Tag Archives: Society

Preview: New York Times Magazine – Dec 4, 2022

Photo illustration by Todd St. John.

@NYTMagDecember 4, 2022 issue:

Where Does All the Cardboard Come From? I Had to Know.

Entire forests and enormous factories running 24/7 can barely keep up with demand. This is how the cardboard economy works.

‘Avatar’ and the Mystery of the Vanishing Blockbuster

It was the highest-grossing film in history, but for years it was remembered mainly for having been forgotten. Why?

After Covid, Playing Trumpet Taught Me How to Breathe Again

The benefits of group (music) therapy.

Tom Stoppard Fears the Virus of Antisemitism Has Been Reactivated

Previews: The Progressive Magazine – December 2022

The Progressive Magazine - Reporting the truth since 1909. - Progressive.org

@theprogressive Magazine December 2022/January 2023:

Revitalizing America’s News Deserts

The devastating loss of local news outlets is a crisis for democracy. We can still fix it.

Edge of Sports: The World Cup of Shame

Qatar’s event is a human rights disaster—and a spectacle of sportswashing in an age of capitalist decay.

Big Brother at the Border

U.S. Customs and Border Protection is searching, downloading, and storing electronic data from thousands of travelers’ devices each year without a warrant.

Preview: New York Times Magazine – Nov 27, 2022

Current cover

November 27, 2022: In this issue, Jesse Barron on the San Francisco judge whose ruling in juvenile court came back to haunt him; Caity Weaver on her stay in the “world’s quietest room”; Jon Mooallem on the director Noah Baumbach and his new movie, “White Noise”; and more.

The Judge and the Case That Came Back to Haunt Him

In 1981, Anthony Kline helped send a juvenile offender to prison for four decades. This year, in a twist of fate, he had a chance to decide her case again.

How Noah Baumbach Made ‘White Noise’ a Disaster Movie for Our Moment

When the world shut down in 2020, the filmmaker found solace in Don DeLillo’s supposedly unadaptable novel — and turned it into a film that speaks to our deepest fears.

Could I Survive the ‘Quietest Place on Earth’?

Legends tell of an echoless chamber in an old Minneapolis recording studio that drives visitors insane. I figured I’d give it a whirl.

Qatar: Inside The Emirate’s Culture & Traditions (DW)

On the surface, Qatar is a dazzling and colorful Arab country, home to sheikhs and big business. But migrant workers without Qatari citizenship make up nearly 90% of Qatar’s total population – the highest such rate in the world.

Anyone traveling to Qatar arrives with plenty of prejudices: that it is a corrupt, filthy-rich emirate full of forced laborers who have no rights; that it is home to businessmen whose practices are, at best, questionable. But for the Qataris themselves, and the millions of guest workers from all over the world who live there, the picture is more nuanced.

Yes, Qatar is a dictatorship with an emir who enjoys almost unlimited power. But at the same time, Qatar is remarkably open and progressive. The emirate is tiny, and yet tremendously fascinating – with its vast desert landscapes, its bizarrely-shaped mountains and its picturesque sandy beaches.

Perspectives: Harper’s Magazine – December 2022

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Harper’s Magazine, December 2022 – Should we be Rooting for the Apocalypse? Rachel Kushner on Timothée Chalamet’s Cannibal Turn Sasha Frere-Jones Searches for Perfect Sound A Christmas Story by Kate DiCamillo And More.

Apocalypse Nowish

The sense of an ending

READINGS

You Talkin’ to Me?

by Meghan O’Gieblyn

Martha Stewart Living

by Martha StewartChelsea Handler

His Folk Nation

by Darryl Pinckney

No Times Like the Present

A Forest of Berlin

by Brenda Coultas

Preview: The New Yorker Magazine – Nov 21, 2022

Disappointed elephant standing on red surf board.

The New Yorker Magazine – In the weeks leading up to the 2022 midterms, many pundits predicted that a “red wave” of Republican victories would sweep across the country. There was precedent for this: historically, the President’s party tends to lose seats in midterm contests. Republicans picked up some seats, but this year’s returns showed a much more even match than many had been expecting. With votes still being counted, it seems that the G.O.P. will most likely eke out a narrow majority in the House, and control of the Senate may not be decided for weeks. Whatever you call the over-all result in the country’s close political battles, it didn’t quite amount to a wave.

