Tag Archives: Dezeen

Top Innovation & Design: ‘Sunne’ – Indoor Window Solar Lamp (Video)

Dutch designer Marjan van Aubel has developed a solar lamp that is designed to be hung in front of windows so it can generate its own energy.

Called Sunne, the light is equipped with photovoltaic cells and an integrated battery, allowing it to harvest and store enough energy throughout the day to light up a room at night. Van Aubel designed the lamp as part of an ongoing project to normalise solar technology by bringing it inside homes.

“To facilitate a shift in our perception towards solar, it also needs to be more accessible to a larger group of people,” she told Dezeen. “People need to be able to familiarise themselves with it and have it in their surroundings. Sunne is a first step to integrating solar energy into our everyday life.”

Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1619138

Design: ‘Jewel Changi Airport’, Singapore By Safdie Architects (Video)

Fulfilling its mission as a connector between the existing terminals, Jewel combines two environments—an intense marketplace and a paradise garden—to create a new community-centric typology as the heart, and soul, of Changi Airport. Jewel re-imagines the center of an airport as a major public realm attraction. Jewel offers a range of facilities for landside airport operations, indoor gardens, leisure attractions, retail offerings and hotel facilities, all under one roof. A distinctive dome-shaped façade made of glass and steel adds to Changi Airport’s appeal as one of the world’s leading air hubs.

Based on the geometry of a torus, the building shape accommodates the programmatic need for multiple connections in the airport setting. At the heart of its glass roof is an oculus that showers water through a primary multistory garden, five stories through to the forest-valley garden at ground level. The core of the program is a 24-hour layered garden attraction that offers many spatial and interactive experiences for visitors. Four cardinal axes—north, south, east, and west—are reinforced by four gateway gardens, which orient visitors and offer visual connections to the internal surroundings and other airport terminals. By night, the glazed facade helps dematerialize the building, revealing the glowing garden within.

Top Architectural Design: ‘Cabin ANNA’ In Eindhoven, Netherlands (Video)

Architectural designer Caspar Schols is producing a flat-pack version of a garden shed with moving walls, which he built for his parents before he went to architecture school, as cabins for living and for working.

Schols drew on the Garden House pavilion he completed with no formal architecture training in Eindhoven in 2016 to develop two design: the ANNA Stay home and the ANNA Meet workplace. As with Garden House, the Cabin ANNA concepts have and inner beam-and-glass structure that is separated from the outer wooden walls and metal roof, and set on runners. This means they can be moved and outwards to create different layouts.

“A sellable, fully inhabitable house, a flat-pack that could be built and re-built anywhere in the world,” Schols said. “A dynamic home in the shape of an open platform to live with rather than against the elements, by playing with the configuration of the layers of the house – just like the way you dress yourself to suit different weather conditions, occasions and moods.”

Top Modern Home Tours: “Devon Passivhaus” – East Devon, England (Video)

A linear red-brick wall obscures the textured interiors and art-filled courtyard hidden inside McLean Quinlan’s low-rise Passivhaus home in Devon, UK. The energy-efficient dwelling, aptly named Devon Passivhaus, nestles into a sloped walled garden that was once owned by an old English country house that fell into a state of disrepair.

The overall design is simple and clean. An elegant brick front complements the brickwork of the old garden wall and a discrete front door opening references the gate in the garden wall. Further down, an oriel window breaks through, hinting at what is behind. Elsewhere, external surfaces are dark render, designed to recede visually in deference to the surrounding garden.

Tucked within, the house has a glass roofed courtyard at its centre, a winter garden flooding light into the interior. Spaces are arranged around this central core so the building functions both as a home and a gallery for our clients, great collectors of pottery and art, with spaces to display and curate.

Comfortable and serene interior spaces are punctuated with tactile and textured materials: reclaimed terracotta, rough sawn oak and clay plaster, to ensure that internally the building feels connected to the garden that inspired it.

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Design Lectures: 86-Year Old Italian-British Architect Richard Rogers

In the second talk as part of our Virtual Design Festival collaboration with Architects, not Architecture, architect Richard Rogers discusses his reluctance to enter the Centre Pompidou competition and liking the Lloyd’s building. The idea behind Architects, not Architecture is for architects to discuss their path, influences and experiences.

In his lecture in November 2017, Rogers explained that he’d been told he couldn’t use buildings for his talk, as the main rule of the series is that architects aren’t allowed to discuss their projects. “I said: That’s like saying I can’t use my two hands,” Rogers said.

“Architecture is part of me. And architecture is not just about buildings, it’s about spaces and places.” Born in Florence, Rogers moved to England with his family and studied at the Architectural Association School in London, where he founded Richard Rogers Partnership with Su Rogers, now Rogers Stirk Harbour + Partners, in 1977.

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Top Urban Architecture: Ancerl Studio In Toronto – Two Homes “Appear” As One On A Very Tight Lot

From a Dezeen.com online article (March 28, 2020):

Ancerl Studio Toronto Sorauren 116 - 118 Interior“The detached homes have been conceptualised to visually appear as one single volume defined by its traditional triangular architecture,” said the studio. “Only from up close will the observer notice a crisp breakpoint between the properties.”

Canadian firm Ancerl Studio has designed a pair of houses in Toronto to make them look like a single building.

Both properties include three bedrooms. In Sorauren 116, the master suite occupies the entire top floor of the house. A balcony opens from the bedroom towards the backyard, and the bathroom is separated from the bedroom by a spacious walk-through closet.

The two houses are located on very tight lots on Sorauren Street in the city’s Parkdale neighbourhood, as is typical in Toronto’s residential neighbourhoods.

Ancerl Studio Website

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