Tag Archives: Travel Guides

Travel Guide: What Most Tourists Like About Berlin

What to do in Berlin? Fine dining or doner kebab? Strolling around or a guided tour? Visiting museums or famous landmarks? We show you what tourists love most in the German capital of Berlin! Have you ever been to Berlin?

Berlin, Germany’s capital, dates to the 13th century. Reminders of the city’s turbulent 20th-century history include its Holocaust memorial and the Berlin Wall’s graffitied remains. Divided during the Cold War, its 18th-century Brandenburg Gate has become a symbol of reunification. The city’s also known for its art scene and modern landmarks like the gold-colored, swoop-roofed Berliner Philharmonie, built in 1963.

City Guide: Top Things To Do In Vilnius, Lithuania

This is not for people with a fear of heights: Join DW reporter Axel Primavesi on the observation deck of the Vilnius TV tower! But before Axel looks down from a height of 170 meters onto the capital of Lithuania, he will introduce you to Cathedral Square and a typical Lithuanian specialty, Šaltibarščiai.

Travel Guides: Culture & Food In Montreal, Canada

Attaché – Our Montreal travel guide! What a place. It really feels like Montreal shouldn’t exist, it’s such a strange confluence of cultures. But I am so glad it does. And I finally got to experience my Montreal food unicorn – poutine. Glorious, wonderful, Montreal poutine. Absolutely worth waiting 43 years for! Montreal, you have my heart…despite the clogged arteries.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Intro 01:07 – Transport 04:33 – Sponsor 06:01 – Food 10:39 – Money

Travel In Denmark: Three Top Spots In Copenhagen

Instagram is full of colorful pictures of Copenhagen. But what does the Danish capital really look like? We checked out three of the most popular spots – we went to see the old harbor Nyhavn, strolled around the 16th century Rosenberg Castle and had a blast at the famous Tivoli amusement park.

Copenhagen, Denmark’s capital, sits on the coastal islands of Zealand and Amager. It’s linked to Malmo in southern Sweden by the Öresund Bridge. Indre By, the city’s historic center, contains Frederiksstaden, an 18th-century rococo district, home to the royal family’s Amalienborg Palace. Nearby is Christiansborg Palace and the Renaissance-era Rosenborg Castle, surrounded by gardens and home to the crown jewels. 

Travel Guides: Summer & Winter In Lake Tahoe (4K)

Lake Tahoe is a large freshwater lake in the Sierra Nevada Mountains, straddling the border of California and Nevada. It’s known for its beaches and ski resorts.

Video timeline: South Lake Tahoe(4:45), Emerald Bay(16:25), Meeks Bay(18:15), Homewood(19:10), Tahoe City(19:43), Truckee(20:29), Tahoe Vista(21:48), Kings Beach(22:12), Crystal Bay, NV(23:22), Incline Village(24:01), Sand Harbor(26:23)

On the southwest shore, Emerald Bay State Park contains the 1929 Nordic-style mansion Vikingsholm. Along the lake’s northeast side, Lake Tahoe Nevada State Park includes Sand Harbor Beach and Spooner Lake, a gateway to the long-distance Tahoe Rim Trail.

Travel Guide: The Top 25 Places To Visit In Portugal

The most beautiful places to visit in Portugal:

0:00 – Intro 0:31 – Ursa Beach & Cabo da Roca 1:30 – Pena Palace 2:11 – Castle of the Moors 2:44 – Lisbon 3:24 – Òbidos 4:27 – Nazaré 5:13 – Berlengas Islands 5:53 – Tomar 6:17 – Castle of Leiria 6:37 – Coimbra 7:16 – Serra da Estrela 7:47 – Azores – (São Miguel & Pico Island) 8:48 – Algarve Coast & Lagos 9:18 – Bengali Cave & Ponta da Piedade 9:36 – Porto & Duoro Valley 10:20 – Peneda-Gerês National Park 10:52 – Guimarães 11:28 – Madeira 11:27 – Ponta do Sol 12:24 – Fanal Forest 13:05 – São Vincente Church 13:24 – Pico do Ariero 14:38 – Outro

Swiss Views: The Streets And Sights Of Neuchâtel

Neuchâtel (Neuenburg) is considered to be one of Switzerland most beautiful cities. It lays in the French speaking part of Switzerland and enchants with its visitors with its happy vibes. The city is very vibrant, many people love to stroll through the various streets and alleys, do shopping or go for sightseeing.

The city is full of limestone houses, which are very characteristic for Neuchâtel, rendering this city very distinct from the others of Switzerland. A must-see are the castle and the church on the hill in the middle of the city. They are considered historic landmarks from the days when Neuchâtel still followed a royal system being under French or Prussian rule. The church’s interior is very beautiful, especially with the ceiling. Neuchâtel has a beautiful lake promenade. Point of interest are Beau Rivage and the docks with the many boats.

During Summer you even can go for swimming. Neuchâtel is best to be reached by train, although arrival by car is possible. The train station is about 15 minutes from the city centre by walk, but you may take a shortcut by bus. Neuchâtel and the entire canton are great for cheap vacations as they have some attractive budget travelers offers. If you stay in any hotel in the canton, you get a booklet full of vouchers that provide you free public transportation and entry to the museums during the date of validity. It is valid for 1 day if you stay for 1 night, otherwise as many days as nights that you booked. All in all, Neuchâtel is a wonderful Swiss city, underrated but among the most beautiful ones!

