Exhibits: Peter Alexander ‘Echoes Of Perception’ At Museum Of California Art

Langson IMCA in Irvine, CA – September 24, 2022 – January 14, 2023

In 2019, artist Peter Alexander was invited by Langson IMCA Museum Director Kim Kanatani to curate an exhibition of California Impressionism from the Museum’s collections.

Prior to his untimely death in 2020, Alexander had begun identifying works that he felt exemplified the California Impressionists’ profound connection to the light, space, and natural phenomena of California and the similar influence they had on his own work.

In honor of Alexander’s commitment to the project, a team of curators consisting of Kevin Appel, Julianne Gavino, Kim Kanatani, Curt Klebaum, Claudia Parducci, and Bruce Richards expanded the exhibition into a dialogue between the early modernist painters and Alexander’s own work, forming a fluid exchange between generations equally influenced by the atmospheric light of the Golden State.

The passages in this exhibition follow phenomena experienced over the course of a day from dawn, to dusk, to the depths of night. From mountain peaks to the ocean floor, Alexander and these California Impressionist painters echo one another in their pursuit of capturing the ineffable sensibility of place and space.

With works spanning from 1896 to 2020, Echoes of Perception: Peter Alexander and California Impressionism includes 14 Impressionist works from Langson IMCA’s collection along with 11 of Alexander’s resin sculptures, canvases, works on paper, and a painting on velvet that offer an alternative way to engage with California Impressionism through the eyes of this pioneering contemporary artist.

Urban Planning: Will The Cities Of The Future Float?

A new industry of floating infrastructure is emerging to help adapt to rising sea levels. There are two distinct approaches that are being put forth as possible solutions: retrofitting homes to be amphibious and building floating cities.

Amphibious homes can preserve the accessibility of the house and maintain the congenial front porch culture in places like Louisiana, said Elizabeth English, founder and director of The Buoyant Foundation Project. English’s design places a steel frame beneath a house, and then below that, in the crawl space, buoyancy elements. Her team then recommends adding elements to prevent lateral movement so the home will not float away while on the surface of floodwaters.

She estimated that a contractor could do such a retrofit for about $20 to $30 per square foot, but cautioned the Federal Emergency Management Agency currently discourages this type of building practice. Modern floating cities are the brainchild of architect Bjarke Ingels. He told CNBC he hopes his Oceanix City, which is currently slated to be built in the harbor near Busan,

South Korea, will be “a city that is the most resilient city you can imagine, but at the same time, the most enjoyable city that you can imagine.” “We really hope that it will be a successful project and we would like to replicate it in other parts of the world,” Maimunah Mohd Sharif, executive director of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme, told CNBC of the Oceanix development.

She said the world must look more into adaptation and hopes that the project can help mitigate or even solve the problem of sea-level rise. Would you live in a floating city or retrofit your home so it floats during floods? Watch the video above to learn more about what life could be like in these innovative climate change adaptations.

Reviews: The Top 12 Biking Cities In The U.S. & Canada

Cities in Europe, particularly the Netherlands, are known for their amazing bicycle infrastructure. Can a city in the top one percent of all bike cities in the United States compete with the best in Europe? And how much better are these top US bike cities when compared to the worst in the US?

Architecture Books: Dana Krystle – ‘Sketchbook №13 – A Series Of Illustrations’

Sketchbook №13 is part of a large sketchbook series in architecture illustrations created between 2013 and 2022, in this sketchbook the illustrations were created between 2019 and 2022. Materials used in this sketchbook are mixed medias of oil paint, acrylics, charcoal, watercolor, gouache, pen, ink, and colored pencils.

The aim of architecture illustrations is directed at creating inspiration and conceptual ideas that are used for creative concept decisions in projects and mood boards.

I hope this sketchbook gives you inspiration for creating your own version of architectural illustration sketchbooks and come up with beautiful architecture designs and concepts in your upcoming projects. A thorough documentation is set to collect and archive all the sketches that were created during this series and body of work.

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Wildlife Photography: Jocelyn Anderson & “The Beautiful World Of Birds”

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A Great Blue Heron strikes a pose as they walk down the log runway.

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A Blue Jay challenges a female Red-bellied Woodpecker. She was startled off the railing, but she immediately flew back to her spot and the Blue Jay gave way.
The legs of two sandhill cranes, a baby sandhill crane and a gosling walk side-by-side down a wooden bridge
The unusual pairing of a sandhill crane and Canada goose 

Ukraine War Analysis: Time Magazine – Oct 10, 2022

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Inside the Ukrainian Counterstrike That Turned the Tide of the War

What to Know About the Protests Over Mahsa Amini’s Death

Is the Crypto Community in Puerto Rico Helping or Hurting After Hurricane Fiona?

Republicans Reveal Immigration Agenda Ahead of Midterms

Walking Tours: Side In Southern Turkey (4K)

Side is a resort town on Turkey’s southern Mediterranean coast. An ancient port city, it’s known for long beaches and Greco-Roman ruins. In the center are the remains of the 2nd-century Antique Theater, which seated up to 15,000. The white marble columns of the Hellenistic Temple of Athena stand near the harbor. Other sites are sprinkled throughout, with finds housed at the Side Museum, a restored Roman bath complex. 

Opinion: A New Look Gulf, Putin’s Desperate Draft & The Google-Meta Duopoly

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, a new-look Gulf, Vladimir Putin’s partial mobilization (10:45), and the Google-Meta advertising duopoly (15:00). 

Front Page: The New York Times – September 27, 2022

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The Dollar Is Strong. That Is Good for the U.S. but Bad for the World.

The Federal Reserve may have no choice but to wage a relentless inflation fight, but countries rich and poor are feeling the pain of plunging currencies.

White House Student Loan Forgiveness Could Cost About $400 Billion

The estimate by the nonpartisan Congressional Budget Office gauged the cost over 30 years, though the bulk of the effects to the economy would be felt over the next decade.