Category Archives: Analysis

Opinion: Xi Jinping Zero-Covid Policy, Activision Blizzard, UK Emigration

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Xi Jinping’s zero-covid policy, why trustbusters should let Microsoft buy Activision Blizzard (11:44) and why emigration is in the air for Britons (16:38).

Politics: Democrats Shift Primaries, Railroad Strike

PBS NewsHour (December 2, 2022) – New York Times columnist David Brooks and Washington Post associate editor Jonathan Capehart join Judy Woodruff to discuss the week in politics, including the Democrats’ plan to shakeup the road to the White House, President Biden and Congress halt a potential railroad strike and lawmakers shield gay marriage.

Analysis: How To Make Healthcare Affordable

The cost of health care is unaffordable for many in the developing world. But while universal health care may sound like an impossible dream, it’s more achievable than you might think.

Video timeline: 00:00 – The argument for universal health coverage is clear 00:57 – Thailand’s path to universal health coverage 03:31 – Universal health care around the world 04:48 – How to finance universal health coverage? 05:30 – Rwanda: from genocide to public health exemplar 07:19 – What is a pooling finance system? 08:01 – Which services make the cut? 11:17 – The economic benefits of UHC 12:23 – Could covid-19 be a catalyst for reform?

Analysis: Budweiser And The Death Of Cheap Beer

CNBC – Anheuser-Busch InBev is the world’s largest brewer with 500 brands in more than 100 countries. In 2016, Flemish Interbrew and Brazilian Ambev, together known as InBev, merged with the American legacy company Anheuser-Busch, which ultimately brought AB under the leadership of 3G Capital.

Chapters: 00:00 – Introduction 2:08 – Ch. 1: Becoming Anheuser-Busch 4:51 – Ch. 2: A consolidation game 9:20 – Ch. 3 – Going beyond beer

3G Capital is a Brazilian-American global investment firm whose tactics include an aggressive, and at times controversial, cost-cutting strategy. AB InBev’s longtime priority of aggressive acquisitions has been coupled with a focus on profit and price per barrel rather than volume share. Premiumization and expanding beyond beer continue to be winning strategies. In 2021, the company amassed $54.3 billion in revenue with 169,000 employees worldwide. As overall beer consumption has declined, AB InBev has transformed from merely a beer company to the largest beverage company in the world.

Analysis & Opinion: Energy Crisis Politics, Crypto To Zero, U.S. Organized Crime

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Europe’s crisis of energy and geopolitics, how crypto goes to zero (10:19) and the consequences of America’s success against organised crime (16:32).

Analysis: ‘Made In America’ Is Changing In 2022 (FT)

Financial Times – The FT’s global business columnist Rana Foroohar looks at why the US should bring manufacturing jobs back home. In the second of three films based on her new book, ‘Homecoming: the path to prosperity in a post-global world’, she follows the all-American supply chain of clothing company American Giant, to see how it impacts jobs, businesses and communities

Video timeline: 00:00 Made in America, Again 01:20 An all-American supply chain starts here 03:17 What went wrong with globalization? 07:00 The cotton gin – a risky business 09:53 Automation at a high-tech mill 13:16 Why manufacturing is important 19:59 The family-run finishing factory 23:21 Worker innovation at the sewing factory 27:33 Education, training and community 29:07 A moment for change?

Analysis & Opinion: Is It The End Of Crypto?, Indonesia Matters, A New Trumpist

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, is this the end of crypto? Also, why Indonesia matters (11:00) and Glenn Youngkin’s unique approach to Trumpism (19:40).

Politics: Trump Special Counsel, Congress In 2023

Washington Post columnists Jonathan Capehart and Gary Abernathy join Amna Nawaz to discuss the week in politics, including a special counsel appointed to investigate former President Trump, the balance of power in Washington and the battle for leadership on Capitol Hill.

Qatar 2022 World Cup: Why It Spent $300 Billion

The Economist – Qatar is about to host the most expensive World Cup ever, costing as much as $300bn. Why has this small, gas-rich kingdom chosen to host football’s most prestigious event, and how does it fit into its broader plans for economic transformation?

Video timeline: 00:00 – Why is Qatar hosting the World Cup? 00:57 – World Cups are expensive competitions 01:56 – Qatar’s human rights violations 02:36 – Qatar’s place in the Gulf 04:43 – Qatar distinguishes itself from its neighbours 05:50 – Qatar bids to host the World Cup 07:18 – Qatar’s neighbours issue a blockade 10:12 – What might happen after the World Cup?

Read our defence of Qatar’s hosting of the World Cup: https://econ.st/3XcOC5A

Analysis: The Future Of Energy Policies In Europe

DW Documentary – Energy is life – these days, Europeans are experiencing that first-hand. For far too long, Europe has depended on coal, oil and gas imports from around the world. Not only have these fuels been driving the climate catastrophe, but they also serve as a dangerous bargaining chip for geopolitical interests.

Energy is essential — and it is a major problem. The war in Ukraine has shown just how dependent Europe is on fossil fuels. This has weakened Europe and given export countries – frequently governed by authoritarian rule – a geopolitical means of leverage. Now, war on the European continent has eclipsed concerns over the climate Crisis. The increased consumption of harmful fuels is creating economic and political problems.

Yet, against the odds, decarbonizing Europe remains a widespread priority, and alternative solutions are already available. In France, Denmark and Ukraine, civil initiatives are taking energy supplies into their own hands and investing in the joint production of their own solar energy. In some cases, privately produced solar energy has proven much cheaper than what national solar energy providers offer.

These initiatives show that decentralizing energy production could be the key to transforming our energy supply. Poland still depends heavily on coal, but is offering re-training programs for employees in the mining business to help them transition to green jobs. An estimated one million such green jobs are expected to be created in Europe by 2030. Green hydrogen, currently still in the development stages, could be a sustainable and profitable alternative for industries in the future.

Across the continent, workable alternatives are emerging. The current quick succession of political crises has now joined the ongoing climate crisis to show just how important it is to act now.