Category Archives: Culinary Arts

Profiles: French Chef Hélène Darroze Of The Connaught in London

Eater – Three-Michelin-starred restaurant Hélène Darroze in London offers its tasting menu at lunch and dinner, meaning nearly all the day’s preparation must be done before noon. The staff at the restaurant prepare dishes like langoustine, grouse wellington, chef’s table octopus, and more.

French Cuisine: The Many Delights Of Normandy

One of the best things about France is its food. Each region has its own culinary wonders that reflect the area’s culture and history. Join Genie Godula and Florence Villeminot as they embark on a road trip to discover France’s regions through gastronomy.

Their first stop is Normandy. Known for its world-famous beaches and towering monuments – like the Mont-Saint-Michel – the region is also a foodie’s paradise. From the creamy delight that is Camembert to the apple brandy named Calvados, we take you to discover the region of Normandy through its culinary specialties.

International Reviews: Top Books On Food In 2022

NOVEMBER 23, 2022

BUDMO!: Recipes from a Ukrainian Kitchen

Preview thumbnail for 'BUDMO!: Recipes from a Ukrainian Kitchen

In this colorful  cookbook  you’ll find recipes for dishes like cold borscht, dark cherry varenyky and sweet pumpkin rice kasha from Ukrainian native Anna Voloshyna, who moved to California in 2011. Known for hosting pop-up dinners and cooking classes,  Voloshyna is also a food stylist, photographer and blogger. In her debut cookbook, she offers modern and American spins on the typical dishes she grew up with, and she also includes details like food origins, customs and traditions in each recipe’s headnote. Budmo, which is how Ukrainians say “cheers,” shares the country’s complicated history that has led up to the current war, while simultaneously celebrating its varied and vibrant cuisine.

A Waiter in Paris: Adventures in the Dark Heart of the City

Preview thumbnail for 'A Waiter in Paris: Adventures in the Dark Heart of the City

“It’s the boundary between two worlds: the Paris you see and the Paris you don’t,” writes Edward Chisholm, an Englishman who moved to Paris in 2012 and spent several years as a waiter while trying to build up his writing career. Now, his debut book, a no-holds-barred memoir detailing his time waiting tables in one of the world’s hottest restaurant cities, reveals what really goes on behind the scenes of fine dining establishments. This book is the next generation of Anthony Bourdain’s Kitchen Confidentialand Stephanie Danler’s Sweetbitter, with Chisholm exposing the often-shocking mayhem of the restaurant kitchen in visceral detail. He deftly uses the Parisian restaurant as a microcosm for France as a whole, with immigrants, people of color and blue-collar workers at the bottom of the food chain.

Sweet Land of Liberty: A History of America in 11 Pies

Preview thumbnail for 'Sweet Land of Liberty: A History of America in 11 Pies

Ever wonder how apple pie became a symbol of America? Food writer and editor Rossi Anastopoulo slices into the history of pie in the good ol’ US of A, from pumpkin pie on Thanksgiving to apple pie on Independence Day, using the iconic American dessert to tell the story of a country. Still, it’s not all sweet, as she details how molasses pie traces its origin to slavery and Jell-O pie reveals the history of gender disparity in our country. All in all, Anastopoulo shares interesting facts behind 11 all-American pies, like how the first recipe for American apple pie appeared in a 1796 cookbook called American Cookery, which is believed to be the first cookbook ever published in the newly minted United States. The book includes a recipe for each pie, too.

Diasporican: A Puerto Rican Cookbook

Preview thumbnail for 'Diasporican: A Puerto Rican Cookbook

Part memoir and part cookbook, this debut from our country’s first Puerto Rican food columnist Illyanna Maisonet dives into the author’s personal family recipes, which she painstakingly documented from her extended relatives through the years, and also includes her interpretation of dishes by Puerto Rican friends, chefs and roadside food vendors. There are 90 recipes including traditional Puerto Rican dishes like tostones, pernil and mofongo. Other highlights include sloppy joes and sancocho. But more than just the recipes, Maisonet shares how migration and colonization have influenced and progressed Puerto Rican food, ingredients and techniques. In explaining why her family wraps their pasteles in foil, Maisonet writes in her intimate, conversational style, “When you think of my grandma coming to Sacramento as a 17-year-old mother of two in 1956, you have to wonder where the hell would she have found banana leaves in Northern California?” She posits that this progression is no less authentic than the original method, and that the resourcefulness of Puerto Ricans has evolved their cuisine into what it is today: dynamic and delicious.

