Covid-19: China Approves The First Inhaled Vaccine

The vaccine, called Convidecia Air, changes the liquid form of the vaccine into an aerosol using a nebuilzer. The vaccine can then be inhaled through the mouth using the nebulizer machine. The needle-free vaccine “can effectively induce comprehensive immune protection in response to SARS-CoV-2 after just one breath,” Cansino said in a statement.

Fortune.com on September 5, 2022 – China’s government approved the world’s first inhaled vaccine against COVID-19, the vaccine’s maker Cansino Biologics announced on Sunday.

In July, Chinese scientists published a pre-print study showing that people who received one booster dose of Cansino’s inhaled vaccine after two doses of the inactivated jab from Chinese maker Sinovac developed more antibodies than people who received three Sinovac shots. Four weeks after receiving the inhaled booster, 92.5% of people had developed neutralizing antibodies for Omicron.

Those who got three doses on Sinovac’s jab did not demonstrate any neutralizing antibodies for Omicron, either four weeks or six months after getting a booster.

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Summer Walks: Streets & Cafes In Central Paris (4K)

Cutting through the very heart of the Paris, the Seine River is the epicenter of the vibrant French capital. The gentle waterway is an integral part of the city and its fascinating history. Lined with traditional booksellers and bordered by beautiful boulevards, historic cafés and charming neighborhoods, the river is an attraction in its own right. 

Walking along the banks of the Seine or taking a relaxing boat tour down its waters is an excellent way to get acquainted with the City of Light. Along the way you’ll encounter a series of beautiful and historic bridges, along with some of the French capital’s most famous buildings and monuments, including the Louvre Museum, Eiffel Tower and the Cathedral of Notre Dame.

World Hunger: Is Biofuel Feeding A Food Crisis?

The UN’s World Food Programme has described 2022 as “a year of unprecedented hunger”, with millions of people in dozens of countries facing famine. At the same time, significant amounts of farmland are being used to produce so-called biofuels. But could a global food crisis change that?

Biofuels are liquid fuels produced from renewable biological sources, including plants and algae. Biofuels offer a solution to one of the challenges of solar, wind, and other alternative energy sources. These energy sources have incredible potential to reduce our dependence on fossil fuels and yield environmental and economic benefits. But many of these sources have a limitation: they can’t replace liquid fuels such as jet fuel, gasoline, and diesel fuel that are critical to our transportation needs. That’s where biofuels could help.

Preview: The New Yorker Magazine – Sept 12, 2022

A crew films a very small dog in the middle of a bustling movie set.

George Balanchine’s Soviet Reckoning

New York City Ballet’s 1962 tour of the U.S.S.R. forced the great choreographer to confront the regime he’d fled and the people he’d left behind.

John Cuneo’s “Top Dog”

The artist discusses canine stars, his first trip abroad, and keeping a sense of the spontaneous in his work.

Miniature Views: Oslo – Capital Of Norway (4K)

A tilt-shift timelapse ride through the city via the Akershus Fortress, Opera House, Dome, Port, Tjuvholmen, Vigelandsparken, Ekebergparken, the ski jump in Holmenkollen and the peninsula Bygdøy in 4 amazing minutes.

Oslo, the capital of Norway, sits on the country’s southern coast at the head of the Oslofjord. It’s known for its green spaces and museums. Many of these are on the Bygdøy Peninsula, including the waterside Norwegian Maritime Museum and the Viking Ship Museum, with Viking ships from the 9th century. The Holmenkollbakken is a ski-jumping hill with panoramic views of the fjord. It also has a ski museum.

A film by Little Big World

Stories: Falling Food Prices, Polio Virus In The West, Tik Tok’s ‘Pink Sauce’

The worst predictions for costs have not come to pass, partly because Russia is selling plenty of wheat. But plenty of food-price woe may still await.

We examine the curious re-appearance of the polio virus in the West. And the trials of “Pink Sauce” reveal the perils of being a cottage-food producer—or consumer—in the social-media age.

Front Page: The New York Times – September 5, 2022

Wary of Cold Days and Hot Tempers, Europe’s Leaders Vow Economic Relief

Germany, Sweden and the Czech Republic announced measures to populations feeling the bite of rising inflation and energy costs tied to war in Ukraine.

Russia’s Unfounded Claims of Secret U.S. Bioweapons Linger On and On

Without providing evidence, the Kremlin is pressing allegations that the U.S. operates labs in Ukraine and beyond. This week, it has called an investigative session in Geneva.