Tag Archives: Architects

Island View: ‘Villa Mandra – Mykonos Island, Greece’

Sitting on the ridge of the hill of Aleomandra in Mykonos yet almost entirely hidden from view, Villa Mandra looks straight out to sea and the sunset over the neighbouring island of Delos. A 6-bedroom holiday house built for a young, dynamic couple to enjoy with their family and friends, it celebrates its spectacular view from a grounded viewpoint blended into a sensitively landscaped, stone-walled garden that screens it from the road behind.

The house is built upon the idea of slow, laid-back summer living, and encourages mindful connection with family, friends and the freedom to exist peacefully in nature. Form follows emotion rather than function, as every space becomes another opportunity for rest, reflection and exploration.

Architectural Views: ‘The Seagram Building’ By Mies Van Der Rohe (NYC, 1956)

The Seagram Building is a skyscraper at 375 Park Avenue, between 52nd and 53rd Streets, in Midtown Manhattan, New York City. The building, completed in 1958, stands 515 feet tall with 38 stories and a large plaza. 

Ludwig Mies van der Rohe was a German-American architect. He was commonly referred to as Mies, his surname. Along with Alvar Aalto, Le Corbusier, Walter Gropius and Frank Lloyd Wright, he is regarded as one of the pioneers of modernist architecture.

Home Views: ‘Windsor House’ – Paddington, Australia (Video Tour)

Sydney architects Tom Mark Henry adapted this terrace house in the inner-city suburb of Paddington to cater to the modern lives of a family of five. Dubbed Windsor House, the terrace house was built in the 1970s and had existing features the architects wanted to preserve, including a unique street presence, a central staircase and an open floor plan.

Aside from creating physical connections between this split-level terrace house, the stair also brings light into its centre. Tom Mark Henry restructured the basement to create space for a steam room, powder room, laundry and entertainment suite and extended the stair to connect to this new level.

The kitchen was then moved from one side of the house to the other to create an easy entertaining area that connects to the rear courtyard through 3m-high steel framed doors and also connects to the new lower level. The kitchen is at the heart of this terrace house and features a full suite of Fisher & Paykel appliances, chosen for their ease of use and streamlined aesthetic. The interior design is contemporary but in keeping with the original style of the exterior architecture, with a material palette that includes rendered walls, v-groove ceilings, timber joinery, limestone flooring, and ribbed glass to visually connect spaces.

The homeowners wanted to be able to live comfortably in the house and the furniture chosen is both contemporary and cosy. Windsor House is a modern terrace house that is family friendly and stylish.

Interior Architecture by Tom Mark Henry. Kitchen Appliances by Fisher & Paykel. Photography by Pablo Veiga. Styling by Atelier Lab. Build by CBD Remedial Construction. Kitchen Joinery by Original Kitchens. Soft Furnishings by Simple Studio. Filmed and Edited by Cheer Squad Film Co. Production by The Local Project.

Architecture: ‘M+ Museum Hong Kong’ By Herzog & De Meuron (2021-Video)

M+ has completed the construction of its museum building, which is set to open to the public at the end of 2021. designed by herzog & de meuron in partnership with TFP farrells and arup, the landmark building is seeking to become a new addition to the global arts and cultural landscape. located in hong kong’s west kowloon cultural district on the victoria harbour waterfront, it provides a permanent space for M+ — the first global museum of contemporary visual culture in asia dedicated to collecting, exhibiting, and interpreting visual art, design and architecture, moving image, and hong kong visual culture of the 20th and 21st centuries.

Read more at DesignBoom

Architectural History: ‘Frank Lloyd Wright – The Imperial Hotel’ (Video)

Frank Lloyd Wright: The Lost Works explores some of Wright’s most important demolished and unrealized structures. The project brings these lost buildings to life through immersive digital animations reconstructed from Wright’s original plans and drawings, along with archival photographs.

Two years in the making and based on a Japanese publication of original plans and historical photos, Frank Lloyd Wright: The Lost Works – The Imperial Hotel is a comprehensive digitally-animated recreation of the exterior (Part I) and interior (Part II) of this masterpiece.

Learn more about the Frank Lloyd Wright Trust: https://flwright.org

Architectural Home Tour: A Converted Warehouse, Melbourne, Australia (4K)

An architect’s own home can be a challenge to design, with no brief or boundaries to adhere to, leaving the architect’s skill set and true style exposed for all to see. This converted warehouse is an architect’s own home, designed by and for Rob Mills of Rob Mills Architecture and Interior Design.

Located in Armadale, a Melbourne suburb known for its character and village atmosphere, the house was created through a warehouse conversion, which gave the architect plenty of scope and space to design a piece of architecture that truly reflected his likes and wishes. Harnessing this space in the converted warehouse home, the house carries over three levels, with an apartment, sauna and garage at ground level, living in the middle, and bedrooms above.

The interior design uses a minimal palette of stone, timber, stucco, glass and metal, with brass playing a large part in the design, especially in the kitchen where it is used extensively and effectively. This glamour and drama are at the heart of the interior design of the converted warehouse. A spiral staircase adds a sculptural element to the house, while also providing an efficient method of travelling between floors.

