Tag Archives: The Economist Magazine

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Dec 3, 2022

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The Economist – December 3, 2022 issue:

Xi Jinping’s zero-covid policy has turned a health crisis into a political one

Caught between raging disease and unpopular and costly lockdowns, he has no good fix

Will the cap fit?

Why the West’s proposed price cap on Russian oil is no magic weapon

CoD and chips

Why trustbusters should let Microsoft buy Activision Blizzard

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Nov 26, 2022

Frozen out

The Economist – November 26, 2022 issue:

Europe faces an enduring crisis of energy and geopolitics

This will weaken it and threaten its global position

Disney brings back a star of the past. But its real problem is the script

Hollywood is suffering from the brutal economics of streaming

Russian “offshore journalists” need help, not hindrance

Europe should let them do their jobs

Analysis: The World Ahead 2023 – The Economist

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Ten trends to watch in the coming year

A letter from Tom Standage, editor of “The World Ahead 2023”

1. All eyes on Ukraine. Energy prices, inflation, interest rates, economic growth, food shortages—all depend on how the conflict plays out in the coming months. Rapid progress by Ukraine could threaten Vladimir Putin, but a grinding stalemate seems the most likely outcome. Russia will try to string out the conflict in the hope that energy shortages, and political shifts in America, will undermine Western support for Ukraine.

2. Recessions loom. Major economies will go into recession as central banks raise interest rates to stifle inflation, an after-effect of the pandemic since inflamed by high energy prices. America’s recession should be relatively mild; Europe’s will be more brutal. The pain will be global as the strong dollar hurts poor countries already hit by soaring food prices.

3. Climate silver lining. As countries rush to secure their energy supplies, they are turning back to dirty fossil fuels. But in the medium term the war will accelerate the switch to renewables as a safer alternative to hydrocarbons supplied by autocrats. As well as wind and solar, nuclear and hydrogen will benefit too.

4. Peak China? Some time in April China’s population will be overtaken by India’s, at around 1.43bn. With China’s population in decline, and its economy facing headwinds, expect much discussion of whether China has peaked. Slower growth means its economy may never overtake America’s in size.

5. Divided America. Although Republicans did worse than expected in the midterm elections, social and cultural divides on abortion, guns and other hot-button issues continue to widen after a string of contentious Supreme Court rulings. Donald Trump’s formal entry into the 2024 presidential race will pour fuel on the fire.

6. Flashpoints to watch. The intense focus on the war in Ukraine heightens the risk of conflict elsewhere. With Russia distracted, conflicts are breaking out in its backyard. China may decide that there will never be a better time to make a move on Taiwan. India-China tensions could flare in the Himalayas. And might Turkey try to nab a Greek island in the Aegean?

7. Shifting alliances. Amid geopolitical shifts, alliances are responding. nato, revitalised by the war in Ukraine, will welcome two new members. Will Saudi Arabia join the Abraham accords, an emerging bloc? Other groupings of growing importance include the Quad and aukus (two American-led clubs intended to deal with China’s rise) and i2u2—not a rock band, but a sustainability forum linking India, Israel, the United Arab Emirates and the United States.

8. Revenge tourism. Take that, covid! As travellers engage in post-lockdown “revenge” tourism, traveller spending will almost regain its 2019 level of $1.4trn, but only because inflation has pushed up prices. The actual number of international tourist trips, at 1.6bn, will still be below the pre-pandemic level of 1.8bn in 2019. Business travel will remain weak as firms cut costs.

9. Metaverse reality check. Will the idea of working and playing in virtual worlds catch on beyond video games? 2023 will provide some answers as Apple launches its first headset and Meta decides whether to change its strategy as its share price languishes. Meanwhile, a less complicated and more immediately useful shift may be the rise of “passkeys” to replace passwords.

10. New year, new jargon. Never heard of a passkey? Fear not! Turn to our special section, “Understand This”, which rounds up the vital vocabulary that will be useful to know in 2023. nimbys are out and yimbys are in; cryptocurrencies are uncool and post-quantum cryptography is hot; but can you define a frozen conflict, or synfuel? We’ve got you covered.

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Nov 12, 2022

The Trump effect

The Economist – Inside the November 12, 2022 issue:

The Trump effect

Despite the former president’s efforts, America and its democracy look stronger after the midterms

Imagining peace in Ukraine

How a stable and successful country could emerge from the trauma of Russia’s invasion

Great powers must talk

Refusing to speak is what children do when they are angry

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Oct 29, 2022

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Rishi Sunak’s promise of stability is a low bar for Britain

Reasons to be cheerful are scant

Will Iran’s women win?

Their uprising could be the beginning of the end of Iran’s theocracy

India’s next green revolution

The country’s clean-energy push shows a way to escape the coal addiction

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Oct 22, 2022

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Welcome to Britaly

A country of political instability, low growth and subordination to the bond markets

In 2012 liz truss and Kwasi Kwarteng, two of the authors of a pamphlet called “Britannia Unchained”, used Italy as a warning. Bloated public services, low growth, poor productivity: the problems of Italy and other southern European countries were also present in Britain. Ten years later, in their botched attempt to forge a different path, Ms Truss and Mr Kwarteng have helped make the comparison inescapable. Britain is still blighted by disappointing growth and regional inequality. But it is also hobbled by chronic political instability and under the thumb of the bond markets. Welcome to Britaly.

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Oct 15, 2022

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The Communist Party’s obsession with control will make China weaker but more dangerous

Its five-yearly congress will further tighten one man’s grip

It will be an orderly affair. From October 16th the grandees of China’s Communist Party will gather in the Great Hall of the People in Beijing for their five-yearly congress. Not a teacup will be out of place; not a whisper of protest will be audible. The Communist Party has always been obsessed with control. But under President Xi Jinping that obsession has deepened. After three decades of opening and reform under previous leaders, China has in many ways become more closed and autocratic under Mr Xi. Surveillance has broadened. Censorship has stiffened. Party cells flex their muscles in private firms. Preserving the party’s grip on power trumps any other consideration.

Preview: The Economist Magazine – Oct 8, 2022

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A new macroeconomic era is emerging. What will it look like?

A great rebalancing between governments and central banks is under way.

For months there has been turmoil in financial markets and growing evidence of stress in the world economy. You might think that these are just the normal signs of a bear market and a coming recession. But, as our special report this week lays out, they also mark the painful emergence of a new regime in the world economy—a shift that may be as consequential as the rise of Keynesianism after the second world war, and the pivot to free markets and globalisation in the 1990s.

Previews: The Economist Magazine – October 1, 2022

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How not to run a country

Liz Truss’s new government may already be dead in the water

Hurricane Ian pummels Florida

The Sunshine State has seen 40% of America’s hurricanes and a huge population boom

Previews: The Economist Magazine – Sept 24, 2022

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An energy crisis and geopolitics are creating a new-look Gulf

It will be richer, more powerful—and more volatile

Vladimir Putin vows to send more invaders. The West should arm Ukraine faster

It has a window of opportunity to push Russian forces back