READ MORE

Culinary Reviews: ‘The Big Texas Cookbook’ (2022)

“CBS Saturday Morning” co-host Jeff Glor takes a trip to Texas to try recipes featured within “The Big Texas Cookbook.”

The editors of Texas Monthly celebrate the ever-evolving culinary landscape of the Lone Star State in this stunning cookbook, featuring more than 100 recipes, gorgeous color photos, and insightful essays.

The Big Texas Cookbook

When it comes to food, Texas may be best known for its beloved barbecue and tacos. But at more than 29 million people, the state is one of the most culturally diverse in America—and so is its culinary scene. From the kolaches introduced by Czechs settlers to the Hill Country in the 1800s to the Viet-Cajun crawfish that Vietnamese immigrants blessed Houston with in the early 2000s, the tastes on offer here are as vast and varied as the 268,596 square miles of earth they spring from.

In The Big Texas Cookbook, the editors of the award-winning magazine Texas Monthly have gathered an expansive collection of recipes that reflects the state’s food traditions, eclectically grouped by how Texans like to start and end the day (Rise and Shine, There Stands the Glass), how they revere their native-born ingredients (Made in Texas), and how they love the people, places, and rituals that surround their favorite meals (On Holiday, Home Plates). Getting their very own chapters—no surprise—are the behemoths mentioned above, barbecue and Tex-Mex (Smoke Signals, Con Todo). With recipes for über-regional specialties like venison parisa, home cooking favorites like King Ranch casserole, and contemporary riffs like a remarkable Lao beef chili, The Big Texas Cookbook pays homage to the cooks who long ago shaped the state’s food culture and the ones who are building on those traditions in surprising and delightful ways.

Packed with atmospheric photos, illustrations, and essays, The Big Texas Cookbook is a vivid culinary portrait of the land, its people, and its past, present, and future.

Read a Sample

Michelin Guide: A Tour Of Restaurants In Estonia

MICHELIN Guide – The MICHELIN Guide makes you travel to Estonia to discover the treasures of this country and their products. Following the launch of the first MICHELIN Guide Estonia in May 2022, we take a closer look at this popular Baltic region.

We hear from several of the forward-thinking chefs whose restaurants feature in the first MICHELIN Guide Estonia. They tell us about culinary traditions and classic recipes passed down through generations, as well as the importance of the seasons, foraging and fermentation in Estonian culture. Discover why now is an exciting time to be a chef in Estonia, as the country’s diverse cuisine finally gets the international recognition it deserves.

Some MICHELIN Guide Selections:

Wicca

Laulasmaa, Estonia

Lahepere Villa

Kloogaranna, Estonia

Puri

Tallinn, Estonia

NOA Chef’s Hall

Tallinn, Estonia

Previews: Food & Wine Magazine – November 2022

Covernov22fwjmbmc emma

FOOD & WINEInside Food&Wine Magazine November 2022 Issue:

  • On the cover this month we have Irish chef Trevor Moran who runs Locust in Nashville, which was recently named America’s best restaurant. The restaurant is unique in many ways, but mostly because it only has 36 seats, doesn’t post menus on its website, and opens for just three days a week. 
  • In spirits this month, our expert Oisin Davis chats with Remy Savage, the Franco-Irishman bringing art into cocktail bars. Savage is known for being one of the most creative and dynamic forces in the global cocktail industry and has been behind some of the most celebrated and awarded cocktail bars in the world, all of which are fueled by his intense love of philosophy and art. 
  • Korean-style fried chicken restaurant Chimac has just opened its second outlet in Terenure, Dublin and has shared delicious Sunday lunch recipes to try this month. We also have recipes from Rosheen Kaul and Joanna Hu’s cookbook Chinese-ish and Thai recipes from the new Giggling Squid cookbook. 

