Tag Archives: Gardens

Views: How Singapore’s ‘Gardens By The Bay’ Was Constructed (Video)

The ‘Gardens by the Bay’ are home to 100,000 thriving plants–but for the entire setup to work, the designers had to figure out a way to protect the eerily-designed structures against the strong winds that hit Singapore.

The Gardens by the Bay is a nature park spanning 101 hectares in the Central Region of Singapore, adjacent to the Marina Reservoir. The park consists of three waterfront gardens: Bay South Garden, Bay East Garden and Bay Central Garden.

Walks: ‘Tuileries Garden – Paris, France’ (4K Video)

The Tuileries Garden is a public garden located between the Louvre and the Place de la Concorde in the 1st arrondissement of Paris, France. Created by Catherine de’ Medici as the garden of the Tuileries Palace in 1564, it was eventually opened to the public in 1667 and became a public park after the French Revolution.

Scotland Estate Tour: Georgian Manor With Gardens In Edinburgh

In just under 1 acre of beautiful gardens and a stones throw from the city center, this stunning period property has almost 6,000 sq. ft. (547 sq. meters) of accommodation and a separate 3 bedroom coach house. Considered Edinburgh’s finest private home this highly prized Georgian mansion is a once-in-a-generation opportunity and arguably the very best family home in Edinburgh.

The house is located in the affluent and prestigious Murrayfield area, especially sought after for its close proximity to world-class schools for every age group. This outstanding property dates back to the 1800’s. In the late 1990s, acclaimed Scottish architect Lorn Macneal enhanced the property with a skillful remodeling of the west wing, synthesizing flow, space and light, whilst retaining the detailed majesty of the original design.

Contemporary, prosperous, and rich in history, Edinburgh is undoubtedly the UKs’ second cultural capital and comes with a lifestyle that boasts unrivalled access to urban and country life. Scotland’s highlands are within easy reach of the house, offering majestic and untouched scenery amid lochs and mountains, while air and rail access to the UK and rest of the world is only around a 15-minute drive away.

Travel & Nature: ‘Bladon Lake At Blenheim Palace’ In Woodstock, England

Blenheim Palace is a monumental country house in Woodstock, OxfordshireEngland. It is the principal residence of the Dukes of Marlborough, and the only non-royal, non-episcopal country house in England to hold the title of palace. The palace, one of England’s largest houses, was built between 1705 and 1722, and designated a UNESCOWorld Heritage Site in 1987.

Gardens & Landscapes: ‘Downhill Demesne’ In Northern Ireland (Video)

Experience the beauty and mystery of County Londonderry’s Downhill Demesne in this video tour of the vast landscape – fascinating ruins, an intriguing clifftop temple, unusual plants and trees, plus much more. We’ll be shedding light on the eccentric bishop that lived here and treating you to dramatic views of the North Atlantic.

The Mussenden Temple and Downhill Demesne is a National Trust property consisting of Downhill Castle and its estate, which includes the Mussenden Temple.

Arts & History: ‘The Book Of Citrus Fruits’ By J.C. Volkamer (Taschen)

Ordering plants by post mostly from Italy, Germany, North Africa, and even the Cape of Good Hope, the Nuremberg merchant Volkamer was a devotee of the fragrant and exotic citrus at a time when such fruits were still largely unknown north of the Alps.

TASCHEN

Famous First Edition: First printing of 5,000 numbered copies

Have you ever thought of citrus fruits as celestial bodies, angelically suspended in the sky? Perhaps not, but J. C. Volkamer (1644–1720) did—commissioning an extravagant and breathtaking series of large-sized copperplates representing citrons, lemons, and bitter oranges in surreal scenes of majesty and wonder.

His garden came to contain a wide variety of specimens, and he became so obsessed with the fruits that he commissioned a team of copperplate engravers to create 256 plates of 170 varieties of citrus fruits, many depicted life size, published in a two-volume work

In both volumes, Volkamer draws on years of hands-on experience to present a far-reaching account of citrus fruits and how to tend them—from a meticulous walk-through of how to construct temporary orangeries, glasshouses, and hothouses for growing pineapples to commentary on each fruit variety, including its size, shape, color, scent, tree or shrub, leaves, and country of origin.

