Tag Archives: Architects

Tours: Cliffhanger House In Toowoomba, Australia

Evoking grandiosity through carefully considered sharp points and rounded edges, the concrete super house by Joe Adsett Architects offers unrivalled views of Toowoomba’s sweeping landscape. Creating a piece of architecture that was befitting of the location and striking natural landscape,

Video timeline: 00:00 – A Welcome to Cliffhanger House 00:36 – The Location of the Super House 00:46 – Building On The Edge of A Landslide Zone 01:36 – Arriving At The Site 02:00 – The Vitrocsa Glazing Suite 02:40 – A Seamless Flow From Kitchen to Outdoors 03:00 – An Extension of The Main Living Area 03:14 – The Material Palette 03:52 – Emulating The Architecture Through Furniture 04:17 – Designing Weather Flexible Houses 04:41 – The Challenging Aspect of The Cantilever

Vitrocsa collaborated with Joe Adsett Architects to produce the concrete super house that fully embraced its location. Balancing at the very top of the site, the concrete super house offers views from East of Brisbane toward Picnic Point and Table Top Mountain. Whilst the home’s location is situated over a ridge, Joe Adsett Architects endeavoured to create more space by cantilevering away from the slope.

By projecting part of the concrete super house out from the built space, the ability to create a more functional living space with privacy from surrounding neighbours arose. Arriving at the concrete super house, the gaze is immediately ensnared by the curving concrete wall that cantilevers away from the base of the home. With the garage underneath the house offering one way of entrance, it is the curved pathway leading to the deliberately oversized glass pivot door that is the striking entrance of the home.

Working with Vitrocsa to create the glazing for the home, the frame of the windows was done with a slender aluminium product comprised of reinforced stainless steel. Made in Australia and designed to Swiss specifications, the framing offers unbroken views of the surrounding landscape whilst also bringing a seamless indoor-outdoor flow into the home. With restrained materials used across the exterior architecture, the interior design choices also reflect the primary theme of the concrete super house.

Softened with veneered timber products and large porcelain tiles, curves and sharp points are repeated through the joinery elements. Furthermore, the furnishings also introduce soft textures and colours that bring a humanising element to the concrete super house.

Architecture: Wallaroo Residence Tour, Canberra

In touch with a vast rural landscape, Wallaroo Residence rises from atop one of Canberra’s many slopes. Crafted by DNA Architects, the modern farmhouse gently weaves natural elements into its modern expression, emerging as a place of retreat.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to theModern Farmhouse 00:35 – Hitting The Brief 01:10 – A Walkthrough of the House 01:47 – The Key Architectural Features 02:23 – Navigating The Weather Elements 02:44 – Separation Between The Family and The Entertaining Areas 02:55 – The Contemporary Kitchen 03:41 – A Focus On Sustainability 04:24 – The Modern Farmhouse Aesthetic 04:52 – The Architects Favourite Part of The Home

Settled on the edge of Canberra, Wallaroo Residence follows a design brief readily assigned to DNA Architects. The luxury home presents as a modern farmhouse, a concept first proposed by its traditional pitched roof and then explored within an interior of considered materials maturely applied. Aggrandising the entrance of the modern farmhouse, a floating porte-cochère leads on to an impressive set of glass doors. Internally, a timber-clad kitchen sits to the east of the arrival space, beyond which lies the family living room.

From there, the residence separates into the laundry room and master suite which offers unobstructed southern views. Along the back wall of the kitchen, Fisher & Paykel DishDrawers are effortlessly integrated into both the wall itself and the adorning joinery. On the kitchen island, a Full Surface Fisher & Paykel Induction Hob satisfies the desire for sustainable living and enables multiple pans to be warmed at once.

In the laundry room, large capacity Fisher & Paykel Washer Dryers inject a sense of efficiency into the modern farmhouse. Embracing its unique perspective, Wallaroo Residence testifies to the ongoing appeal of a city escape. With inhered functionality and a contemporary aesthetic, the modern farmhouse represents a distinguished interpretation of rural luxury.

Design: Dovecote House In Gerringong, Australia

In an area where expansive views can quickly overwhelm, Dovecote by Atelier Andy Carson is settled comfortably within the landscape. Comprised of The Headland and The Range, the award winning Airbnb pulls the surrounds into balance with its materiality and interior design.

