Category Archives: International

Political Analysis: Brazil – A Fractured Nation (FT)

Latin America’s largest nation is facing its most important election in decades as Jair Bolsonaro and Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva square off amid deep political and cultural polarisation. FT Brazil bureau chief Bryan Harris travels the nation to look at the enormous economic and social challenges facing the next president. He meets wealthy farmers, truckers, evangelicals and those facing food insecurity. Read more at https://on.ft.com/3Cjrg5T

Brazil, officially the Federative Republic of Brazil, is the largest country in both South America and Latin America. At 8.5 million square kilometers and with over 214 million people, Brazil is the world’s fifth-largest country by area and the seventh most populous.

Opinion: A New Look Gulf, Putin’s Desperate Draft & The Google-Meta Duopoly

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, a new-look Gulf, Vladimir Putin’s partial mobilization (10:45), and the Google-Meta advertising duopoly (15:00). 

Previews: Foreign Affairs Magazine – Sept/Oct 2022

September/October 2022

Foreign Affairs at 100 – The Magazine Marks a Century

September/October 2022

The Beginning of History

Surviving the Era of Catastrophic Risk – By William MacAskill

The Dangerous Decade – A Foreign Policy for a World in Crisis By Richard Haass

Opinion: Disunited States Of America, Britain Can’t Build, Pakistan Flooding

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, the disunited states of America, why Britain can’t build (9:15) and Pakistan’s worst floods in recent memory (17:05).

World Journalism: New Internationalist – Sept ’22

September-October 2022, Issue 539

Railways can be a world unto themselves. When properly managed, this can mean it’s easier to get things done on the railways than in other parts of an economy. That should be a huge opportunity for reducing climate emissions by getting passengers off the roads and out of the skies. But unless we re-purpose rail networks to serve the interests of people – and not those of the empires and corporations which built them and run them to this day – we can’t succeed. This edition explores how we can make a start on this task.

WILL BOLSONARO’S SPENDING SPREE LEAVE ANY WINNERS?

With an election looming, Jair Bolsonaro has set an economic timebomb for Brazil, writes Leonardo Sakamoto.

Opinion: The Long War In Ukraine, Supreme Court Activism, Business Books

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to win the long war in Ukrainewhy the Supreme Court’s judicial activism will deepen cracks in America (10:20), and beach reads for business people (17:55).

Preview: The Economist Magazine – July 2, 2022

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Ukraine won the short war. Now comes the long war, and so far, Russia is winning. But it does not have to be fought on Vladimir Putin’s terms

Ukraine won the short war. Mobile and resourceful, its troops inflicted terrible losses and confounded Russian plans to take Kyiv. Now comes the long war. It will drain weapons, lives and money until one side loses the will to fight on. So far, this is a war that Russia is winning.

In recent days its forces have taken the eastern city of Severodonetsk. They are advancing on Lysychansk and may soon control all of Luhansk province. They also threaten Slovyansk, in the north of next-door Donetsk. Ukrainian leaders say they are outgunned and lack ammunition. Their government reckons as many as 200 of its troops are dying each day.

Read more: https://econ.trib.al/tGgFvii

Opinion: Fixing The Energy Crisis, Biden-Harris Issues, Mental Health In China

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to fix the world’s energy emergency without wrecking the environment, the Biden-Harris problem (10:15), and China’s worsening mental-health crisis (16:45). 

Preview: The Economist Magazine – June 25, 2022

How to fix the world’s energy emergency without wrecking the environment

Even as they firefight, governments must resolve the conflict between safe supply and a safe climate.

This year’s energy shock is the most serious since the Middle Eastern oil crises of 1973 and 1979. Like those calamities, it promises to inflict short-term pain and in the longer term to transform the energy industry. The pain is all but guaranteed: owing to high fuel and power prices, most countries are facing soggy growth, inflation, squeezed living standards and a savage political backlash. But the long-run consequences are far from preordained. If governments respond ineptly, they could trigger a relapse towards fossil fuels that makes it even harder to stabilise the climate. Instead they must follow a perilous path that combines security of energy supply with climate security.