Tag Archives: Cotswolds

Video Profiles: London Architect Richard Found In His Cotswold Retreat

When designer Richard Found discovered the dream plot on which to build his serene contemporary retreat overlooking a lake, he didn’t bet on what happened next. In the grounds stood a derelict 18th-century gamekeeper’s cottage, which was immediately spot-listed by Historic England. “It changed the whole dynamic of what I thought would be a straightforward new-build project, and became a far more arduous planning exercise.”…

House Proud is a series of videos created by the Telegraph which showcase some of Britain’s most idiosyncratic, quirky, unusual and unforgettable homes. A celebration of British eccentricity and imagination, in each film the owner gives us an intimate guided tour and tells us the story of their unique property.

Richard Found's Radical Retreat Gloucestershire England The Telegraphy Video January 16 2020

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Top New Nature Books: “Turning The Boat For Home” By Richard Mabey

From a Cotswold Life online interview/review:

Turning The Boat For Home Richard Mabey cover“I suppose I started off with a fairly literal view of the world,” he says. “But, quite early on, it became clear to me that there was much more going on than simply the picture I was seeing; that the natural world had an agenda of its own; that it was going to live out life, regardless of how we viewed it and how we used it; and, indeed, regardless of the fancy metaphors that we used.”

Oh my goodness. Where to begin?

I could start with the ‘Praying Beech’ – a tree whose (‘whose’? The human possessive feels simultaneously wrong and yet just right) two branch stubs clasped each other like hands. Once, when the rain fell in an apocalyptic burst, Richard Mabey watched its bark melt in front of his eyes. It was, of course, no stranger to extremes of weather: one summer past, the tree had been split by lightning, bees hunkering down in its newly-created hollows. Sometime later, a storm had toppled it, leaving fungi free to colonise its delicious surfaces: knobbly coral spots; dead man’s fingers rising corpse-like from the tree’s own rot; white porcelain tufts, like Royal Worcester plates awaiting a delicate slice of egg-yellow sponge.

To read more: https://www.cotswoldlife.co.uk/people/interview-with-nature-writer-richard-mabey-1-6357450?utm_medium=email&utm_source=eshot&utm_campaign=newsletterlinknewtemplate

Top Pubs In The Cotswolds: The Mousetrap Inn, Bourton-On-The-Water

A very popular locals destination. The Mousetrap Inn had most tables reserved or occupied as we walked in Friday night at 6 pm.

The bartender was very friendly and seated us at one of the few available tables.

He quickly recommended the Roast Cauliflower with Chickpeas, dill, raisins and smoked almonds as a vegetarian entree selection. He then suggested two drinks: The Mousetrap house specialty, a Cotswold Dry Gin and soda drink with a unique long ice cube of lemons, cucumber, mint and bitters) along with a twin scotch Old Fashioned. Excellent.

Very unique food, drinks and atmosphere. A must visit.

Crossing The Cotswolds: To Blenheim And Broadway And Back

A brisk 2.9 mile walk (yes, 2.9 miles) in mildly drizzly weather from The Swan Hotel door back to the breakfast room set up a perfect day.

Drove to Blenheim Palace and arrived at the 10:00 am opening time. Gorgeous grounds and gated entrance.

Famed Italian Artist Mauricio Cattelan was featured throughout the Palace and grounds which added to the spectacle.

We entered the palace at 10:30 and were swept up in an amazing tour of the Duke of Marlborough’s residence.

The audio tour was very informative and kept your interest in every room.

Cattelan’s very humorous exhibits were meant to convey the very accidental and interactive nature life and art, with the aim of softening the imposing feel of the castle. Amazing.

The Winston Churchill exhibits at the end were spectacular in breadth and scope.

We left at 1:00 and drove to Broadway and a walk of the very polished town, full of art galleries, custom shops and elite hotels.

A great sandwich and salad at a deli on the Main Street was followed by a drive to the Broadway Tower.

We headed back to Bibury and a glass of Rose in the small park in front of The Swan Hotel.

Driving The Cotswolds: Up To Stow-On-The-Wold, Bourton-On-The-Water & Bibury

Left The Painswick after a fine British breakfast (highlighted by fabulous, freshly made crumpets and a berry compote), we drove into a heavy rain toward Cirencester and the on to Bibury for a 3-night stay at The Swan Hotel.

The rain let up a bit so a walk of the village after checking in was next.

The rain resumed so we ducked into the Bibury Trout Farm cafe for a bottle of Rose wine and baked trout (directly across from The Swan.

Road trip time at 1:30 and a trip to Burford, “Gateway to the Cotswolds”.

Forbes has Burford listed as #6 best place to live in Europe.

The next stop was Stow-On-The-Wold, an ancient tub dating back to the Stone Age.

The finest brownie in the world (layered peanut butter, chocolate fudge) was waiting for us at Huffkins Bakery. That and an iced coffee is worth a flight to London and the drive to Stow.

A quick pull at The Porch House, which claims to be the oldest pub in England (dating to 947 AD), was an experience with beams that bang foreheads at 5’10”.

Bourton-On-The-Water was next up on the way back to Bibury.

A ten mile trip back to The Swan was directed through rolling countryside by the GPS. Lovely.

Into The Cotswolds: From The Roman Baths North To Painswick

A quiet night’s sleep was followed by a sumptuous breakfast downstairs at The Bird.

After checking out, we left bags in the car and walked into Bath via the Pulteney Bridge.

The Roman Baths site opened at 9 am today (Monday) and we took the self-guided tour with headset. It did not disappoint.

This is the finest example of a Roman Bath in the world and established Bath as a destination to visit from all over the Roman and Mediterranean world.

We then walked through the town and boarded a double deck bus to tour the rest of the city.

We left Bath and headed north into the Cotswolds. First stop was a quaint village called Castle Combe.

Lunch followed at The Salutation Inn, a pub just up the road.

The Finger Fish and BLT sandwiches on dark bread were amazing.

The final destination was Painswick where we were booked for the night at The Painswick, the 2016 Hotel of the Year in England as voted by The Telegraph in London. We arrived in a slight rain and found fires going downstairs and upstairs.

We finished with dinner in the hotel dining room. Order the Grouse with a Negroni.