Video timeline: 00:00 – The Local Project’s Print Publication 00:21 – Introduction to Dovecote 01:00 – Andy Carson – The Architect 01:29 – A Detailed Brief 02:17 – Finding Longevity in The Material Selection 02:54 – The Inspiration for The Headland 03:34 – A Walkthrough The Headland 04:13 – The Original Use for The Courtyard 04:32 – Approaching The Views 05:03 – The Inspiration for The Range 05:52 – Celebrating The Western View 06:20 – Immersion In The Landscape 07:04 – The Architects Favourite Aspects 07:31 – Subscribe to The Local Project’s Print Publication

Positioned alone in the South Coast town of Gerringong, Dovecote is butted by lush rolling hills that slope down towards the shoreline. A house tour of the award winning Airbnb reveals that it embodies a detailed design brief which stipulated a contemporary main house – The Headland – visually countered by a simpler construction, The Range. A built reaction to place,

Dovecote is designed to thrive in a harsh coastal climate. The material palette is tailored to robust functionality – metal cladding maintains its structural integrity under salty ocean spray and allows the award winning Airbnb to visually recede into the shadows of the hills. In The Range, copper louvres to the western side enable residents to control access to natural light and views of the farmland.

Decks are placed to the north and south so that on any given day, visitors to the award winning Airbnb can use the architecture of The Range as a windbreak or utilise passive solar power. Through the concealment, introduction and reintroduction of striking vistas, Dovecote preserves the special qualities of its site. Atelier Andy Carson expertly controls the influence of the natural surrounds, ensuring that the award winning Airbnb is as liveable as it is showstopping.

Architectural Tours: A Weekend ‘Floating House’ In Waccabuc, New York

Today AD welcomes architects Denise Ferris and Chan-li Lin for an in-depth look at their self-designed weekend home, a marriage of structural engineering and artistic expression that appears to float effortlessly above the ground.

French Architecture: La Tête Carrée Library In Nice

Approached to design the new municipal office in Nice, architect Sasha Sosno had a clear vision: a giant building shaped like the bust of a man with a solid box for a head. How to actually build it would require a brilliant blend of architectural innovation and improvisation.

La Tête Carrée Library, is a massive sculpture that stands at a staggering 85ft (or 28m) in height and was designed by French artist Sacha Sosno and made by two architects – Francis Chapus and Yves Bayard – for the Central Library in Nice. Entitled “Thinking Inside the Box,” the work is an accusatory and clear metaphor and hasn’t always been the most beloved work in the city, with locals often citing it as “ugly”. However, in spite of this, the building remains a fascinating tourist attraction and extraordinary structure, housing four storeys of offices and three storeys of book shelves.

Sosno, a sculptor and peer of other famous local artists such as Henri Matisse and Yves Klein, had long held hope to build such an unusual construction-sculpture but only got a chance to do so in 1997 when his idea was chosen for an administrative office of Louis Nucéra Library. Inaugurated in 2002, it was the first inhabited monumental sculpture in the world.

Located on the corner of Promenade des Arts, La Tête Carrée looks out over Place Yves Klein from the Jardin Maréchal Juin, a small public garden full of colourful flowers and a few more (albeit far, far smaller) sculptures. During the day, it simply looks like a massive sculpture of a head but, if you’re passing La Tête Carrée at night, it is lit from within by a lighting scheme devised by French light artist Yann Kersalé and you can make out the floors of the library inside.

Design: ‘D_Residence’ In Scarborough, Australia

Complementing an established art collection, D_Residence is a modern home with an open interiority. Crafted by Carrier and Postmus Architects (CAPA), the serene residence represents a unique approach to interior design and architecture. Located in the maritime suburb of Scarborough in Western Australia,

00:00 – Introduction to D_Residence 00:32 – Behind The Name D_Residence 01:00 – Taking A Journey with Landscaping 01:41 – The Street Presence of the Modern Home 01:57 – The Endemic Landscape Character 02:20 – Separating Interior Design from Exterior Architecture 02:40 – Venturing Through D_Residence 03:03 – Concrete and Brickwork 03:46 – The Range from Brickworks and Austral Bricks 04:11 – Favourite Aspects of the Modern Homes and Proud Moments

D_Residence is named in reference to the nearby sand dunes. A house tour of the modern home begins at its façade, where lush greenery is positioned as a natural barrier between the home and the harsh wind. Utilising light and dark-toned brickwork from Austral Bricks at Brickworks, CAPA gently defines the modern home. Applied at the garage, basement level and entry, the dark-toned brickwork causes the practical amenities to visually recede and create an intimate arrival experience.

Combining with the blockwork which comprises the remainder of the façade, the bricks form a textural backdrop to the initial greenery. As the builder’s chosen medium, concrete is also featured in the modern home, offering a neutral complement to the owners’ art collection. Aesthetically flexible, D_Residence testifies to the impressive design restraint of CAPA. Ultimately determined by the influence of its occupants, the modern home welcomes personal injections of colour, texture and vibrancy.

