Tag Archives: United Nations

Views: Global Population Projections By Year 2100

Climate Change: “Don’t Choose Extinction” (U.N.)

A visitor to the United Nations General Assembly has a message about climate change, telling us government-supported fossil fuel subsidies will prove disastrous to our species. The computer-animated Frankie the Dinosaur (voiced by actor Jack Black) stars in this message produced by the U.N. Development Program as part of its “Don’t Choose Extinction” campaign, timed to the COP-26 climate conference in Glasgow.

Climate Science: Young People Voice Concerns Onboard The COP26 Train

Last weekend, hundreds of young people boarded a specially chartered train in Amsterdam to travel to Glasgow ahead of the United Nations COP26 climate summit.

Among them were scientists, activists and policy makers. In a Nature Podcast special, we boarded the train to catch up with some of them – to talk about their science, their motivations and their message.

Morning News: Syria & UN Aid, Hong Kong & Airbnb Restrictions In France

The latest on the UN Security Council showdown over humanitarian aid for Syria. Plus: we find out about Hong Kong’s chief executive Carrie Lam’s call for parents to monitor their children’s political beliefs and the French cities that are imposing restrictions on Airbnb.

Tours: The International Court Of Justice (ICJ), The Hague, Netherlands

This virtual tour of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) leads the viewers through the rooms of the Peace Palace used by the judges in carrying out their judicial functions.

FAQ ——

What is the International Court of Justice?

The Court is the principal judicial organ of the United Nations. It was established by the United Nations Charter, which was signed in 1945 in San Francisco (United States), and began work in 1946 in the Peace Palace, The Hague (Netherlands).

The Court, which is composed of 15 judges, has a twofold role: first, to settle, in accordance with international law, legal disputes between States submitted to it by them and, second, to give advisory opinions on legal matters referred to it by duly authorized United Nations organs and specialized agencies.

The Court’s official languages are English and French.

Who may submit cases to the Court? Only States are eligible to appear before the Court in contentious cases. The Court has no jurisdiction to deal with applications from individuals, non-governmental organizations, corporations or any other private entity. It cannot provide them with legal advice or help them in their dealings with national authorities. However, a State may take up the case of one of its nationals and invoke against another State the wrongs which its national claims to have suffered at the hands of the latter; the dispute then becomes one between States.

What differentiates the International Court of Justice from the International Criminal Court and the ad hoc international criminal tribunals?

The International Court of Justice has no jurisdiction to try individuals accused of war crimes or crimes against humanity. As it is not a criminal court, it does not have a prosecutor able to initiate proceedings. This task is the preserve of national courts, the ad hoc criminal tribunals established by the United Nations (such as the International Residual Mechanism for Criminal Tribunals (IRMCT), mandated to take over residual functions from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR)) or in co-operation with it (such as the Special Court for Sierra Leone and the Special Tribunal for Lebanon), and also of the International Criminal Court, set up under the Rome Statute.

Morning News Podcast: U.N. Coronavirus Report, China-Iran Agreement

We discuss the UN’s report into the origins of the coronavirus pandemic and hear about a new comprehensive agreement signed between Beijing and Tehran.

Plus: we head to Iceland as the countdown to Eurovision begins.

World History: ‘The Decline And Fall Of The League Of Nations’ (Video)

Click here to watch on YouTube

This film is the history of the League of Nations from 1930 to the onset of the Second world War: that 10-year span ending when Geneva, surrounded by Axis Powers, almost faded into memory.

Global: How Essential Is Amazon, British Politics & United Nations (Podcast)

The Economist Editor's PicksA selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, Amazon is essential, but vulnerable; (10:35) pandemic politics in Britain; (18:15) and the United Nations after 75 years.