Cover Preview: Art Review Magazine – October 2022

In ArtReview’s October issue – out now – Chris Fite-Wassilak profiles Jeffrey Gibson, the artist whose works unpick and repattern mythologies around the depiction of native cultures: ‘Dolled up in intricate beadwork and bright kitsch plumes, Gibson’s flamboyant artefacts mock the anthropological impulse, while buzzingly suggesting new rituals’.

Renewal can be a fraught process, as ruangrupa found at this year’s documenta fifteen. ArtReview’s Mark Rappolt and J.J. Charlesworth spoke to the collective’s farid rakun and Ade Darmawan about their hopes for and the results of ruangrupa’s artistic direction of documenta fifteen – and what happens next. Their work confounded many assumptions about how this major survey exhibition should be organised – and who and what it should be for. One thing was certain: they “had to fight for every inch”.

It’s a story that has dominated recent cultural discourse – and is touched on by Naom Chomskyinterviewed by Nika Dubrovsky for ArtReview October. Chomsky, a keen admirer of David Graeber’s work, discusses with Dubrovsky the late anthropologist’s last project, neoliberalism and democracy, Western empiricism and imperialism, free speech, Roe v. Wade, and the war in Ukraine.

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Oct 7, 2022

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Entanglement snares prize

Trio helped launch new quantum revolution

Ancient DNA pioneer Svante Pääbo wins Nobel

By sequencing ancient hominins’ DNA, Pääbo explored “what makes us uniquely human”

NASA asteroid test strikes a blow for planetary defense

Observers study debris from DART’s crash into a space rock and wait to see how much the asteroid was deflected

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Health: Types Of Stroke – Ischemic & Hemorrhagic

There are two types of stroke:

transient ischemic attack (TIA) is sometimes called a “mini-stroke.” It is different from the major types of stroke, because blood flow to the brain is blocked for only a short time—usually no more than 5 minutes.1

Ischemic stroke

Most strokes are ischemic strokes.2 An ischemic stroke occurs when blood clots or other particles block the blood vessels to the brain.

Fatty deposits called plaque can also cause blockages by building up in the blood vessels.

Hemorrhagic stroke

A hemorrhagic stroke happens when an artery in the brain leaks blood or ruptures (breaks open). The leaked blood puts too much pressure on brain cells, which damages them.

High blood pressure and aneurysms—balloon-like bulges in an artery that can stretch and burst—are examples of conditions that can cause a hemorrhagic stroke.

Transient ischemic attack (TIA or “mini-stroke”)

For Blanche Teal-Cruise, a smoker for 40 years who also had high blood pressure, the transient ischemic attack (sometimes called a mini-stroke) she had on the way to work was a wake-up call. Read Blanche’s story.

TIAs are sometimes known as “warning strokes.” It is important to know that

  • A TIA is a warning sign of a future stroke.
  • A TIA is a medical emergency, just like a major stroke.
  • Strokes and TIAs require emergency care. Call 9-1-1 right away if you feel signs of a stroke or see symptoms in someone around you.
  • There is no way to know in the beginning whether symptoms are from a TIA or from a major type of stroke.
  • Like ischemic strokes, blood clots often cause TIAs.
  • More than a third of people who have a TIA and don’t get treatment have a major stroke within 1 year. As many as 10% to 15% of people will have a major stroke within 3 months of a TIA.1

Recognizing and treating TIAs can lower the risk of a major stroke. If you have a TIA, your health care team can find the cause and take steps to prevent a major stroke.

2022 Village Walks: Saint-Paul De Vence, France (4K)

Medieval walls encircle narrow streets and capture the heritage of more than a thousand years. Picking out the marks of history, either alone or with a guide, is to enter into the soul of Saint-Paul de Vence.

The fountain at the heart of the village fills St-Paul’s medieval vaults with music. To quote the poet Verlaine: “The fountain’s silvery murmur plays on.”

Filmed in August 2022.

Research Preview: Nature Magazine – Oct 6, 2022

Volume 610 Issue 7930

Deflecting asteroids is not enough — we need to know when they approach

After NASA’s DART asteroid-deflection experiment, a fully funded telescope for detecting space rocks is an equally pressing priority.

The oceans store more carbon than thought — but not enough to save the planet

Although the marine ‘carbon sink’ is bigger than expected, it is still inadequate to keep global warming at bay.

Electric cars could break the grid if future drivers stick to today’s routines

The rise in electric-vehicle ownership could overload the electric grid unless charging becomes a daytime activity.

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Oct 8, 2022

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A new macroeconomic era is emerging. What will it look like?

A great rebalancing between governments and central banks is under way.

For months there has been turmoil in financial markets and growing evidence of stress in the world economy. You might think that these are just the normal signs of a bear market and a coming recession. But, as our special report this week lays out, they also mark the painful emergence of a new regime in the world economy—a shift that may be as consequential as the rise of Keynesianism after the second world war, and the pivot to free markets and globalisation in the 1990s.

2022 Walks: Streets And Piazzas Of Rome, Italy

Filmed in October 2022.

Rome was called the “Eternal City” by the ancient Romans because they believed that no matter what happened in the rest of the world, the city of Rome would always remain standing. Exploring the city centre by foot surrounded by glorious monuments and colossal remains takes you back in time to the “glory that was Rome”.

With its unparalleled history, Rome is the third most visited city in Europe and the fourteenth worldwide. It attracts visitors from all over the world who are impatient to discover the city’s impressive monuments and archaeological sites; not to mention its renowned cuisine and its lively atmosphere.

When exploring the Colosseum, visitors will easily imagine how the gladiators fought for their life in the arena, cheered by the crowd. In the Circus Maximus, travelers will picture the chariots crashing into each other in order to be first in the race, and in the Roman Forum visualise what the Roman public life was like.

Front Page: The New York Times – October 6, 2022

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In Rebuke to West, OPEC and Russia Aim to Raise Oil Prices With Big Supply Cut

Led by Saudi Arabia, the oil cartel OPEC Plus pledged to reduce output by two million barrels a day.

OPEC Move Shows the Limits of Biden’s Fist-Bump Diplomacy With the Saudis

OPEC’s decision to curb oil production was a signal that President Biden’s influence over his Gulf allies was far less than he had hoped.

U.S. Aims to Turn Taiwan Into Giant Weapons Depot

Officials say Taiwan needs to become a “porcupine” with enough weapons to hold out if the Chinese military blockades and invades it, even if Washington decides to send troops.