear future
  • FEATURES – Why ancient Nubia is finally emerging from Egypt’s long shadow
  • FEATURES – Did magnetism shape the universe? An epic experiment suggests it did
  • FEATURES – How hacking your metabolism can help you burn fat and prevent disease

Cinematic Short Films: Bordeaux & Saint Emilion

Filmed and edited by: Matteo Bertoli

Bordeaux, city and port, capital of Gironde départementNouvelle-Aquitaine région, southwestern France. It lies along the Garonne River 15 miles (24 km) above its junction with the Dordogne and 60 miles (96 km) from its mouth, in a plain east of the wine-growing district of Médoc.

The dry soil of Médoc attracted settlement as early as the Bronze Age; and, at least since Roman times, Bordeaux has been a flourishing town and port, with connections particularly with Spain and Britain. As Burdigala, it was the chief town of the Bituriges Vivisci, a Celtic people. Under the Romans it was the capital of the province of Aquitania, which extended from the Pyrenees to the Loire. In the 4th century Burdigala, then the capital of Aquitania Secunda (one of the three parts into which the emperor Diocletian had divided Aquitania), was described by the writer Ausonius, a native of the city, as a square, walled town and one of the great educational centres of Gaul. During the decline of the Roman Empire, the region around Bordeaux entered a period of political instability from which it recovered only when the dukes of Aquitaine established themselves early in the 10th century.

New Books: ‘What To Read’ The New York Times (Oct 5)

Oct. 5, 2022

IN A TIME OF PANTHERS: Early Photographs, by Jeffrey Henson Scales. (SPQR Editions, $49.95.) Scales, a photography editor at The Times, has dug up intimate images taken of Black Panther members and protests during the late 1960s to share a “time capsule” that has taken on new urgency for the author and for our country at large.

CAROLEE SCHNEEMANN: Body Politics, edited by Lotte Johnson and Chris Bayley. (Yale University, $50.) This collection gathers six decades of work from the late experimental artist, including paintings, multimedia installations and films, to shed new light on Schneemann’s ideas about the body, war and more.

IN THE BLACK FANTASTIC, by Ekow Eshun. (MIT, $39.95.) In this exciting, wide-ranging collection, Eshun presents speculative art and imagery from the African diaspora with a focus on folklore and Afrofuturism and explores works such as the paintings of Kara Walker and Chris Ofili and Jordan Peele’s “Get Out.”

FIELD OF PLAY: 60 Years of NFL Photography, by Steve Cassady and Michael Zagaris. (Abrams, $80.) Zagaris’s images — covering 42 Super Bowls, 49 seasons with the San Francisco 49ers and more — provide glimpses into moments of tension, pain and intensity over 60 years of N.F.L. history.

Preview: Iceland Review Magazine – Oct/Nov 2022

Cover of Iceland Review, issue 5 2022

ICELAND REVIEW – October / November 2022

In Harm’s Way

Gréta Sigríður Einarsdóttir  October 5, 2022

What can you tell me about North Iceland?

Erik Pomrenke  September 20, 2022

When and where are the September sheep roundups scheduled?

Erik Pomrenke  September 13, 2022

Travel: Exploring The City Of Prague, Czech Republic

Prague is one of the most-visited cities in Europe. Before the coronavirus pandemic, overtourism was a real problem here: It was often so crowded that it was almost impossible to move around the historic Old Town, as well as around Charles Bridge, Hradcany Castle Hill, and Wenceslas Square.

What’s it like today, after the pandemic, and what ideas are there for tourism in Prague in the future? DW’s Nicole Frölich visited the Czech capital, and was surprised at what she discovered. Have you ever been to Prague?

Prague, capital city of the Czech Republic, is bisected by the Vltava River. Nicknamed “the City of a Hundred Spires,” it’s known for its Old Town Square, the heart of its historic core, with colorful baroque buildings, Gothic churches and the medieval Astronomical Clock, which gives an animated hourly show. Completed in 1402, pedestrian Charles Bridge is lined with statues of Catholic saints.

Scotland Views: The Beltie Burn – A River Restored

The Easter Beltie Restoration project returned a straightened agricultural stream to a natural meandering course, to improve habitats for nature and boost climate resilience.

The project was the only one of its kind in the north east of Scotland, and has created a new, two-kilometre stretch of meandering river corridor flowing through ten hectares of floodplain, rich in habitats where nature can thrive.

The Beltie Burn is a burn in Aberdeenshire, Scotland, which below Torphins and Glassel is known as the Burn of Canny. It begins in the hill of Benaquhallie, and flows for 25 km south-east through Torphins before joining the River Dee about 4 kilometres west of Banchory.

Previews: Country Life Magazine – Oct 5, 2022

The capital according to… Howard Jacobson tells Harry McKinley about the perfect bagel Trees for life. On the 50th anniversary of the Woodland Trust, Clive Aslet visits the Devon home of its farsighted founder, Ken Watkins. Speaking truth to power, British politicians have been at the mercy of cartoonists for centuries, finds Charles Harris.


Country Life Preview 60

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Paris Exhibitions: ‘Claude Monet – Joan Mitchell’

The exhibitions “Monet – Mitchell” create an unprecendented “dialogue” between the works of two exceptional artists, Claude Monet (1840-1926) and Joan Mitchell (1925-1992).

“The dialogue Claude Monet – Joan Mitchell” will be introduce by the “Joan Mitchell Retrospective”, enabling the public in France and Europe to discover her work.

The “Monet – Mitchell” exhibitions present each artist’s unique response to a shared landscape, which they illustrate in a particularly immersive and sensual manner. In his last paintings, the Water Lilies, Monet aimed to recreate in his studio the motifs he observed at length on the surface of his water lily pond in Giverny. Joan Mitchell, on the other hand, would explore a memory or a sense of the emotions she felt while in a particular place that was dear to her, perceptions that remained vivid beyond space and time. She would create these abstract compositions at La Tour, her studio in Vétheuil, a small French village.

Read and see more

MONET – MITCHELL

Exhibition – 05.10.2022 to 27.02.2023

Autumn 2022 Views: The Lake District, Cumbria, UK

The Lake District is a region and national park in Cumbria in northwest England. A popular vacation destination, it’s known for its glacial ribbon lakes, rugged fell mountains and historic literary associations. Market towns such as Kendal, Ambleside and Keswick on scenic Derwentwater are bases for exploring the area and home to traditional inns, galleries of local art and outdoor equipment shops. 

Brougham castle, Ullswater, Buttermere, Honister Pass, Wast Water.