Scotland Views: What To See And Do In Glasgow

DW reporter Hannah travelled to her home country of Scotland to give you her bucketlist of everything you need to check out in the city of Glasgow! When you think of Glasgow, the first thing that comes to mind is probably cold and rainy weather. But despite that, Scotland’s largest city is a vibrant, cultural hub. It’s a UNESCO City of Music, and has one of the best live music scenes in the UK. Which of Hannah’s travel tips is your favourite – the museum, the deep-fried Mars bar or the music scene?

Glasgow is a port city on the River Clyde in Scotland’s western Lowlands. It’s famed for its Victorian and art nouveau architecture, a rich legacy of the city’s 18th–20th-century prosperity due to trade and shipbuilding. Today it’s a national cultural hub, home to institutions including the Scottish Opera, Scottish Ballet and National Theatre of Scotland, as well as acclaimed museums and a thriving music scene.

Travel Guide: 36 Hours In New York City (Fall 2022)

36 HOURS – New York City

By Becky Hughes Photographs by Karsten Moran 

Friday – 3:30 p.m. Get a bird’s eye view of the city

Pack in 400 years of history at the Museum of the City of New York in East Harlem ($20 suggested admission), opposite Central Park at the top end of Museum Mile. Its ongoing exhibition, “New York at Its Core,” will give you a glimpse of the neighborhoods you’ll encounter this weekend, and an overview of the many eras of the city’s development, including its few decades as the Dutch settlement of New Amsterdam, its 19th-century shift to an immigrant hub, the growth of the city’s park program after the New Deal and the birth of the punk and hip-hop subcultures of the 1970s and 1980s.

6 p.m. – Go grand in Midtown

To the dismay of the too-cool-for-school set, Midtown is having a moment. Rockefeller Center is enticing popular restaurateurs with real-estate deals, aiming to draw locals and tourists alike. One glamorous newcomer is Le Rock, a French brasserie (from the owners of the popular TriBeCa restaurant Frenchette) with a sleek Art Deco design and a pricey (around $200 for two without drinks) menu of chilled oysters ($24 for a half dozen), bison au poivre ($60) and a long list of natural wines. For a night of grand Manhattan opulence, you’re in good hands. Other notable arrivals in the area: Detroit-style slices at Ace’s Pizza, Italian dining with outdoor seating at Lodi (a Times food critic’s favorite) and the 11-seat Blue Ribbon Sushi Bar.

Saturday – 10 a.m. Have a morning nosh

The real breakfast of champions is a pastrami, egg and cheese sandwich ($12.50) at Frankel’s Delicatessen & Appetizing in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. There may be no better representation of New York deli cuisine than the happy marriage between the Jewish staple meat, and the bodega and coffee-cart hero, the bacon, egg and cheese. If securing a window seat is a bust, the benches of McCarren Park across the street are calling your name. And for breakfast dessert (you’re on vacation!): Peter Pan Donut & Pastry Shop. You might recognize the bakery from the 2021 movie “Spider-Man: No Way Home,” but regulars know it for the unparalleled blueberry buttermilk doughnuts ($1.75).

11 a.m. Shop by the skyline

From Greenpoint, the northernmost neighborhood in Brooklyn, the views of the East River are unbeatable. Follow Noble Street all the way to the end, and you’ll find Greenpoint Terminal Market, a marketplace of vendors, every Saturday and Sunday, rain or shine. You’ll get a top-tier view of the Manhattan skyline while you sift through racks of vintage clothes, tables of art and jewelry, and maybe get a really bad portrait made ($5) to commemorate the day. For a little more shopping, try Big Night, a “shop for dinner, parties and dinner parties”; Dobbin St. Vintage Co-op for vintage furniture; and the mini-Japanese market at 50 Norman for housewares by Cibone and customized dashi packs from Dashi Okume.

1:30 p.m. – Dive into NYC ephemera

Hidden away from Williamsburg’s chain coffee shops and boutique gyms is City Reliquary ($7 entry) a tiny, colorful storefront wedged between buildings on Metropolitan Avenue. Inside is a quirky and fascinating collection of New York artifacts curated by this not-for-profit community museum and civic organization. Packed (really packed) into two small rooms, you’ll find defunct subway signage, souvenirs from New York World’s Fairs, samples of rocks from far below the city and an astonishing amount more. Look for the many iterations of paper deli cups, including the iconic Anthora cup (designed by Leslie Buck in the 1960s), which you’ll still see at diners and bodegas today.

6 p.m. – Dine in the heart of the Village

Greenwich Village cynics will complain about its restaurants: Lines everywhere, many cash-only and littered with celebrities and the rubberneckers that follow. For first-time Village diners, though, Bar Pitti unfailingly delivers an entertaining night out. Get there around 6 p.m. (with cash — no cards accepted) and there should be a short wait. Order the eggplant Parmesan if it’s on the chalkboard of specials ($14.50), pappardelle in a pink cream sauce ($23.50) and a bottle of Lambrusco ($50). The best Italian food in New York? It’s probably not the best on its block. But the brash-yet-somehow-charming service, prime location and killer people-watching makes Bar Pitti a true New York affair. For a more relaxed alternative, Malatesta Trattoria has an excellent tagliatelle ragu ($17, cash-only) and a lower-key ambience.

To state the obvious: You can’t see New York City in 36 hours. You could easily fill a couple of days eating your way down one street in Jackson Heights, Queens, or spend an entire weekend uncovering corners of Central Park. This guide is not designed to check landmarks off a list, but rather to offer visitors one slice of life in New York (minus the laundry schlepping and skyrocketing rent). Below you’ll find a subterranean piano bar, a hidden garden, market shopping against the backdrop of an unbeatable skyline and some big-picture and hyperlocal history to bring you a little closer to feeling the gestalt of the city.

Read more at The New York Times