For the cover of the November 21, 2022, issue, the cartoonist Barry Blitt followed a long tradition and chose an animal to represent reality metaphorically: “The chance to draw an elephant—especially one on a surfboard—is irresistible for a cartoonist, but I can’t help thinking how counterintuitive it is to represent the G.O.P. in its current form with such a dignified, graceful, sensitive-seeming beast.”

Previews: The Guardian Weekly November 11, 2022

The cover of the 11 November edition of the Guardian Weekly.

The Guardian Weekly, November 11, 2022:

Benjamin Netanyahu is nothing if not a fighter. Having been ousted as Israel’s prime minister a year ago by an alliance of political foes and now embroiled in a corruption trial (he denies all charges), one might have thought the 73-year-old’s career was up. 

The Cop27 climate talks got under way in Egypt, as debate raged over the agenda as well as a furore over hosting the event in a country where political and human rights are a live issue. Environment editor Fiona Harvey explains what the talks – which run until 18 November – can hope to achieve, amid a slew of alarming reports about the rate of global heating.

This week’s magazine went to press too soon to feature news of the US midterm elections – there’ll be plenty on that in the next edition. In the meantime, Leyland Cecco reports from Canada, where there are claims China is operating a chain of clandestine police stations to keep tabs on its diaspora.

Covers: New York Times Magazine – Sept 25, 2022

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SIX PHOTOGRAPHERS JOURNEY AROUND THE WORLD IN SEARCH OF ANIMAL ENCOUNTERS.

Horses that resemble My Little Ponies (but on Mars). Caimans that eat pythons. Monkeys that live alongside these caimans. High-fiving raccoons. Searching for a snow leopard. Six photographers. Six stories of animal encounters.

THE VOYAGES ISSUE
Gareth McConnell for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueSearching for Wild Animals, Across the WorldFor the magazine’s Voyages Issue, six photographers in pursuit of animal encounters.By The New York Times Magazine
Matthew Pillsbury for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueLessons From a Lifetime of Animal VoyagesThere is an animal-size hole at the center of modern life. Some of us will search the world to fill it.By Sam Anderson
Robin Schwartz for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueInside Seoul’s Wild Animal CafesArctic foxes. Sheep. Raccoons. See them before they’re gone.Photographs by Robin Schwartz
Antoine d’Agata/Magnum, for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueMeeting the Beasts of the Jungle in French GuianaAfter two years without human visitors, the monkeys were restless.Photographs by Antoine d’Agata
Yael Martínez/Magnum, for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueInside an Animal Sanctuary in Bolivia Where Tourists Can HelpPlaces like Senda Verde, a refuge in the tropical Andes, offer an alternative to cruises and safaris.Photographs by Yael Martínez
Gareth McConnell for The New York TimesThe Voyages IssueThe Fantastical Beauty of Icelandic HorsesThese stout little creatures look like My Little Ponies on Mars. The photographer Gareth McConnell had to see for himself.Photographs by Gareth McConnell

Read the Voyages Issue here. https://nyti.ms/3C2WvCo

Preview: The Atlantic Magazine – October 2022

The Atlantic October 2022 Issue:

Ukraine defiant: George Packer, Anne Applebaum, and Franklin Foer on democracy’s front lines. Plus the myopia generation, the Benin bronzes’ contested return, Ian McEwan’s anti-memoir, cursive’s demise, redshirting boys, John Roberts v. the Voting Rights Act, the GOP’s extremist history, and more.

Six months into Ukraine’s defiant stand against Russia’s invasion, The Atlantic is publishing a special cover package devoted to life in the country and the state of the war, with new, on-the-ground reporting by staff writers George Packer, Anne Applebaum, and Franklin Foer. Packer, Applebaum, and Foer are three of the most influential and established voices on the perils of war, authoritarian threats to democracy, and Ukrainian and Russian politics.

Plant-Based Meat: Why It Hasn’t Gone Mainstream

As people’s eating habits change and environmental concerns grow, plant-based protein used as a meat substitute has gained popularity. However, some barriers are preventing it from becoming truly mainstream. Watch what needs to be done to truly realize a future with less meat.