Architect’s Tour: Casa Mia In City Beach, Australia

Offering a playful rendition of the familiar sustainable narrative, Casa Mia enables residents to experience life inside a dream house. Crafted by Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects in collaboration with Caroline Di Costa Architect, the residence uses brickwork to convey a liberating message.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to Casa Mia 00:28 – High-Density Living 01:11 – A Playful Space 01:53 – Providing a Presence and Privacy 02:13 – Sustainable Brickwork 03:08 – Love and Appreciation for Brickworks 03:39 – Historic and Ancient Japanese Architecture 04:25 – Utilising Unfinished Materials 05:00 – Sustainable Design 05:47 – The Architect’s Favourite Aspects of the House

Located on the Ocean Mia Estate in City Beach, Casa Mia is an architect’s own home, sitting in contrast to the built context. Constructed from carefully positioned brickwork with spaces between bricks at its edge, the dream house juxtaposes the rectilinear forms of the surrounding buildings, presenting a dynamic profile of surprising lightness.

Liaising with Brickworks, Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects both inheres the project with a sense of sustainability and makes the concept legible as a prominent feature of the architect’s own home. Brickworks enables its products to be applied to the dream house in their uncut state – an atypical usage – in order to minimise waste. Every brick of the dream house is locally sourced and exhibits colours reminiscent of the earthy natural landscape. Inspired by Japanese architecture, Iredale Pedersen Hook Architects employs fully-glazed bricks around particular openings.

The bricks bounce sunlight into the depths of the home, allowing the residents to save energy where possible. Although Casa Mia represents the weight of responsibility architects have towards the environment, it also presents this responsibility as beneficial. Iredale Pederson Hook Architects and Caroline Di Costa Architect craft a dream house that rejoices in its sustainability, utilising the colour and texture of brick to suggest a playful variation of an architect’s own home.

Architecture: ‘Plateau Residence’ By Michael Hennessey Architects

MICHAEL HENNESSEY ARCHITECTURE

Plateau Residence

The severe topography and the intense climatic conditions at the site are the two primary factors that influence the design of this single-family residence. The building is situated on a plateau located above a steep, ambitious climb. The massing of the building is kept low to the ground to respect the existing topography below the plateau and to create a direct connection between the interior spaces and the surrounding landscape.

The site experiences relatively severe temperature swings from winter to summer. As a means to mediate a proper climatic response, a strategy is developed to relate the massing and fenestration specifically to the function of the public and private spaces of the residence. The public living spaces are defined with an abundance of glazing that is shaded with deep overhangs, horizontal slats, and vertical fins. Conversely, the private bedroom and bathroom spaces are shielded from the hot afternoon sun by stone walls.

Art & Architecture: The ‘Ex Of In House’ In New York

Today Architectural Digest brings you two hours north of New York City to Rhinebeck, NY for an in-depth look at a home that feels like an inhabitable work of art. Architects Steven Holl and Dimitra Tsachrelia explain the design philosophy and inspiration behind their secluded, off-grid “architectural wonder in the woods,” breaking down the intent behind each design choice and how they work together to create a uniquely meditative but stimulating space.

Architecture: Water-Themed ‘Zig Zag House’ In Kensington, Australia

Designed by Stukel Architecture in collaboration with AJP Constructions, Zig Zag House makes waves as a contemporary house in an environment dominated by traditional cottages. Named after its distinctively dynamic architecture, the home is a sculptural response to its Kensington site.

Timeline: 00:00 – Introduction to the Contemporary House 00:49 – The Relationship between Architect and Builder 01:14 – The Client Brief 01:48 – The Unique Ceiling Form 02:52 – Building the Roof 03:24 – The Stairs 04:10 – Unique Use of Materials 05:17 – Concrete Finishes 06:13 – The Architects Favourite Part of the House

As a contemporary house, the architecture of the home reflects the movement of water, paying homage to the waterway that cuts through the landscape connecting Centennial Park and Botany Bay. Architecturally, the contemporary house is both impressive and bold. An overhang to the west orientation internally defines the home’s lounge, kitchen and dining spaces whilst a large blade column – inserted into the stairs – provides a solid focal point within a generous open space.

The interior design of Zig Zag House sees typical materials elevated through considered treatment. A seamless quality is inhered in the venetian plaster blade column, while a concrete wall is marked to elegantly resemble a particular grain of timber. The treatment of each material brings to the surface subtle aesthetic qualities, establishing the home as a contemporary house.

Located in the Sydney suburb of Kensington, Zig Zag House introduces 21st century architecture into the urban milieu. Visualised by Stukel Architecture and skilfully executed by AJP Constructions, Zig Zag House stands as a contemporary house that testifies to a successful design collaboration.