Tag Archives: Classics

Classic Cars: “1934 Bugatti Type 59 Sports” (Video)

Gooding & Company proudly presents the ultimate Bugatti Grand Prix car: the incomparable Type 59. This extraordinary 1934 Bugatti Type 59 Sports represents the ultimate evolution of the Bugatti Grand Prix car and is both a technical marvel and a masterpiece of industrial art. Carefully preserved by just four subsequent owners, and presented today in time-warp condition, 57248 is arguably the most important, original, and coveted of all competition Bugattis.

Classic Cars: “1961 Aston Martin DB4 GT Zagato”

Gooding & Company proudly presents one of the most beautiful, iconic, and desirable sports cars of its era. Although just 19 examples were built, the DB4 GT Zagato’s aesthetic and racing achievements have left a powerful and enduring legacy. With its irreplaceable, soulful character, unique appearance, and superb provenance, 0176/R is one of the very best, most original examples of this rare and sought-after breed.

Classic Cars: “1937 Bugatti Type 57S Atalante” (Video)

One of the most sought after and desired Bugatti Type 57S variants was the Type 57S Atalante. The 57S Atalante sports the Jean Bugatti designed Atalante body style fitted to the lowered Type 57S chassis. With its 3.2L straight eight engine and its sleek aerodynamic design, the 57S Atalante was a world class performance car. It was common for Type 57S owners to fit the Bugatti supercharger (designated by the letter C), effectively upgrading their cars to Type 57SC specification.

Top Classic Cars: “1955 Aston Martin DB3S” (Video)

Gooding & Company proudly presents this beautiful 1955 Aston Martin DB3S. This car, chassis 102, is one of three Almond Green customer cars ordered for the the Australian racing team, the Kangaroo Stable.

As their lead car, 102 was campaigned throughout Europe, England, and New Zealand during 1955 and 1956, with the most notable result being a 2nd Overall finish at the 12 Hours of Hyères.

Today, this DB3S stands as a wonderful reminder of the glory days of international sports car racing – a halcyon period when eager amateurs could find themselves locked in battle with the works racing teams on the world’s great circuits.

Classic Cars: “1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta Lusso”

RM Sotheby's logoRide along with Global Head of Auctions, Gord Duff as he drives chassis 5379, the 235th Lusso produced, and the only example ever provided in this Avorio over Rosso color combination. Purchased by the late Dr. Raymond Boniface in 1974, the Lusso would go on to be part of his collection of outstanding Italian cars and subsequently was a regular guest at many FCA and concours events over the next 30 years. Having been driven just 46,770 miles at the time of cataloging, this highly original Lusso is full of character—offering a glimpse into 45 years of keen custodianship, exhibition history, provenance, and everything else that comes with driving a classic, blue-chip Ferrari in America.

Classic Cars: “1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe”(Video)

Turn your volume all the way up and watch as RM Sotheby’s Car Specialist Barney Ruprecht takes the stunning and rare 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Pinin Farina for a cruise on the open road. Combining brisk performance with distinctive styling, the unique chassis no. 1433 GT, the 185th of 353 examples built, sports numerous bespoke details, including chromed door sills and a 410 Superamerica-style air intake on the hood. Fitted with its original numbers-matching engine, 1433 GT is among the finest available, accompanied by the lauded Ferrari Classiche certification and finished in elegant colors of Blu with an Argento roof making it truly one of a kind.

History Of Auto Design: The Family Origins Of The “Porsche 911” (Gestalten)

GestaltenWhen Ferdinand Alexander Porsche entered the family business in 1958, he filled an unknown vacuum. An experimental visionary who wanted to challenge tradition, he elevated the design legacy of this famous German brand. From working in the engineering office to craftily creating an icon amongst sportscars, writer Ulf Porschardt reveals how Ferdinand Alexander’s sketches evolved to become a cultural symbol.

Count Goertz designed a prestigious, muscular sports car for the Zuffenhausen-based company that was more reminiscent of a Ferrari or a Maserati…

The Goertzian design was in love with the grand gesture. The same year Roland Barthes declared the car to be the equivalent of the great Gothic cathedrals, and in his popular and shamelessly cited work Mythologies, considered it a major creation of the epoch, passionately conceived by numerous nameless artists. In the style of pop art, Barthes enacted an intellectual and cultural upgrading of the automobile, without the hyper-modern pathos of the futurists.

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