Tag Archives: Cities Of The Future

The Future Of Cities: CO2 Absorbing & Repurposed

Will the cities of the future be climate neutral? Might they also be able to actively filter carbon dioxide out of the air? Futurologist Vincente Guallarte thinks so. In fact, he says, our cities will soon be able to absorb CO2, just like trees do.

To accomplish this, Guallarte wants to bring sustainable industries and agriculture to our urban centers, with greenhouses atop every building. But in order for Guallarte’s proposal to work, he says, cities will have learn to submit to the laws and principles of nature. Urban planners also have big plans for our energy supply. In the future, countries like Germany could become energy producers.

In Esslingen am Neckar, residents are working on producing green hydrogen in homes, to be used as fuel for trucks. It’s a project that‘s breaking new ground, says investor Manfred Norbert. Our future cities will be all about redefining a new normal. Architects and urban planners are expecting to see entirely new approaches to communal living, as well as new urban concepts for autonomous supply chains. The repurposing of old buildings, and the generation of food as well as energy, are other important topics.

The architect Arno Brandhuber thinks the current building stock available, and the possibilities it offers, have been underestimated. His spectacular business headquarters are located in an old silo in Berlin’s Lichtenberg district. His most provocative project, something he calls his “Anti-villa,” is a repurposed East German factory for cotton knitwear. It‘s a prime example of sustainable design.

Urban Planning: Will The Cities Of The Future Float?

A new industry of floating infrastructure is emerging to help adapt to rising sea levels. There are two distinct approaches that are being put forth as possible solutions: retrofitting homes to be amphibious and building floating cities.

Amphibious homes can preserve the accessibility of the house and maintain the congenial front porch culture in places like Louisiana, said Elizabeth English, founder and director of The Buoyant Foundation Project. English’s design places a steel frame beneath a house, and then below that, in the crawl space, buoyancy elements. Her team then recommends adding elements to prevent lateral movement so the home will not float away while on the surface of floodwaters.

She estimated that a contractor could do such a retrofit for about $20 to $30 per square foot, but cautioned the Federal Emergency Management Agency currently discourages this type of building practice. Modern floating cities are the brainchild of architect Bjarke Ingels. He told CNBC he hopes his Oceanix City, which is currently slated to be built in the harbor near Busan,

South Korea, will be “a city that is the most resilient city you can imagine, but at the same time, the most enjoyable city that you can imagine.” “We really hope that it will be a successful project and we would like to replicate it in other parts of the world,” Maimunah Mohd Sharif, executive director of the United Nations Human Settlements Programme, told CNBC of the Oceanix development.

She said the world must look more into adaptation and hopes that the project can help mitigate or even solve the problem of sea-level rise. Would you live in a floating city or retrofit your home so it floats during floods? Watch the video above to learn more about what life could be like in these innovative climate change adaptations.

Design: ‘The Line’ – A 100% Renewable Energy & Low Carbon Saudi Arabia City

No roads, cars or emissions, it will run on 100% renewable energy and 95% of land will be preserved for nature. People’s health and wellbeing will be prioritized over transportation and infrastructure, unlike traditional cities. Only 200 meters wide, but 170 kilometers long and 500 meters above sea level.

THE LINE will eventually accommodate 9 million people and will be built on a footprint of just 34 square kilometers. This will mean a reduced infrastructure footprint, creating never-before-seen efficiencies in city functions. The ideal climate all-year-round will ensure that residents can enjoy the surrounding nature. Residents will also have access to all facilities within a five-minute walk, in addition to high-speed rail – with an end-to-end transit of 20 minutes.

Sustainability: Redesign The World Competition – ‘Carbon Neutral Rings’

Pawel Rymsza’s proposal to house humanity in a network of ring-shaped structures built around huge algae-rich lakes is the first of 15 visionary projects shortlisted for the Redesign the World competition powered by Twinmotion.

Called Carbon Neutral Rings, Rymsz’s proposal is to create a network of enclosed carbon-neutral cities for humanity to live in. Each ring is built around a huge reservoir of algae, which would be used to filter the air inside the rings and act as a carbon sink to absorb the city’s emissions.

The carbon dioxide absorbed by reservoirs would ensure the cities are carbon-neutral initially and would become carbon-negative over time as humanity shifts to less carbon-intensive technologies.

Redesign the World is the ultimate design competition, which called for new ideas to rethink planet Earth to ensure that it remains habitable long into the future. Launched in partnership with Epic Games, the contest asked entrants to visualise their concepts using architectural visualisation software Twinmotion.

Read more on Dezeen: https://www.dezeen.com/?p=1730861

Interview: Fareed Zakaria – ‘Ten Lessons For A Post-Pandemic World’ (Video)

Fareed Zakaria of CNN’s “Fareed Zakaria GPS” discussed his latest book “Ten Lessons for a Post-Pandemic World.” The discussion covered the consequences of the pandemic and how COVID-19 could reshape the nation and the world, globalization and the digital age.

CITIES OF THE FUTURE: “The Link – A Conscious City-Forest For 200,000 People” (Luca Curci Architects)

The first smart city “conscious oriented”, that will prevent urban sprawl, produce and storage energy, improve air quality, increase urban biodiversity, and create a healthier lifestyle”. Arch. Luca Curci

With its 300 floors THE LINK will reach the maximum height of 1200 meters. The project combines sustainability with population density, and it aims to build up a zero-energy city-building. The city-forest is made of 4 main towers, connected one each other, equipped with green areas on each level, natural light and ventilation. 100% green transport systems. The vertical city allows its residents to get into a healthier lifestyle, in connection with natural elements, re-thinking the traditional concept of community and society.

The Link Luca Curci Architects 2020

Luca Curci Architects logoArchitecture firm Luca Curci Architects presents THE LINK, a vertical city for 200,000 people. The project aims to rise above the challenge of population density by successfully combining vertical expansion with economic innovation. A self-sustainable city-forest, that will absorb CO2, produce oxygen for cleaner air and increase urban biodiversity. With interconnected communities’ programs. No suburbs. Less poverty oriented.

Using an urban operating system with an AI (Artificial Intelligence), the vertical city will be able to manage the global city temperature, levels of CO2 and humidity, will control the global lighting system, and will storage extra energy produced by solar panels and other renewable energy resources.

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