Covers: New York Times Magazine – Sept 11, 2022

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The 9.11.22 Issue – The Education Issue

In this Education Issue, Sarah Viren on a campus clash in a multicultural center that became a viral nightmare for Arizona State University; Daniel Bergner on a superintendent in northern Michigan who spoke up about race in a politically divided school district; Erika Hayasaki on book bans in Texas town; Charley Locke on the $190 billion Covid windfall for schools; and more.

Hilltop Village Walks: San Gimignano, Tuscany, Italy

San Gimignano is an Italian hill town in Tuscany, southwest of Florence. Encircled by 13th-century walls, its old town centers on Piazza della Cisterna, a triangular square lined with medieval houses. It has a skyline of medieval towers, including the stone Torre Grossa. The Duomo di San Gimignano is a 12th-century church with frescoes by Ghirlandaio in its Santa Fina Chapel.

Top Scenic Drives: Tromsø to Kristiansand In Norway

Norways most scenic roads from Tromsø to Kristiansand.

Tromsø, town, northern Norway. It is located on two islands, Troms (Tromsøy) and Kval (Kvaløy), just west of the mainland. Because Tromsø is located well north of the Arctic Circle, the sun is visible continuously from late May to late July.

Kristiansand, town and seaport, southern Norway. Located on the Skagerrak (strait between Norway and Denmark) at the mouth of the Otra River, it has a spacious, ice-free harbour, protected by offshore islands, and is the largest community of Sørlandet region. 

World Economic Forum: Top Stories Of The Week

The World Economic Forum ‘Stories of the Week include:

0:18 Pakistan’s Flooding – Due to flash floods triggered by a ‘monster monsoon’, more than 1,100 people have died in Pakistan 01:30 First smartphone made in the Ivory Coast – The Open G smartphone went on sale in July 2022 in the Ivory Coast and has sold several thousand units 02:41 Brazil is building the world’s biggest urban garden – The garden is a collaboration between the City of Rio de Janeiro and the favelas – or informal settlements – that surround it 04:09 Drinking Black Tea could help you live longer – People who drink 2 or more cups of black tea a day are 9-13% less likely to die from any cause, according to a study by the US National Institutes of Health.

Design: ‘Sunrise House’ In Melbourne, Australia

Designing an architect’s own home and office space, Jolson architecture and interior design studio combines two distinct spaces that remain inherently separate. With a fascination of blurring lines between architecture, interior design and landscape design, Sunrise House becomes an exploration of how each discipline crafts a sense of space within.

Video timeline: 00:00 – Masterworks Advertisement 00:11 – Introduction to Sunrise House 00:42 – The Original 1950s Confectionary Factory 01:01 – Combining A Family Home and A Commercial Office Space 01:17 – Placing An Emphasis on Natural Light and Garden Space 01:27 – A Sanctuary with Sculptural Elements 02:19 – A Connection Between Outside and Inside 02:52 – Moving Vertically Through The House 03:32 – Connection to History Through The Gym and Courtyard Space 04:14 – Living With Colour, Texture and Memories 04:55 – A Reaction to The Original Facade 05:25 – Masterworks Advertisement

Sitting on the edge of an industrial commercial zone, Sunrise House by Jolson architecture and interior design studio was once a 1950s sweet factory before becoming an architect’s own home. Greenery covers the building’s façade, offering a dynamic sense of style not often seen within Melbourne’s cityscape. Yet inside, the connection from inside to out is made through an open floor plan that allows for the family to easily transition between living areas.

From the entrance, the office and ground level of the house honours the original build by keeping the concrete, paring it back to expose the aggregate. Although, in spaces where new concrete was poured, Jolson celebrates the new markings with memories of his own family, establishing the structure as an architect’s own home as well as a workplace. Retaining as much of the honesty and texture of the original building was key to bringing forth vibrancy.

The main design idea in the open living space was to insert three walls. Black joinery adorns one wall containing a concealed kitchen, another a large artwork that celebrates the history of the building and a third wall containing a luxurious fireplace. Through optimising the entirety of the volume within, Sunshine House becomes more than an architect’s own home, it becomes an art form. Jolson balances life, texture and colour – further complementing the minimal design aspects of an architect’s own home.

Reviews: ‘The Week In Art’

This week: is art censorship on the rise? The Art Newspaper’s chief contributing editor, Gareth Harris, joins Ben Luke to discuss his new book, Censored Art Today.

We look at the different ways in which freedom of expression is being curbed across the globe and at the debates around contested history and cancel culture. This episode’s Work of the Week is Diane Arbus’s Puerto Rican woman with a beauty mark, N.Y.C., 1965, one of the 90 images that feature in Diane Arbus: Photographs, 1956-1971, which opens at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, Canada, on 15 September. Sophie Hackett, the exhibition’s curator, discusses Arbus’s remarkable eye and technical brilliance.

As the Guggenheim Bilbao celebrates its 25th anniversary, Thomas Krens, the director and chief artistic officer of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation from 1988 to 2008, reflects on the genesis and development of a museum that had a dramatic impact on contemporary art and museums’ role in the cultural regeneration of cities across the world. 

Thailand Views: Haad Rin Peninsular Beach (4K)

Hat Rin is a peninsular beach area and town on the southern tip of Ko Pha-ngan, an island in the Gulf of Thailand. Its two main beaches are Sunset Beach to the south and the larger Sunrise Beach to the north. A Full Moon Party takes place on Sunrise Beach each month. 

Previews: The New Yorker Magazine – Sept 19, 2022

A portrait of Queen Elizabeth II against the Union Jack.

Malika Favre’s “Figurehead”

Queen Elizabeth II’s seven-decade reign has come to an end.

By Françoise Mouly, Art by Malika Favre

Queen Elizabeth II died on Thursday, at the age of ninety-six. During her seventy-year-long reign, the Queen presided over the dissolution of the British Empire. She was there for the creation of the European Union—and for Brexit. She was there for Churchill, for Thatcher, and, just last Tuesday, she was there to shake hands with the incoming Conservative Prime Minister, Liz Truss. On the cover of the September 19th issue, the artist Malika Favre, who lived in London for sixteen years, captures the indelible association between Britain and its longtime monarch.

Stories: Queen Elizabeth II Mourned, Russia’s Energy Disruptions, DOJ Appeals

Queen Elizabeth II, the longest-serving British monarch, dies at 96. EU ministers meet in Brussels to discuss Russia’s energy disruptions. And the DOJ appeals the special master review of documents seized by the FBI.

Front Page: The New York Times – September 9, 2022

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The queen’s death comes at a moment of great uncertainty for Britain.

There is no analogous British figure who will be mourned as deeply, or whose death will provoke a greater reckoning with the identity and future of the country.

Long an Uneasy Prince, King Charles III Takes On a Role He Was Born To

Once an awkward, self-doubting young man, he comes to the throne, at 73, as a self-assured, gray-haired eminence.