Tag Archives: The Economist Podcasts

Morning News: North Korea Covid Surge, Turkey Voters, Arab School Girls

North Korea’s zero-covid strategy appears to have failed. The country has officially acknowledged 162 cases; the true number is probably orders of magnitude more. 

The country’s health-care system is inadequate, and pre-existing conditions such as tuberculosis and malnutrition are rampant. With elections impending in Turkey, politicians have begun competing with each other to scapegoat refugees. And why girls outperform boys in the Arab world’s schools.

Opinions: Saving The U.S. Supreme Court, Health Care Tech, Remote Work

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, how to save the supreme court from itself, how wearable technology promises to revolutionise health care (10:29) and our Bartleby columnist on why working from anywhere isn’t realistic (18:29).

Morning News: U.S. Raises Rates, Lockdown Fatigue In China, Nelson Mandela

Prices in America are rising faster than at any time in the past 40 years. In response, the Federal Reserve has made its steepest interest-rate hike in 20 years.

Will it be enough to tame inflation while not tipping America into recession? Shanghai’s residents are growing restive after a long lockdown. And Nelson Mandela’s name and legacy are being used to sell a growing range of consumer goods.

Morning News: Taiwan & China Assess Ukraine, El Salvador Gangs, Climate

Much like Ukraine, Taiwan has a well-armed neighbour that does not think it exists as a state: China. We ask what both sides are learning from Russia’s invasion. 

A heavy-handed string of arrests following a flare-up of gang violence in El Salvador is unlikely to change matters. And an analysis reveals the connection between weather and whether voters support climate-change legislation. 

Morning News: Bulgaria & Poland Gas Cut, Singapore Politics, Venice Biennale

By shutting off gas to Poland and Bulgaria, Russia has made an aggressive move that may draw yet more European sanctions. How might the escalation end? 

The popularity of Singapore’s ruling party has slipped, a bit, so it has selected a kinder, gentler leader ahead of elections in 2025. And why the delayed Art Biennale in Venice was worth the wait

Political Views: China Gets It Wrong, Ukraine Stakes, Crypto Utopias

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, what is China getting wrong? Also, why the world should stand up to Putin (10:43). And, crypto and web3: libertarian dream, or socialist Utopia? (18:27).

Morning News: Ukraine Refugees In Poland & New York, Russians In Turkey

The war in Ukraine has created the greatest flux of refugees in Europe since the second world war. 

We visit Poland, where the response has been remarkably smooth, and a New York neighbourhood that is no stranger to émigrés from the region. And we consider the displaced who are largely overlooked: why are so many Russians exiling themselves in Turkey?

Morning News: Taliban Repression Of Women, Virtual Reality Battles

When the Taliban resumed power, there were hopes that women might not be as excluded, repressed and abused as they were previously. Those hopes have faded

As smartphone sales plateau, tech giants are furiously searching for new platforms to conquer. Augmented and virtual reality are the new  battlefields. And the rise of giga-everything: how the scale of science  drives linguistic innovation. 

Political Views: Emmanuel Macron’s Future, Russian War Crimes, Headset Wars

A selection of three essential articles read aloud from the latest issue of The Economist. This week, why Emmanuel Macron’s fate matters beyond Francewar crimes in Ukraine (11:05) and we explore the new headset wars between tech firms (16:05).

Morning News: China’s Zero-Covid Crisis, Prisons Sweltering, Time Disputes

China’s zero-covid policy is being stretched to breaking point as the virus makes its way through the city. Supplies are low, residents are angry and there is no end in sight. 

The debate about air conditioning in America’s sweltering prisons will only heat up further. And how a dispute about time from exactly a century ago remains timely today.