Tag Archives: Ferrari

Art & Auto Racing: French Artist Yan Denes’ “Blur & Movement Of The 1960’s”

“My primary era is clearly the ’60s,” he says. “For these scenes, I use period photos with the agreement of their photographer and allow myself some freedom on the framing, for example. I like racing cars, and if they have flaws or imperfections, I represent them faithfully, of course.”

“My master is Leonardo da Vinci, who is the ultimate reference in drawing because of his mastery of blur and movement,” he says. “There’s an indeterminate aspect to these drawings that’s essential. It reminds me of Picasso’s famous phrase ‘finishing a drawing, what a horror’ – that’s exactly it, I always leave an area of blur and a part of emptiness. The viewer fills that space with their experience, their story. In this way, a drawing is simply an exchange – an encounter between two people.”

Few artists, like Yan Denes, understand how to make the thrill of speed tangible for the observer with pen and paper. Not only did he design Scuderia Ferrari’s anniversary helmets in Formula 1, but he is also inspired by historic motorsport.

While the vast majority of Denes’ commissions come from owners of modern Ferrari race cars such as the 360 Challenge, 430 GT2, 488 GT3 and FXX, Yan is actually better known for his passion for historic racing scenes.

It has to be said that Denes is a virtuoso when it comes to transcribing speed and movement.

Read more at Classic Driver

Classic Cars: “1964 Ferrari 250 GT/L Berlinetta Lusso”

RM Sotheby's logoRide along with Global Head of Auctions, Gord Duff as he drives chassis 5379, the 235th Lusso produced, and the only example ever provided in this Avorio over Rosso color combination. Purchased by the late Dr. Raymond Boniface in 1974, the Lusso would go on to be part of his collection of outstanding Italian cars and subsequently was a regular guest at many FCA and concours events over the next 30 years. Having been driven just 46,770 miles at the time of cataloging, this highly original Lusso is full of character—offering a glimpse into 45 years of keen custodianship, exhibition history, provenance, and everything else that comes with driving a classic, blue-chip Ferrari in America.

Classic Cars: “1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe”(Video)

Turn your volume all the way up and watch as RM Sotheby’s Car Specialist Barney Ruprecht takes the stunning and rare 1959 Ferrari 250 GT Coupe by Pinin Farina for a cruise on the open road. Combining brisk performance with distinctive styling, the unique chassis no. 1433 GT, the 185th of 353 examples built, sports numerous bespoke details, including chromed door sills and a 410 Superamerica-style air intake on the hood. Fitted with its original numbers-matching engine, 1433 GT is among the finest available, accompanied by the lauded Ferrari Classiche certification and finished in elegant colors of Blu with an Argento roof making it truly one of a kind.

Travel & Driving Videos: A “1961 Ferrari 250 GT SWB Berlinetta” In Swiss Alps

Ferrari 250 GT Berlinetta SWB 1961

One of the most notable GT racers of its time, the 1959 250 GT Berlinetta SWB used a short (2,400 mm (94.5 in)) wheelbase for better handling. Of the 176 examples built, both steel and aluminum bodies were used in various road (“lusso”) and racing trims. Engine output ranged from 240 PS (177 kW; 237 hp) to 280 PS (206 kW; 276 hp). The “lusso” road car version was originally fitted with 185VR15 Pirelli Cinturato (CA67).

Development of the 250 GT SWB Berlinetta was handled by Giotto BizzarriniCarlo Chiti, and young Mauro Forghieri, the same team that later produced the 250 GTODisc brakes were a first on a Ferrari GT, and the combination of low weight, high power, and well-sorted suspension made it competitive. It was unveiled at the Paris Motor Show in October and quickly began selling and racing. The SWB Berlinetta won Ferrari the GT class of the 1961 Constructor’s Championship. Also won 1960, 1961 and 1962 Tour de France Automobile before giving ground to the GTO’s.

In 2004, Sports Car International placed the 250 GT SWB seventh on a list of Top Sports Cars of the 1960s, and Motor Trend Classic placed it fifth on a list of the ten “Greatest Ferraris of all time”.

Read article

Italian Sports Cars: “1958 Ferrari 250 GT LWB California Spider” (Video)

Join President David Gooding as he takes one of the all-time great Ferraris out on the open road. After successfully completing multiple editions of the California Mile and Colorado Grand and taking home top prizes from Cavallino Classic and Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance®, the quality and beauty of 0937 GT is undeniable.

This outstanding covered headlight example will be offered at The Amelia Island 2020 auction with the ultra-rare factory hardtop.

Learn more: https://www.goodingco.com/vehicle/195…

Classic Car Nostalgia: “1970 Fiat Dino 2400 Coupé”

From Wikipedia:

1970 Fiat Dino 2400 Coupé Interior Classic DriverThe Fiat Dino (Type 135) was a front-engine, rear-wheel-drive sports car produced by Fiat from 1966 to 1973. The Dino name refers to the Ferrari Dino V6 engine, produced by Fiat and installed on the cars to achieve the production numbers sufficient for Ferrari to homologate the engine for Formula 2 racing.

Fiat Dino 2400, 1969–1973

1970 Fiat Dino 2400 Spider – In 1969, both Ferrari and Fiat introduced new 2.4-litre Dino models. The Fiat Dino 2400 premiered in October 1969 at the Turin Motor show; besides the larger engine, another notable improvements was independent rear suspension.[8] The V6 now put out 180 PS (132 kW; 178 hp), and used a cast iron instead of the previous light alloy engine block; the same engine was installed on the Dino 246 GT, Ferrari’s evolution of the 206. Whereas the original Dino was equipped with a rigid axle suspended by leaf springs and 4 shock absorbers, 2.4-litre cars used a coil-sprung independent rear suspension with 2 shock absorbers derived from the Fiat 130. Rather than engine power and absolute speed, the most important consequence of the larger displacement was a marked increase in torque, available at lower engine speeds; the Dino 2400 had much better pickup, and it was found more usable, even in city traffic.

Classic Car Nostalgia: The “1965 ASA 1000 GT” Was A “Ferrarina” (Little Ferrari)

From Wikipedia:

1965 ASA 1000 GT Classic Driver December 2019The ASA 1000 GT originated in a late 1950s experimental project by Ferrari engineers to create a less expensive, compact alternative to existing Ferrari GT cars. This project was designated “854” by the factory (for 850cc, 4 cylinders), however it was commonly but unofficially named “Ferrarina,” meaning “Little Ferrari.”[3]

ASA (Autocostruzioni Società per Azioni) was an Italian automobile manufacturer active from 1961 to 1969, who is known for manufacturing the ASA 1000 GT. This car was developed by Ferrari engineers in the late 1950s as a less expensive, compact alternative to existing Ferrari GT cars. ASA used inline-four and straight-six engines derived from the “250” 3-litre V12 designed by Gioacchino Colombo. The chassis was developed Giotto Bizzarrini, and derived from the tubular frame of the 250 GTO.

The prototype that would become the ASA 1000 GT was first presented by Carrozzeria Bertone (Geneva 1961) under the name “Mille”. Following this debut in late 1961, Enzo Ferrari decided to not sell the new car as a Ferrari and entrusted production to a close friend, Oronzio de Nora. The car was manufactured in Milan by a newly formed company called ASA (owned by the De Nora Electrochemical Group) from 1964 to 1969. The 1000 GT model was officially introduced in 1962, but due to production difficulties series production did not begin until 1964.[1][2]

Photos from Classic Driver: https://www.classicdriver.com/en/car/asa/1000-gt/1965/725030