Tag Archives: Science Reviews

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – July 1, 2022

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An ash and gas plume rises from Hunga volcano, Tonga, on 14 January 2022. Global geophysical observations reveal that the climactic eruption that followed on 15 January produced a broad range of atmospheric waves, with pressure wave amplitudes comparable with those from the 1883 Krakatau eruption. While propagating over the world’s oceans, the remarkable atmospheric waves generated complex fast-traveling tsunamis. See pages 3091, and 95.

Photo: Taaniela Kula, Tonga Geological Services

United Kingdom set to abandon EU funding and go it alone
  • Horizon Europe grants held hostage over Brexit dispute

Silence greets requests to flag retracted studies

Authors and editors ignored warnings about citing noted fraudster, exposing a problem in scholarly publishing

Hidden carbon layer sparked ancient bout of global warming

Deep carbon exhumed by volcanic rift between Greenland and Europe implicated in 56-million-year-old hothouse

Cover Preview: Nature Magazine – June 30, 2022

Volume 606 Issue 7916

Order out of chaos

The cover shows an artistic representation of various cancer cells. The large-scale gains, losses and rearrangements of DNA seen in chromosomal instability are a typical feature of cancer — but there is no comprehensive framework to decode the causes of this genomic variability and their possible links to disease. In this week’s issue, Florian Markowetz, Geoff Macintyre and their colleagues present such a framework with a compendium of 17 signatures of chromosomal instability that can be used to predict how tumours might respond to drugs and that help to identify future therapeutic targets. The team created the compendium by examining 7,880 tumours representing 33 types of cancer. In a separate paper, Nischalan Pillay and colleagues examined 9,873 cancers to generate 

Preview: New Scientist Magazine – July 2, 2022

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How readily should we swallow the idea of diets that delay ageing?

The promise of a new diet that can add as much as a decade to your life is certainly tempting – and might well be proven to work – but for now should be swallowed with a pinch of salt

  • FEATURES Ten years after the Higgs discovery, what now for particle physics?
  • NEWS 75 per cent of the world’s top websites allow bad passwords
  • NEWS Largest known bacteria in the world are visible to the naked eye
  • NEWS Was warfare responsible for the origin of complex civilisation?

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – June 24, 2022

COVER: Humanity’s actions have committed us to a warming climate and limited our options for mitigation. Although there is no turning back, some paths are still open to avoid catastrophic climate change and reduce its impacts. We must act now to drastically reduce greenhouse gas emissions and change our approaches to growing food, consuming products, and managing ecosystems to avoid a dire future. See page 1392.

Illustration: Myriam Wares

Our climate future

Time to act

CAROLINE ASH

The matter of a clean energy future

JAMES MORTON TURNER

Cover Previews: Nature Magazine – June 23, 2022

The science of inequality

To study inequality is to confront a world of contrasts: excessive wealth next to palpable poverty; sickness abutting health. The COVID pandemic has exposed and worsened many such disparities. This week, Nature presents a special collection of articles focusing on the researchers trying to quantify and reduce inequality. Whether they are measuring the effects of the pandemic or testing interventions to lift people out of poverty, the message is simple: gathering the right information will help to mitigate the harm caused by inequality.

Cover image: Mike McQuade.

Volume 606 Issue 7915

Table of Contents

  1. The science of inequality
  2. This Week
  3. News in Focus
  4. Opinion
  5. Research
  6. Amendments & Corrections
  7. Nature Outlook

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – June 17, 2022

The triumph and tragedy of the Higgs boson

Ten years ago, physicists found what they predicted. Little new has followed

Ancient DNA reveals Black Death source

Graves in Kyrgyzstan hold early victims of plague that swept medieval Europe

Studies tying weather extremes to global warming gain rigor

Record-shattering events spur climate attribution advances

Previews: New Scientist Magazine – June 18, 2022

New Scientist Default Image

What is time? The mysterious essence of the fourth dimension

The nature of time is a tricky notion to pin down. But whether it is a fundamental part of our universe or just an illusion has huge implications

COVER STORIES

FEATURES Could we ever go back in time? Relativity does not rule it out

FEATURES How do we sense time? The brain cells that order our memories

Science: Fossil Mystery Solved, A Silk Mother Of Pearl, Bolivian Amazon

The puzzle of PalaeospondylusOver a hundred years ago, archaeologists discovered fossils of the aquatic animal Palaeospondylus. But since then researchers have been unable to place where this animal sits on the tree of life. Now, new analysis of Palaeospondylus’s anatomy might help to solve this mystery.

08:18 Research Highlights

A strong, silk-based version of mother of pearl, and the parrots that use their heads when climbing.

Research Highlight: Silk imitates mother of pearl for a tough, eco-friendly material

Research Highlight: A ‘forbidden’ body type? These parrots flout the rules

10:51 How lasers revealed an ancient Amazonian civilization

Archaeologists have used LiDAR to uncover evidence of an ancient civilization buried in the Bolivian Amazon. The team’s work suggests that this area was not as sparsely populated in pre-Hispanic times as previously thought.

Research article: Prümers et al.

News and Views: Large-scale early urban settlements in Amazonia

Nature Video: Lost beneath the leaves: Lasers reveal an ancient Amazonian civilisation

16:21 Briefing Chat

We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, the debate surrounding the first transplant of pig kidneys into humans, and the plants grown in lunar soil.

Nature News: First pig kidneys transplanted into people: what scientists think

Cover Preview: Science Magazine – May 20, 2022

Enhanced charge density wave coherence in a light-quenched, high-temperature superconductor

The deubiquitinase USP8 targets ESCRT-III to promote incomplete cell division

All topological bands of all nonmagnetic stoichiometric materials