Tag Archives: Pandemics

Research Preview: Science Magazine – Oct 14, 2022

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How SARS-CoV-2 battles our immune system

Meet the protein arsenal wielded by the pandemic virus

Evidence backs natural origin for pandemic, report asserts

Authors were dropped from broader Lancet review

A viral arsenal

SARS-CoV-2 wields versatile proteins to foil our immune system’s counterattack

Hydrogen power gets a boost

A fuel cell gains more power from ion-conducting, porous covalent organic frameworks

Research Preview: Science Magazine – August 19, 2022

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Small stowaways on new NASA rocket promise big science

Batteries allowing, CubeSats will target lunar ice and more

China rises to first place in one key metric of research impact

Other methods still put the United States somewhat ahead

New law’s big payout for farming has uncertain climate payoff

Measures to capture carbon in soil may be less effective than hoped, scientists say

Bioengineering soybean plants to improve regulation of photoprotection—a natural process that enables plants to cope with excess absorbed light energy—improved soybean seed yield by up to 33% in field trials.

Read that study and more this week in Science: https://fcld.ly/r6g2kix

Cover Preview: Harper’s Magazine – June 2022

Permanent Pandemic

by Justin E. H. Smith

Will COVID controls keep controlling us?

In January 2022 I came down with mild symptoms of something or other. I was already triple-vaxxed, with a French vaccine passport (“pass vaccinal”) on my iPhone to prove it, and like a true pioneer I had already suffered through a bout of COVID-19 long before, in March 2020. 

News Analysis: Putin’s Next Move, India’s Pandemic & The Rise Of Robot Critics

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Putin’s next movethe pandemic in India (10:20) and the rise of the robot critic (18:35).

Global Health Essays: ‘The Politics Of Stopping Pandemics’ (New Yorker)

He identifies a cluster of non-medical drivers of deadly outbreaks—war, political instability, human migration, poverty, urbanization, anti-science and nationalist sentiment, and climate change—and maintains that advances in biomedicine must be accompanied by concerted action on these geopolitical matters.

War and Pestilence ride together as two of the Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse, and there is no shortage of historical precedent to demonstrate the aptness of the allegory. The great influenza pandemic that began in 1918 was propelled, in part, by troop movements and population shifts at the end of the First World War. Both the First and the Second World Wars produced typhus epidemics. Armed conflicts cause malnutrition, poor pest control, and sanitation problems; even the soil often becomes contaminated. Medical facilities are destroyed; doctors and nurses, diverted to combat duty, are unable to provide care, and vaccination and other mass-treatment programs usually falter.

Read full essay at The New Yorker

Science Podcast: Museum Collections & Pandemics, Mice That Hallucinate

Podcast Producer Meagan Cantwell talks with Pamela Soltis, a professor and curator with the Florida Museum of Natural History at the University of Florida and the director of the University of Florida Biodiversity Institute, about how natural collections at museums can be a valuable resource for understanding future disease outbreaks.

Read the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine report Biological Collections: Ensuring Critical Research and Education for the 21st Century. This segment is part of our coverage of the 2021 AAAS Annual Meeting.

Also on this week’s show, Katharina Schmack, a research associate at Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory, joins producer Joel Goldberg to talk about giving mice a quiz that makes them hallucinate. Observing the mice in this state helps researchers make connections between dopamine, hallucinations, and mental illness.

Analysis: ‘Preventing The Next Pandemic’ – Bill Gates

The unfortunate reality is that COVID-19 might not be the last pandemic. The threat of the next pandemic will always be hanging over our heads—unless the world takes steps to prevent it. You can learn more about this topic in our 2021 Annual Letter at http://gatesnot.es/3a5KOLU

Documentary: ’31 Days In March 2020′ – The Month Coronavirus Unraveled American Business (Video)

March 2020 began on a high note for American business and ended with the economy in tatters This WSJ documentary goes behind-the-scenes to reveal how the coronavirus pandemic ripped through American business during the month of March 2020 — told through the firsthand accounts of 12 prominent executives. When the coronavirus tore through industry, commerce and society in March 2020, the U.S. economy came to a screeching halt. Top executives relive the tough decisions they made as they scrambled to weather the storm. Photo Illustration: Adele Morgan/The Wall Street Journal