Cannes View: La Palme d’Or Chef Christian Sinicropi’s Brilliant Ceramic Dishes

Set right on the spectacular coast of Cannes, France, La Palme d’Or rests inside the Grand Hyatt Cannes Hotel Martinez. This restaurant has won two Michelin stars, and is most known for its Mediterranean-style dishes. However, the most notable thing about this restaurant is the head chef, who creates bespoke ceramic dishware to for the restaurant to best compliment his unique recipes.

2019+-10+Christian+Sinicropi+Cuisine+Palme+d%27Or+%C2%A9J.+Kelagopian%2830%29.jpg
CHEF CHRISTIAN SINICROPI

Some places you fall in love with at first sight and La Palme d’Or is one of them. In the fabulous Art Deco setting of the Hotel Martinez, diners look down on the famous promenade of La Croisette and the Bay of Cannes, while savouring the luxury and refinement so beautifully brought together here. Of course, all this would be worth nothing without high-calibre cuisine. No worries on that score: chef Christian Sinicropi, a local man, has matters entirely in hand. At each stage of the “Mouvements” set menu, he homes in on one ingredient, supporting it with elements from its own ecosystem. The result is coherent and sophisticated, right down to the remarkably precise desserts by Julien Ochando. Definitely worthy of a Golden Palm award.

Previews: Food & Wine Magazine – October 2022

Coveroct22fw emma
Cover image by Ruth Calder-Potts

What’s inside the October 2022 issue of Food&Wine Magazine

This month our cover story features Rod and Julie Calder-Potts of Highbank Orchards in Kilkenny, who discuss the highs and lows of running Europe’s only fully organic orchard and apple-based business. They reveal why they finally decided to take the plunge into becoming an entirely organic business and the challenges the move presented.

In spirits, Oisin Davis talks to Justin Green of Ballyhovan House about autumn-inspired spirits as well as the fruition of his new business venture into the glorious world of gin.

Rounding out our issue, for this month’s Secret Restaurateur column, our industry insider deliberates the increasing struggles of running a restaurant and the harsh reality many restaurant owners have and continue to face.

Last but certainly not least, the highlight of our culinary calendar is The Food&Wine Restaurant of the Year awards in association with Rémy Martin. Taking place in the Round Room at Dublin’s Mansion House it’s a celebration of the exceptional talent, resilience and determination of the Irish food and drinks sector. You can buy tickets here and make sure to keep up with the countdown to the event via the hashtag #ROTYA2022 on InstagramFacebook and Twitter.

Previews: Food & Wine Magazine – October 2022

May be an image of 1 person, food and text that says 'FOOD &WINE THE #RESTAURANT ISSUE >> MEET AMERICA'S BEST NEW CHEFS .93 HERE Visit the Restaurant the Year An Insider's Guide to Great Food Cities F&W BEST WON CHEF OCTOBER 2022'

Food & Wine Restaurant of the Year 2022: Locust, Nashville

Locust in Nashville is the most perfect restaurant for our time.

Locust is open three days a week, for five and a half hours a day. Two hours are dedicated to lunch; the remaining time is for dinner service. On average, there are about six dishes on the menu, plus the occasional special (or three). The wine list is just as short. It’s hard to define what exactly the restaurant is, but as of right now, the food mostly has a Japanese bent. And on any given night, there might be a heavy metal soundtrack blasting from the open kitchen, with a few chefs head-banging away as they prepare your next dish. Locust is fully, uncompromisingly, and unapologetically itself—which is exactly what makes it so playful and brilliant.

Profile: Bryce Shuman’s ‘Wood-Fired Flavors’

“I found my way to James Beard-nominated chef Bryce Shuman (and his succulent pork ribs) during the summer of 2020 when he was offering a barbecue rib delivery service in Brooklyn and Manhattan out of the back of his Subaru. The food, the delivery, the entire presentation was flawless, ingenious—beautiful to the eye and supremely mouth-watering.” — Chris Ohlson (Director) Read more on NOWNESS