Tag Archives: Storms

Storm Chasing: ‘Níłtsą́ – A Monsoon Film’ (2022)

Níłtsą́: the Navajo word for ‘rain’. Two years in the making. Almost 80 total days of chasing. Tens of thousands of miles driven. All packed into 12 minutes of the best storms and moments from the 2021/22 monsoon in Arizona. These films are my entire heart and passion for what I do.

Sometimes I’m so tired I don’t even want to chase, and I have to MAKE myself get into the truck and start driving. And it’s almost always worth it. One of my supporters on Patreon answered my call for a possible new name for the series. I wasn’t sure if I wanted to, and it would take something special to get me to do it. Leonard’s wife suggested Niltsa, and I immediately fell in love with it. It’s a gorgeous word.

Filmed and edited by: Mike Olbinski

Hurricanes: Why Storm Surge Can Be So Deadly

Storm surge is the deadliest part of a hurricane. Discover what causes this effect, and which regions are most at risk.

Storm surge is produced by water being pushed toward the shore by the force of the winds moving cyclonically around the storm. The impact on surge of the low pressure associated with intense storms is minimal in comparison to the water being forced toward the shore by the wind.
Wind and Pressure Components of Hurricane Storm Surge

The maximum potential storm surge for a particular location depends on a number of different factors. Storm surge is a very complex phenomenon because it is sensitive to the slightest changes in storm intensity, forward speed, size (radius of maximum winds-RMW), angle of approach to the coast, central pressure (minimal contribution in comparison to the wind), and the shape and characteristics of coastal features such as bays and estuaries.

Views: The Catastrophic Damage Of Hurricane Ian

Four days after Hurricane Ian made landfall in Florida, and then again in South Carolina on Friday, there are dozens dead, millions without power, and billions in damage. Correspondent Kris van Cleave reports on the aftermath of the catastrophic storm.

Science: Navigating Life, Coastal Storminess, Boa Constrictors, Old Trees

Your ability to find your way may depend on where you grew up and how coastal storminess is changing.

00:47 Your ability to find your way may depend on where you grew up

Researchers have long been trying to understand why some humans are better at navigating than others. This week, researchers show that where someone grew up plays an important role in their ability to find their way; the more winding and disorganised the layouts of your childhood were, the better navigator you’ll be later in life.
Research article: Coutrot et al.

08:57 Research Highlights

How boas can squeeze without suffocating themselves, and why being far from humans helps trees live a long life.
Research Highlight: How boa constrictors squeeze and breathe at the same time

Research Highlight: Where are Earth’s oldest trees? Far from prying eyes

11:39 How coastal storminess is changing

Coastal flooding causes billions of dollars in damage each year. Rising sea levels are known to be a key driver, but the importance of another factor, storm surges, is less clear. Typically after accounting for increasing sea level, they’re not thought to make much of an impact. However new research suggests that this may not be the case.
Research article: Calafat et al.

16:10 Briefing Chat

We discuss some highlights from the Nature Briefing. This time, a brain implant allows a person who is completely paralysed to communicate, and penguin-like bone density suggests Spinosaurus may have hunted underwater.
Science: In a first, brain implant lets man with complete paralysis spell out thoughts: ‘I love my cool son.’

National Geographic: Spinosaurus had penguin-like bones, a sign of hunting underwater

Video: A swimming dinosaur: The tail of Spinosaurus

Cities: 50-Year Plan To Halt Flooding In Copenhagen

As the sea level rises on the shores of Copenhagen—likely by at least a foot and a half by the end of the century—the city will become more vulnerable to flooding during storms. So the government is now making plans to take a drastic step as part of its plan for protection: Over the coming decades, it will build an artificial island to hold the rising water back, while doubling as room for new housing.

Climate Views: El Salvador Battles Drought & Storms

Central America’s smallest country, El Salvador, is being increasingly battered by the effects of climate change – by drought, floods, and violent storms. The small organization CESTA has long been fighting for more environmental protection in its own country.

Views: ‘Vorticity 4’ – Storms In Timelapse (4K)

Filmed and Edited by: Mike Oblinski

Music by Péter Nánási: peternanasi.bandcamp.com/

It’s hard to believe it’s been five years since I made my first Vorticity film. The one goal I had that year was to get a tornado on time-lapse for the first time ever. That happened and it’s been a wild, incredible ride since. The storms I’ve witnessed have been moving, stunning and a few of them, legendary (at least to us chasers!).

The 2021 season was no different. The number of supercells we saw and the level of structure was absolutely amazing. From Sudan, Texas to Malta, Montana…the chases were a blast and the time-lapses I caught were just fantastic fun. So many supercells, so many chases…I think I counted about 27 days we chased from late April to late June. Definitely one of the more active springs in recent years. It was good enough that I felt I could put out another worthy entry in the Vorticity series, so hopefully you agree!

Morning News Podcast: Deadly Winter Storms, Capitol Riot Commission

Deadly winter storm stretches across 25 states, Nancy Pelosi outlines steps to create 9/11-style commission to investigate Capitol riot, and Tennessee man leaves $5 million to dog in his will.

Top New Timelapse Videos: ‘Monsoon 6’ (4K) – Storm Chasing By Mike Oblinski

Filmed and Edited by: Mike Oblinski

Music by Péter Nánási: peternanasi.bandcamp.com/

I’ve never spent two years making a Monsoon film before, so this was a first. Part of it was wanting to put out the best possible film I could, but a good chunk of it was the fact our recent summer storm seasons have been subpar at best, with 2020 the worst I can remember. 2019 wasn’t horrible, but there was about zero dust storms, with only a single haboob clip to salvage from that summer, so I wanted to wait until I had something more to add to it.

Luckily for me, August 16th, 2020 happened and we scored a fantastic haboob chase from Casa Grande to Gila Bend along Interstate 8. It was what I had been hoping and praying for to complete this film. That was the only legit haboob day of the past two years and I’m glad I was there for it! Not only for this film, but for the BBC and one of their upcoming projects I’m proud to be a part of!

A lot was left on the cutting room floor, in fact, it might be an entire other film, but it was important to me to include only the best, most unique stuff I saw the last two years, plus keep it under 9 minutes long! Finding music was a struggle, so I decided to work once again with Péter Nánási and have a custom score created for Monsoon 6. And boy, he knows me well and hit it out of the park! Thank you sir!

I hope you enjoy this film! It’s the result of 30,000+ miles, hundreds of thousands of time-lapse frames captured and 60+ days chasing. Some highlights include epic downbursts, gorgeous light, mountains, desert, a stunning supercell and yes, rainbows. Photographed all across the great state of Arizona, where I’ve lived my entire life.

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