The office, which has an English aesthetic with lush yet classic-style furniture, features timber shutters that close off to create a focused environment or open to let in plenty of natural daylight. Close connections to nature were important to the architect, Rob Mills of Rob Mills Architecture and Interior Design. A water feature trickles through the living space of the converted warehouse, providing a meditative element to the room. Materials were chosen for their non-toxicity, with stucco walls specified as a natural alternative to paint.

An architect’s own converted warehouse home, Armadale Residence features designer furniture throughout that is carefully chosen to subtly fit with the shine and glamour of the materials. Architecture and Interior Design by Rob Mills Architecture and Interior Design. Filmed and Edited by Cheer Squad Film Co. Production by The Local Project.

Architecture & Design: ‘Ruum Model’ – Australia

The Ruum model proudly represents a new pathway to architect designed living. Through considered partnerships with industry leading companies such as Chamberlain Architects and Fisher & Paykel, Ruum is making architectural designs accessible to more people.

Captured in a recently completed home designed by Chamberlain Architects, Ruum founder Elliot McLaren and Chamberlain director Glen Chamberlain explain what this new pathway to architect designed living represents, and how Ruum is able to maximise value for the home-owner. As Elliot explains, “having spent over 15 years in the residential building industry, I became acutely aware of a chasm in the marketplace where traditional project building will stop and one off bespoke architecture starts.”

In practice this has seen Ruum partnering with Chamberlain Architects on the first series of Ruum architect designed homes – five different configurations that can only be commissioned ten times per state before they are retired. Within this program, there exists the potential for customisation of each template to maximise the living and lifestyle benefits of Ruum’s offering. It allows home-owners a degree of customisation to their layout, whilst achieving efficiencies in the appointments and appliances throughout their home.

For Glen Chamberlain, this meant that “the attention to the plan” and choosing to partner with “companies that have a passion and commitment to design” were of utmost importance in elevating this new pathway to architect designed living. The decision to align Ruum with Fisher & Paykel was therefore a logical choice, with all Ruum homes enjoying integrated Fisher & Paykel kitchens that become extensions of the main living space. Elliot elaborates that “what is a common theme with all the partnerships that we have curated within the Ruum model is a common belief around quality” and this is nowhere more apparent than in the Ruum kitchens.

Demonstrating a new path for architect designed living, Ruum allows clients to create beautiful and architectural spaces without the rigours of the traditional model. Presented in Partnership with Ruum. Architecture by Chamberlain Architects. Kitchen Appliances by Fisher & Paykel. Filmed by Cheer Squad Film Co. Production by The Local Project.

Views: ‘S&P House’, Temple View, New Zealand (Video)

Around 15 minutes south-west of Hamilton CBD lies the rural suburb of Temple View, established in the 1950s and home to the Taitua Arboretum—a 20-hectare garden comprising woodlands, lakes and open pasture. It was within this bucolic idyll that husband and wife, Noel and Kylie Jessop, found a hilly, 6500m2 block offering wide-ranging views back towards the city, on which to build their family home. “The position is spot on and the views are amazing,” says architectural designer, Noel. The couple bought the site in mid-2018 and spent the next year fine-tuning the design of their home. “There was no real rush to complete the project at that time and so we had the luxury of really working through ideas and discussing what we required as a family of six—as well as what the site would allow, given its topography. “Kylie said from day one that it needed to be light and bright with an open flow and easy access to the outdoors, especially from the ensuite. We had stayed at a resort where the ensuite led straight out onto the pool area and Kylie was keen to replicate that feel.” Noel says it also needed to have a high level of functionality with six people living in the house. There is a mix of individual spaces and communal spaces and an ever-present connection to the outdoors, even upstairs where the only interaction is via the view through the windows, there is still a sense of being in the landscape. “The secret to successfully fulfilling the functional, financial and aesthetic parameters of the project was to keep the form really simple; just one room wide and to do away with extraneous spaces such as corridors. “There is a simplicity to the home, in terms of its layout and construction, that gives it a sense of timelessness—it functions perfectly as a family home and will function perfectly, years from now, when it’s just Kylie and I living here.” Click here to see the full project: https://archipro.co.nz/project/s-and-…

Books: ‘The Notebooks And Drawings Of Louis I. Kahn’ To Be Republished

Originally published in 1962 and out of print for almost 50 years, The Notebooks and Drawings of Louis I. Kahn was the first book on influential 20th-century American architect Louis Kahn to feature his own images and words— and the first to capture the modern master’s powerful and unique spirit.  

Website

Architecture: ‘Louis Sullivan – Invention Of The Skyscraper’ In 1897

Louis Sullivan, Bayard-Condict Building, 1897–99 (65 Bleecker Street, NYC), a Seeing America video speakers: Dr. Matthew A. Postal and Dr. Steven Zucker.

Louis Henry Sullivan was an Irish-American architect, and has been called a “father of skyscrapers” and “father of modernism”. He was an influential architect of the Chicago School, a mentor to Frank Lloyd Wright, and an inspiration to the Chicago group of architects who have come to be known as the Prairie School.

The Bayard–Condict Building at 65 Bleecker Street between Broadway and Lafayette Street, at the head of Crosby Street in the NoHo neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City is the only work of architect Louis Sullivan in New York City.