Tag Archives: Movies

Reviews: ‘Nomadland’ – Jessica Bruder Book Now An Award-Winning Movie

The latest selection for our “Now Read This” book club, Jessica Bruder’s “Nomadland,” documents a growing phenomenon in the country — a “wandering tribe” of seasonal workers. It has inspired a new movie of the same name. The film was the big winner at the British Academy Film Awards, and has multiple Oscar nominations. Jeffrey Brown has the latest for our ongoing arts and culture series, CANVAS.

Inside Views: Ali MacGraw & Ryan O’Neal On The Filming Of “Love Story”

Turner Classic Movies host Ben Mankiewicz interviews the stars of the classic tearjerker, “Love Story,” to talk about the making of an unlikely box office blockbuster, and asks: What does “Love means never having to say you’re sorry” really mean?

Science & Film: Physicist Brian Greene Reviews ‘Time Travel Movies’ (Video)

Theoretical Physicist, String Theorist and Professor, Brian Greene looks at how time travel is portrayed in popular films. You can get his new book, Until the End of Time, here: https://amzn.to/3pTGyVx

Until the End of Time is Brian Greene’s breathtaking new exploration of the cosmos and our quest to understand it. Greene takes us on a journey across time, from our most refined understanding of the universe’s beginning, to the closest science can take us to the very end. He explores how life and mind emerged from the initial chaos, and how our minds, in coming to understand their own impermanence, seek in different ways to give meaning to experience: in story, myth, religion, creative expression, science, the quest for truth, and our longing for the timeless, or eternal.

Through a series of nested stories that explain distinct but interwoven layers of reality-from the quantum mechanics to consciousness to black holes-Greene provides us with a clearer sense of how we came to be, a finer picture of where we are now, and a firmer understanding of where we are headed. Yet all this understanding, which arose with the emergence of life, will dissolve with its conclusion. Which leaves us with one realisation: during our brief moment in the sun, we are tasked with the charge of finding our own meaning. Let us embark.

Media Streaming: ‘How Disney+ Quickly Became A Top-Tier Player’ (WSJ)

The launch of Disney+ has brought a bit of magic to a company whose stock had taken a nosedive after the coronavirus shut down theme parks and movie theaters. WSJ explains how Disney’s streaming platform has become a top competitor in an already crowded field. Photo illustration: Jacob Reynolds/WSJ

2021: Five Major Stories Shaping The World (Video)

The World in 2021 will start to look beyond covid-19: to the launch of an asteroid-smashing space probe, the next step in the fight against climate change and China’s supremacy at the box office. Here are five stories to watch out for.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Top five stories for 2021 00:39 – Democracy under threat 04:17 – The electric revolution revs up 06:55 – A chance to turn a corner on climate change 10:39 – China v Hollywood: battle of the box offices 14:40 – Defending the planet

Enterainment: Will AMC Theaters Survive Covid-19 Closures During 2020?

The coronavirus pandemic shuttered every single AMC theater for months. But the pandemic isn’t the only thing pushing the company onto financially shaky ground. Photo Illustration: Jacob Reynolds/WSJ

Interviews: 59-Year Old Actor George Clooney

Actor-director George Clooney returns to the world of sci-fi with his latest futuristic drama, the post-apocalyptic thriller “The Midnight Sky,” He talks with correspondent Tracy Smith about shooting in Iceland; how marriage and fatherhood has changed his perspective; and does he really cut his own hair?

George Timothy Clooney is an American actor, film director, producer, and screenwriter. He is the recipient of three Golden Globe Awards and two Academy Awards, one for acting in Syriana and the other for co-producing Argo. In 2018, he was the recipient of the AFI Lifetime Achievement Award.

Diet Study: The Top 250 U.S. Movies Depict Unhealthy Foods & Drinks (Stanford)

Stanford researchers examined the 250 top-grossing American movies of recent decades and found the on-screen foods and beverages largely failed U.S. government nutrition recommendations and U.K. youth advertising standards.

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New Books: ‘Billy Wilder On Assignment’ (Video)

Billy Wilder on Assignment: Dispatches from Weimar Berlin and Interwar Vienna Billy Wilder

Edited by Noah Isenberg Introduction by Noah Isenberg Translated by Shelley Frisch

Acclaimed film director Billy Wilder’s early writings—brilliantly translated into English for the first time Before Billy Wilder became the screenwriter and director of iconic films like Sunset Boulevard and Some Like It Hot, he worked as a freelance reporter, first in Vienna and then in Weimar Berlin.

Billy Wilder on Assignment brings together more than fifty articles, translated into English for the first time, that Wilder (then known as “Billie”) published in magazines and newspapers between September 1925 and November 1930. From a humorous account of Wilder’s stint as a hired dancing companion in a posh Berlin hotel and his dispatches from the international film scene, to his astute profiles of writers, performers, and political figures, the collection offers fresh insights into the creative mind of one of Hollywood’s most revered writer-directors.

Wilder’s early writings—a heady mix of cultural essays, interviews, and reviews—contain the same sparkling wit and intelligence as his later Hollywood screenplays, while also casting light into the dark corners of Vienna and Berlin between the wars. Wilder covered everything: big-city sensations, jazz performances, film and theater openings, dance, photography, and all manner of mass entertainment. And he wrote about the most colorful figures of the day, including Charlie Chaplin, Cornelius Vanderbilt, the Prince of Wales, actor Adolphe Menjou, director Erich von Stroheim, and the Tiller Girls dance troupe.

Film historian Noah Isenberg’s introduction and commentary place Wilder’s pieces—brilliantly translated by Shelley Frisch—in historical and biographical context, and rare photos capture Wilder and his circle during these formative years.

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