Tag Archives: Architects

Architecture: ‘Inside-Out House’ In Westminster, UK

Architect Barbara Weiss likes to do things a little differently. Indeed, the last time we caught up with her was at her upside-down house: a converted pub in Westminster, central London, where she lives on the secluded top floors and sleeps on the lower floors (yes, it’s as brilliant as it sounds). This time, she’s giving us a tour of her latest self-designed home, which she’s aptly titled the inside-out house.

Scottish Country Houses: 18th C. ‘Wedderburn Castle’ In Berwickshire

Wedderburn Castle, Berwickshire, is one of Robert Adam’s less familiar commissions — yet just as extraordinary as many of his more famous buildings. Recently rescued from neglect by owners David Home Miller and Catherine Macdonald-Home, it has a fascinating story to tell about the development of his castle style.

Roger White, September 5, 2021

The ‘castle style’ of the Georgian era might be said to have been invented by Vanbrugh, who aimed to give ‘something of the castle air’ with his additions to Kimbolton Castle, Huntingdonshire, in 1707–10 .

In practice, that amounted to little more than a battlemented parapet applied to a completely symmetrical building. In the late 18th century, the architect Robert Adam was undoubtedly influenced by Vanbrugh, whose mastery of what he called ‘movement’ in architectural composition — ‘the rise and fall, the advance and recess with other diversity of form, in the different parts of a building’ — he admired (although he deplored the Baroque master’s ‘barbarisms and absurdities’).

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Books: ‘Contemporary Japanese Architecture’

The contemporary architecture of Japan has long been among the most inventive in the world, recognized for sustainability and infinite creativity. No fewer than seven Japanese architects have won the Pritzker Prize.

TASCHEN

Since Osaka World Expo ’70 brought contemporary forms center stage, Japan has been a key player in global architecture. With his intentionally limited vocabulary of geometric forms, Tadao Ando has since then put Japanese building on the world’s cultural map, establishing a bridge between East and West. In the wake of Ando’s mostly concrete buildings, figures like Kengo Kuma (Japan National Stadium intended for the Olympic Games, originally planned for 2020), Shigeru Ban (Mount Fuji World Heritage Center), and Kazuyo Sejima (Kanazawa Museum of 21st Century Art of Contemporary Art) pioneered a more sustainable approach. Younger generations have successfully developed new directions in Japanese architecture that are in harmony with nature and connected to traditional building. Rather than planning on the drawing board, the architects presented in this collection stand out for their endless search for forms, truly reacting on their environment.

Presenting the latest in Japanese building, this book reveals how this unique creativity is a fruit of Japan’s very particular situation that includes high population density, a modern, efficient economy, a long history, and the continual presence of disasters in the form of earthquakes. Accepting ambiguity, as seen in the evanescent reflections of Sejima’s Kanazawa Museum, or constant change and the threat of catastrophe is a key to understanding what makes Japanese architecture different from that of Europe or America.

This XL-sized book highlights 39 architects and 55 exceptional projects by Japanese masters—from Tadao Ando’s Shanghai Poly Theater, Shigeru Ban’s concert hall La Seine Musical, SANAA’S Grace Farms, Fumihiko Maki’s 4 World Trade Center, to Takashi Suo’s much smaller sustainable dental clinic. Each project is introduced with photos, original floor plans and technical drawings, as well as insightful descriptions and brief biographies. An elaborate essay traces the country’s building scene from the Metabolists to today and shows how the interaction of past, present, and future has earned contemporary Japanese architecture worldwide recognition.

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Design: ‘Cocoon Cottage’ In New York By Architect Nina Edwards Anker

After earning her doctorate at the Oslo School of Architecture and Design and working in Norway’s capital as a teacher and research fellow, architect Nina Edwards Anker came home to the U.S. with a refreshed perspective on environmental sensitivity. When the opportunity arose to build an eco-cottage on family land in Southampton, Long Island, Edwards Anker’s thought experiments resulted in a 1,738-square-foot vacation home completed in 2017, made striking for the combination of curved, shingle-clad walls that meet planes of glass, with some cast in bright, unexpected color.

Architectural Tour: Casa Voluta, Lagos, Portugal

The film portrays a day at ‘Casa Voluta’ by the architect Mário Martins. This house was built by Nobislux, and the film also shows its strong relationship with the exterior space and the landscape.

arquitectura/architecture: Mário Martins Atelier construção/construction: Nobislux filme/film: Building Pictures dirigido por/directed by: Sara Nunes câmara/camera: Sara Nunes edição/edition: Sara Nunes sonoplastia/sound design: André Cardoso

Design: Portage Bay Float Home, Lake Union, Seattle

“We wanted the interior to act as a canvas for natural light and convey an overall appearance of lightness…”

Stainless steel counters, aluminum lightwells, and whitewashed pine walls and ceilings help create a feeling of lightness—perfectly suited for a floating home on water. 

Following a long tradition of floating homes in Seattle, the dwelling is located on the north end of Lake Union, in a spot called Portage Bay.

It was built on top of a log-float foundation dating to the early 1900s. The home sits close to the shore and has access to a garden.

Read more at Dezeen.com

Architecture: A Mountain Chalet Near Lake Tahoe, Northern California

After vacationing in the Sierra Nevada near Donner Summit for years, architects Sherry Scott and John Kosich built their 1,900-square-foot concrete, wood, and stone home in the mountains of California near Lake Tahoe. Home owners Sherry and John discuss the environmental and construction challenges of their part-time home. Read the story here: https://www.dwell.com/article/modern-…

Modern Architecture: ‘Glass & Steel House’ – Malibu, California (Video)

Designed by architect Ed Niles, this four bedroom, four bathroom home sits on two private acres overlooking the Pacific and is currently listed for sale at $13.5 Million.

Home Tours: A Tribeca, New York City Penthouse With Top Design Architect

We’re in Tribeca at another distinct addition to the New York City skyline – the one that has come to be known a the Jenga building – for obvious reasons. We’re inside one of the penthouses with architect Denis Schofield who created a warm yet unique home against the backdrop of some of the best views of the city you’ll ever see.

Island View: ‘Villa Mandra – Mykonos Island, Greece’

Sitting on the ridge of the hill of Aleomandra in Mykonos yet almost entirely hidden from view, Villa Mandra looks straight out to sea and the sunset over the neighbouring island of Delos. A 6-bedroom holiday house built for a young, dynamic couple to enjoy with their family and friends, it celebrates its spectacular view from a grounded viewpoint blended into a sensitively landscaped, stone-walled garden that screens it from the road behind.

The house is built upon the idea of slow, laid-back summer living, and encourages mindful connection with family, friends and the freedom to exist peacefully in nature. Form follows emotion rather than function, as every space becomes another opportunity for rest, reflection and exploration.