In each plate, Volkamer pays tribute to the verdant landscapes of Northern Italy, his native Nuremberg, and other sites that captured his imagination. From Genovese sea views to the Schönbrunn Palace, each locale is depicted in the same exceptionaldetail as the fruit that overhangs it. We witness branches heavy with grapefruits arching across a sun-bathed yard in Bologna and marvel at a huge pineapple plant sprouting from a South American town. The result is at once a fantastical line-up of botanical beauty and a highly poetic tour through the lush gardens and places where these fruits grew.

Few colored sets of Volkamer’s work are still in existence today. This publication draws on the two recently discovered hand-colored volumes in the city of Fürth’s municipal archive in Schloss Burgfarrnbach. The reprint also includes 56 newly discovered illustrations that Volkamer intended to present in a third volume.

The author

Iris Lauterbach studied art history and romance languages and literature in Mainz, Pavia and Paris and obtained her doctorate in 1985. Since 1991 she has been a member of the research department of the Central Institute for Art History in Munich and teaches the history of garden architecture at the Technical University in Munich. Her main areas of research include France during the 18th century and the history of European garden art from the 16th to the 20th century, while she has also carried out extensive research about the restitution of artworks that were looted during the Second World War.

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Walking Tour: ‘Bonsai Tree Garden’ In Tokyo, Japan

Within the Japanese garden in the middles of Showa Kinen Park, there is a separate bonsai tree exhibit. Here many of the trees are 100 years old, and even one that is 300 years old! I didn’t know that there are so many different kinds of seasonal bonsai trees; Japanese maple bonsai with the read leaves, or trees with fruits and berries. If you ever come to visit Showa Kinen Park, please be sure to stop by to see these old souls.

Architecture Books: ‘The Conservatory – Gardens Under Glass’ (Princeton)

Through evocative archival and contemporary photographs, drawings of landmark structures, and graceful, accessible text, The Conservatory  celebrates the patrons and designers who advanced the technology and architectural majesty of these light-filled structures. The importance of conservatories continues to grow with efforts to conserve phenomenal plants and their environments.

Elegant and magnificent, conservatories reveal fascinating social, cultural, botanical, and engineering advances as they have evolved across history. First appearing in the eighteenth century as simple structures designed to protect fruit trees and other delicate plants from harsh European winters, conservatories became grand glass houses that spread across the European continent, to the Americas, and ultimately around the world.

Alan Stein is President and Director of Architecture at Tanglewood Conservatories, Ltd., founded in 1993 with his wife and business partner, Nancy Virts. The company’s mission is to conceive and build the finest classical and modern glass conservatories. Tanglewood’s work has been published in Architectural Digest, Garden Design Magazine, The New York Times, Town & County and other periodicals around the world. Alan studied design at the California College of Art and graduated from the University of Maryland with a professional degree in architecture. He lives in Maryland.

Nancy Virts is cofounder of Tanglewood Conservatories, Ltd., with her husband and business partner, Alan Stein. The company conceives and builds the finest classical and modern glass conservatories. Tanglewood’s work has been published in Architectural Digest, Garden Design magazine, the New York Times, Town & Country, and other periodicals around the world.

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Italian Gardens: ‘Giardino Giusti in Verona’ and ‘Villa Fracanzan Piovene’ near Vicenza – “Shakespearean”

Giardino Giusti in Verona and Villa Fracanzan Piovene: The centuries-old Italian gardens that evoke the romance of Romeo and Juliet.

November 7, 2020

The name Giusti has been synonymous with one of Italy’s most celebrated Renaissance gardens since the late 16th century. Originally wool-dyers from Prato in Tuscany, the Giusti family had moved its business north in the previous century, settling in an unglamorous industrial suburb of Verona. Within a few generations, its members were rich and had also acquired the requisite antiquarian and artistic tastes of true Renaissance gentlefolk.

The garden created by Agostino Giusti between 1565 and 1580 was intended to fulfil various functions. It had to showcase his collection of Roman inscriptions and to serve as a setting for the lavish theatrical and musical productions—the predecessors of opera—then in vogue. To this day, the garden retains the surprise element of a stage set, presenting a magnificent and entertaining spectacle that totally confounds one’s expectations of a city garden.

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