Tag Archives: Arizona

Southwestern Views: The Dude Ranches Of Arizona

Join the staff and guests of Circle Z Ranch, Tanque Verde Ranch, and Stagecoach Trails Guest Ranch, as they experience life on a ranch.

Located on thousands of acres of the most scenic horseback riding in Southern Arizona. The Circle Z Ranch offers all-inclusive ranch vacations; 3 delicious meals/day, horseback riding, tennis, game room, outdoor pool, hiking, bird watching, campfires, cookouts, nature walks and guided stargazing.

Tanque Verde Ranch is one of America’s old-time cattle and guest ranches. Located on 60,000 acres of Tucson’s most breathtaking desert landscapes, nestled amongst the Rincon Mountains and adjacent to Saguaro National Park and Coronado National Forest.

Located in a secluded wilderness area, Stagecoach Trails Guest Ranch is 1 hour away from the nearest town. No crowds, no cities, just incredible nature. Only 2 hours south of Las Vegas and 2 hours from the Grand Canyon West Rim, our ranch family is dedicated to providing you with one of the best all-inclusive dude ranch vacations you can find.

Exhibits: ‘Philip C. Curtis – Landscapes of Arizona’ (Phoenix Art Museum)

Philip C. Curtis saw the desert through a lens of magic realism.

Landscape remains one of the most popular subjects for artists visiting and residing in Arizona. Philip C. Curtis, while not known as a landscape painter, draws extensively on that subject. Curtis came to the state in 1937 to establish the Phoenix Federal Art Center under the Federal Art Project, a New Deal program. He left two years later to head a similar facility in Des Moines, Iowa, but returned to Arizona in 1947.

Settling in Scottsdale, he painted surreal compositions, with figures in Victorian costumes set in the desert. Arizona’s landscapes were a rich source of inspiration for him, and while his canvases do not portray any recognizable geological features, his work may be contextualized within the work of a broad spectrum of artists who came to the state. Curtis saw the desert through a lens of magic realism. This differed from Maxfield Parrish, Eugene Berman, and other artists who preferred more representational modes.

Arizona Views: Chiricahua National Monument Tour

Join ranger Theresa Ferraro as she talks about the history, people, and geology of Chiricahua National Monument—located in one of Arizona’s seven sky islands.

Chiricahua National Monument is a unit of the National Park System located in the Chiricahua Mountains of southeastern Arizona. The monument was established on April 18, 1924, to protect its extensive hoodoos and balancing rocks. 

Views: The Painted Desert – Northeastern Arizona

“Sunday Morning” takes us to the picturesque rocky badlands of northern Arizona. Videographer: Brad Markel.

The Painted Desert is a United States desert of badlands in the Four Corners area, running from near the east end of Grand Canyon National Park and southeast into Petrified Forest National Park. It is most easily accessed from the north portion of Petrified Forest National Park.

Science: Building A Mars Analog In Arizona, Moral Outrage Algorithms

Contributing Correspondent Michael Price joins host Sarah Crespi to discuss the newest Mars analog to be built on the location of the first attempt at a large-scale sealed habitat, Biosphere 2 in Arizona. 

Next, William Brady, a postdoctoral researcher in the psychology department at Yale University, talks with Sarah about using an algorithm to measure increasing expressions of moral outrage on social media platforms. 

Classic Road Trips: Route 66 From Hackleberry To Seligman, Arizona (Video)

Historic US Route 66—the Mother Road, also known as the Main Street of America—used to take drivers all the way from Chicago, Ill. to Santa Monica, Calif. along one continuous route.

Though its heyday is gone, travelers still find their way to Route 66, drawn by the history, nostalgia and places that dot its roadside. Arizona contains one of the longest remaining stretches of the original Route 66, extending across the state from Holbrook (east) to Kingman (west).

Journey with us as we meet some of the more unusual and famous people and places along the route, starting in Hackberry, 20 miles northeast of Kingman, and ending in Seligman, home of Angel Delgadillo, who helped lead the preservation of Route 66.

Western Drought: Expect More Fires & Water Wars

As of mid-June, nearly three-quarters of the US’s West has been experiencing “severe,” “extreme,” or “exceptional” drought conditions. In addition to the states above, it also includes northern states like North Dakota and Montana.

Overall, climate change is playing a role. But there are smaller factors at play that are tied to climate change as well. Including…

  • Not enough rain. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA) said the Southwest’s 2020 monsoon season (read: ‘nonsoon’) was “the hottest and driest summer/monsoon season on record.” And the decrease in rainfall is having an impact on today’s drought (think: not enough water for crops, lakes, or reservoirs). And for the little rain that has fallen, it could dry up faster because of…
  • Warmer temps. The NOAA dubbed 2020 the second-hottest year on record. And in late June, a record-breaking heat wave hit the Pacific Northwest, with the temperature reaching up to 112 degrees Fahrenheit in places like Portland, OR. (Psst…if you’re dealing with hot weather, here are some tips to stay safe.) Hotter, drier weather creates a thirsty environment, which speeds up evaporation. Rising temps are also causing snowpacks to melt faster, and they’re reportedly producing less runoff – a vital water resource. All of which means there’s less water available for communities and ecosystems.

Experts are also worried that the current dry and hot conditions will have a ripple effect, which brings us to wildfires. Last year’s West Coast wildfire season was the worst ever. Fires in California killed 31 people, burned more than 4 million acres, and destroyed thousands of buildings and structures. And this year, states like Arizona have seen an early start to their wildfire season. But the effects of the drought stretch even further.

Walks: Petrified Forest National Park, Arizona

Petrified Forest National Park is in northeastern Arizona. In its south, the Rainbow Forest is full of colorful petrified wood. It’s home to the Rainbow Forest Museum, with its paleontology exhibits and many trail access points. In the park’s center are the petroglyphs of Newspaper Rock and the ruined village of Puerco Pueblo. To the north, the Painted Desert Inn, a 1930s adobe building, is a museum with Hopi murals. 

Petrified Forest National Park contains the petrified remains of 225 million-year-old trees from the Late Triassic Period. Surrounding the petrified wood are millions of years of deposition, uplift, and erosion, creating the Chinle Formation. This rock formation creates the red hues of the Painted Desert and the blue tones of the Blue Mesa region. Petrified Forest is situated near the southern edge of the Colorado Plateau with elevations ranging from 5300 feet to 6235 feet. It was the uplift of the Colorado Plateau, starting about 60 million years ago, and the erosion that followed and continues today, which carved the present landscape.